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Sprit Boom reefing and lacing

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  • lancasterdennis
    Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit boom sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not seeing how I can reef if
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 28, 2006
      Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit boom
      sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not seeing
      how I can reef if the main is close up to the mast. the whole taper
      thing works against it. So, how is it done? I have read where the
      main is permenantly laced to the mast and furling is done from the
      clue, rollng forward. Where do I find information on how to sail the
      cat yawl rig and how to rig, snotter, etc.?

      Thank you and wishing all a happy new year. My Old Shoe project is
      still moving along, but very slowly due to the winter blues.

      Regards,

      Dennis
    • John and Kathy Trussell
      Dennis, Ain t nothin perfect. The problem is that the snotter has to be attached to the mast. This attachment works fine if your sail is on a track (as it is
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 28, 2006
        Dennis,

        Ain't nothin perfect. The problem is that the snotter has to be attached to the mast. This attachment works fine if your sail is on a track (as it is on a Dovekie and as drawn on Old Shoe). The snoter is attached to the front of the mast; the sailgoes up and down on the track, and everything works pretty well. Lacing , whether you lace to and fro (recommended) or round and round has part of the lacing in front of the mast. The snotter attachment point fouls the lacing if you lower the sail.

        One way around this is to incorporate vertical reefing. This usually involves a vertical batten and some sort of jiffy reefing system. If you can get your hands on Chappelle's books Boatbuilding or American Small Sailing Craft, there are illustrations showing this approach.

        JohnT
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: lancasterdennis
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 3:18 PM
        Subject: [bolger] Sprit Boom reefing and lacing


        Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit boom
        sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not seeing
        how I can reef if the main is close up to the mast. the whole taper
        thing works against it. So, how is it done? I have read where the
        main is permenantly laced to the mast and furling is done from the
        clue, rollng forward. Where do I find information on how to sail the
        cat yawl rig and how to rig, snotter, etc.?

        Thank you and wishing all a happy new year. My Old Shoe project is
        still moving along, but very slowly due to the winter blues.

        Regards,

        Dennis






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      • derbyrm
        As far as sailing a cat-yawl, you might want to check out on http://www.chebacco.com/ (tab on left of screen) Roger
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 28, 2006
          As far as sailing a cat-yawl, you might want to check out <Chebacco Sailing 101> on http://www.chebacco.com/ (tab on left of screen)

          Roger
          derbyrm@...
          http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: lancasterdennis
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 3:18 PM
          Subject: [bolger] Sprit Boom reefing and lacing


          Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit boom
          sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not seeing
          how I can reef if the main is close up to the mast. the whole taper
          thing works against it. So, how is it done? I have read where the
          main is permenantly laced to the mast and furling is done from the
          clue, rollng forward. Where do I find information on how to sail the
          cat yawl rig and how to rig, snotter, etc.?

          Thank you and wishing all a happy new year. My Old Shoe project is
          still moving along, but very slowly due to the winter blues.

          Regards,

          Dennis





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • craig o'donnell
          ... Jim Michalak has talked about this in his Essays -- the archives should be on Duckworks. (Google duckworks michalak). -- Craig O Donnell Sinepuxent
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 28, 2006
            >Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit boom
            >sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not seeing
            >how I can reef if the main is close up to the mast. the whole taper
            >thing works against it. So, how is it done? I have read where the
            >main is permenantly laced to the mast and furling is done from the
            >clue, rollng forward. Where do I find information on how to sail the
            >cat yawl rig and how to rig, snotter, etc.?
            >
            >Thank you and wishing all a happy new year. My Old Shoe project is
            >still moving along, but very slowly due to the winter blues.
            >
            >Regards,
            >
            >Dennis


            Jim Michalak has talked about this in his "Essays" -- the archives should
            be on Duckworks. (Google duckworks michalak).
            --
            Craig O'Donnell
            Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
            <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
            The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
            The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
            Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
            American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
            Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
            _________________________________

            -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
            -- Macintosh kinda guy
            Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
            _________________________________

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jamie Orr
            Hi Dennis, It s an awkward job however you do it. If your sail is laced semi-permanently to the mast i.e you furl it on the mast rather than lowering it, then
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 28, 2006
              Hi Dennis,

              It's an awkward job however you do it.

              If your sail is laced semi-permanently to the mast i.e you furl it
              on the mast rather than lowering it, then the reefing lines must
              move the sail forward, with the line of reef "points" being parallel
              to the luff and mast. This will bunch up the a portion of the sail
              immediately behind the mast which won't help your performance, but
              since you already have more wind than you can use, it may not be a
              big deal. Chappelle's "American Small Sailing Craft" has a drawing
              of a sharpie on page 106 that shows vertical reefing, although not
              in great detail.

              If your sail goes up and down then you can reef more or less
              normally, except that you will have to move the outboard end of the
              sprit boom to a cringle or grommet higher up the leech, in line with
              the reef points, which will become the new "foot" of the sail.

              I have created a folder called Elegant Punt in the *photos* section
              of this group with a picture of our elegant punt with its sprit-boom
              sail reefed. This sail does not go up and down with a halyard, so I
              did my reefing at the dock, by removing the mast, loosening the
              lacing, tying in the reef, (there is a line of grommets across the
              sail and I used short pieces of small line to tie the reef) moving
              the sprit-boom to a higher cringle, tightening the lacing with the
              sail lowered so the new foot is at the level of the old foot then
              putting the mast back in the boat. This was a viable solution for
              us as it let us go sailing in strong winds by reefing before we
              went. It would be extremely difficult to do on the water, to say
              the least.

              You referred to rolling up the sail from the clew -- you may be
              confusing reefing with brailing, which gathers up the sail from the
              leech forward. It tames the sail, but you can't sail properly while
              brailed.

              For Christmas I received a copy of David Nichols "The Working Guide
              to Small-Boat Sails" He doesn't go into reefing as much as he
              could, but it covers a number of traditional sail types and might be
              a good general guide. It's a good read in any case, and it's for
              sale through http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/

              Sorry for the long post, probably someone else has answered your
              question by now!

              Jamie

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "lancasterdennis" <dlancast@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Was wondering if anyone can give me advice on how to reef a sprit
              boom
              > sail. I want to lace my main and mizzen to the mast and am not
              seeing
              > how I can reef if the main is close up to the mast. the whole
              taper
              > thing works against it. So, how is it done? I have read where
              the
              > main is permenantly laced to the mast and furling is done from the
              > clue, rollng forward. Where do I find information on how to sail
              the
              > cat yawl rig and how to rig, snotter, etc.?
              >
              > Thank you and wishing all a happy new year. My Old Shoe project
              is
              > still moving along, but very slowly due to the winter blues.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Dennis
              >
            • craig o'donnell
              There are a couple variations. On the Oldshoe, you move the sprit boom up some and tie the foot of the sail in a bundle. On Chesapeake workboats, they would
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 29, 2006
                There are a couple variations. On the Oldshoe, you move the sprit boom up
                some and tie the foot of the sail in a bundle.

                On Chesapeake workboats, they would often just use a smaller sail and mast
                (ie, moving the "mizzen" into the "mainmast" step).

                Conor O'Brien uses a different approach by moving the sprit up the mast
                permanently -- scroll down:
                http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/boat/cob/COB_sea-boat.html

                Commodore Ralph Munroe use a sprit-boom system that it seems he and Cap Nat
                Herreshoff liked. There was a crotch bearing on the mast, and the snotter
                tackle was at the end of the boom pulling on the clew. I'm not sure I can
                reference a drawing and I've come across no description of the system in
                use, though I'm sure it must have been fairly simple to reef: the Commodore
                didn't mess around with extra lines and stuff that was hard to work.

                Finally, I "invented" a system based on a sprit-boom with club, that I've
                never tested. It results in a sail that is a little different shaped than a
                typical leg of mutton. Someday ... (I'll see if I can find a drawing to
                post).

                Vertical reefing is fine if you plan to run downwind or on a broad reach in
                bad weather. Workboats that used it would never try to beat to windward in
                bad weather anyway. If that's your plan, a motor makes more sense.
                --
                Craig O'Donnell
                Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                _________________________________

                -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                -- Macintosh kinda guy
                Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                _________________________________

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Phillip Lea
                I reef my Junebug exactly as Jamie does his Elegant Punt. It is as he states: impossible to perform underway. But in small boats such as these when you are
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 29, 2006
                  I reef my Junebug exactly as Jamie does his Elegant Punt. It is as
                  he states: impossible to perform underway. But in small boats such
                  as these when you are out for a couple of hours at most between
                  landfalls, you can step ashore, reef, or shake one out as needed.

                  Lacing the main was too time consuming to make adjustments, so by
                  the third season, I replaced the continuous lacing line with
                  individual ties at each luff grommet. Couldn't tell any difference
                  in performance (did not expect any) but adjustments and tying on
                  after long transport was very easy.

                  Also note that in seven seasons of sailing on inland lakes and a few
                  ocean bays, on more than a hundred different occassions, I have
                  sailed reefed only 4 times. In the Junebug when the wind is over 15
                  mph, too much water comes aboard to be safe. I figure Jamie has
                  found the same.

                  Phil Lea
                  Russellville, Arkansas

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Orr" <jas_orr@...> wrote:

                  > I have created a folder called Elegant Punt in the *photos*
                  section
                  > of this group with a picture of our elegant punt with its sprit-
                  boom
                  > sail reefed. This sail does not go up and down with a halyard, so
                  I
                  > did my reefing at the dock, by removing the mast, loosening the
                  > lacing, tying in the reef, (there is a line of grommets across the
                  > sail and I used short pieces of small line to tie the reef) moving
                  > the sprit-boom to a higher cringle, tightening the lacing with the
                  > sail lowered so the new foot is at the level of the old foot then
                  > putting the mast back in the boat. This was a viable solution for
                  > us as it let us go sailing in strong winds by reefing before we
                  > went. It would be extremely difficult to do on the water, to say
                  > the least.
                • bob@toadmail.com
                  One alternative to reefing the sprit boomed sail is to simply feather it, ie. flatten the sail by hardening up on the snotter and decrease the angle of the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 29, 2006
                    One alternative to reefing the sprit boomed sail is to simply feather
                    it, ie. flatten the sail by hardening up on the snotter and decrease
                    the angle of the sail to the wind (ie. luffing). This decreases the
                    sails power an may allow you to carry on. When this no longer serves,
                    it may be time to lower the rig and row. As Craig mentioned, here on
                    the Chesapeake where the rig was favored, boats had several rigs in
                    different sizes for the prevailing conditions at different times of the
                    year, along with multiple mast steps. The summer rig would generally
                    be a large main and smaller mizzen, in winter the mizzen alone might be
                    used in a center mast step. When overwhelmed the whole rig might have
                    been tossed overboard and used as a sea anchor.

                    Bob
                  • graeme19121984
                    ... Chappelle s American Small Sailing Craft has a drawing ... Hey, I was just reading that for the first time the other day, and experienced the pleasant
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 29, 2006
                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie Orr" <jas_orr@...> wrote:
                      Chappelle's "American Small Sailing Craft" has a drawing
                      > of a sharpie on page 106 that shows vertical reefing, although not
                      > in great detail.

                      Hey, I was just reading that for the first time the other day, and
                      experienced the pleasant realisation of how the much maligned
                      vertical reefing of the jib headed sprit boom sail may actually work
                      with ease. I recall a year or so ago that issues to do with the
                      reefing brail line binding and preventing the reef from shaking out
                      were raised here concerning the Birdwatcher 1A original sail plan.
                      Jim Michalak has also written of the problem concerning this rig on
                      boats he has later designed as well as his experience with the
                      original Birdwatcher.

                      The trouble is that the single reefing line as shown for Birdwatcher
                      1A (BWAOM p235) is necessarily quite lengthy and has many (8)
                      turning points where it may bind as it zigs and zags up the sail
                      between the luff and reefing band cringles. Suggestions have beeen
                      made including that the line be double ended, regularly waxed, and
                      thin to minimise binding and lengthy overhauling.

                      I'm not sure what PCB, or others following, who certainly have read
                      Chappelle were thinking.

                      On page 107 of "American Small Sailing Craft" at the bottom, facing
                      Figure 38 on page 106 (the redrawing of "B"'s 1879 "Forest and
                      Stream" One Man 1870's Tonging Sharpie) Chappelle explains how the
                      brail is rove: "The reef band was parallel to the hoist. In early
                      boats the reef was made by a SERIES OF BRAILS leading through
                      thimbles on the luff-rope and SPLICED INTO A SINGLE FALL, which
                      permitted reefing without lowering the sails." (My capitals. He goes
                      on to say that later boats had two reef bands that were tied in
                      manually as the sail was again raised after first being lowered. In
                      the sails drawn on page 106 having just one verticle reefing band
                      these later reefing points for manually tying in the reef are also
                      shown along with what he says is the earlier system of seried brails
                      spliced to a single fall. The one drawing is possibly used to
                      economically illustrate both reefing techniques from seperate
                      periods.) Using a magnifying glass (and hasn't every Bolgerado got
                      one?) there's a note on Chappelle's drawing that can also be made
                      out: "The number of brails used on a single sail varied from 2 to 5.
                      Brails were not commonly employed in the 1890's when two reef bands
                      in each sail became practice."

                      Now, Chappelle calls it a series of brails, but I think calling it a
                      number of parallel brails is a more apt description, also the
                      binding friction forces on the fall are individual and seperately
                      distributed in parallel. The problem with the Birdwatcher 1A sail
                      reefing is exactly that the brails are all in series, and the
                      binding forces are cumulative. Handily, the overhauling of the
                      reefing brail line fall would reduce in the Birdwatcher 1A sail from
                      around 20ft to only 2ft if the 1870's technique were used. Wonderful
                      stuff!

                      Was PCB just doodling? Thinking it looked easier to rove (love that
                      word) without the splices. Siezing would do anyway. The difference
                      is akin to that between shoe laces and velcro!

                      Graeme
                      PS. For Birdwatcher 1A, PCB shows single luff ties, but his system
                      of seperately paired figure 8 luff ties will let the sail slide down
                      the mast easier, and is better than the spiral lacing shown by
                      Chappelle in Fig 38.
                    • craig o'donnell
                      ... Hey. Good catch. I ve seen some full-size Chappelle originals. What wonderful drawing. ASSC doesn t do them justice. See
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 30, 2006
                        >--- In <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie
                        >Orr" <jas_orr@...> wrote:
                        >Chappelle's "American Small Sailing Craft" has a drawing
                        >> of a sharpie on page 106 that shows vertical reefing, although not
                        >> in great detail.
                        >
                        >Hey, I was just reading that for the first time the other day, and
                        >experienced the pleasant realisation of how the much maligned
                        >vertical reefing of the jib headed sprit boom sail may actually work
                        >with ease. I recall a year or so ago that issues to do with the
                        >
                        >
                        >I'm not sure what PCB, or others following, who certainly have read
                        >Chappelle were thinking.
                        >
                        >On page 107 of "American Small Sailing Craft" at the bottom, facing
                        >Figure 38 on page 106 (the redrawing of "B"'s 1879 "Forest and
                        >Stream" One Man 1870's Tonging Sharpie) Chappelle explains how the
                        >brail is rove: "The reef band was parallel to the hoist. In early
                        >boats the reef was made by a SERIES OF BRAILS leading through
                        >thimbles on the luff-rope and SPLICED INTO A SINGLE FALL, which
                        >permitted reefing without lowering the sails." (My capitals. He goes
                        >on to say that later boats had two reef bands that were tied in
                        >manually as the sail was again raised after first being lowered. In
                        >the sails drawn on page 106 having just one verticle reefing band
                        >these later reefing points for manually tying in the reef are also
                        >shown along with what he says is the earlier system of seried brails
                        >spliced to a single fall. The one drawing is possibly used to
                        >economically illustrate both reefing techniques from seperate
                        >periods.) Using a magnifying glass (and hasn't every Bolgerado got
                        >one?) there's a note on Chappelle's drawing that can also be made
                        >out: "The number of brails used on a single sail varied from 2 to 5.
                        >Brails were not commonly employed in the 1890's when two reef bands
                        >in each sail became practice."
                        >
                        >Now, Chappelle calls it a series of brails, but I think calling it a
                        >number of parallel brails is a more apt description, also the
                        >binding friction forces on the fall are individual and seperately
                        >distributed in parallel. The problem with the Birdwatcher 1A sail
                        >reefing is exactly that the brails are all in series, and the
                        >binding forces are cumulative. Handily, the overhauling of the
                        >reefing brail line fall would reduce in the Birdwatcher 1A sail from
                        >around 20ft to only 2ft if the 1870's technique were used. Wonderful
                        >stuff!
                        >
                        >Was PCB just doodling? Thinking it looked easier to rove (love that
                        >word) without the splices. Siezing would do anyway. The difference
                        >is akin to that between shoe laces and velcro!
                        >
                        >Graeme
                        >PS. For Birdwatcher 1A, PCB shows single luff ties, but his system
                        >of seperately paired figure 8 luff ties will let the sail slide down
                        >the mast easier, and is better than the spiral lacing shown by
                        >Chappelle in Fig 38.

                        Hey. Good catch. I've seen some full-size Chappelle originals. What
                        wonderful drawing. ASSC doesn't do them justice.

                        See http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/articles/chapelle/index.cfm for a
                        vertical batten brail.
                        --
                        Craig O'Donnell
                        Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                        <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                        The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                        The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                        Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                        American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                        Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                        _________________________________

                        -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                        -- Macintosh kinda guy
                        Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                        _________________________________

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Lewis E. Gordon
                        Remember that most of these drawings are available from the Smithsonian. Order the catalog of plans (ad is usually in the classifieds of WB) and then order the
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 30, 2006
                          Remember that most of these drawings are available from the
                          Smithsonian. Order the catalog of plans (ad is usually in the
                          classifieds of WB) and then order the chosen plans. I found that it is
                          best to not order too many at once as the clerk apparently gets
                          hurried and moves the original before the copy is completed. The
                          catalog is basicly indexed by publication name and plate number.

                          Lewis

                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, craig o'donnell <dadadata@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > >--- In <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie
                          > >Orr" <jas_orr@> wrote:
                          > >Chappelle's "American Small Sailing Craft" has a drawing
                          > >> of a sharpie on page 106 that shows vertical reefing, although not
                          > >> in great detail.
                          > >
                          > >Hey, I was just reading that for the first time the other day, and
                          > >experienced the pleasant realisation of how the much maligned
                          > >vertical reefing of the jib headed sprit boom sail may actually work
                          > >with ease. I recall a year or so ago that issues to do with the
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >I'm not sure what PCB, or others following, who certainly have read
                          > >Chappelle were thinking.
                          > >
                          > >On page 107 of "American Small Sailing Craft" at the bottom, facing
                          > >Figure 38 on page 106 (the redrawing of "B"'s 1879 "Forest and
                          > >Stream" One Man 1870's Tonging Sharpie) Chappelle explains how the
                          > >brail is rove: "The reef band was parallel to the hoist. In early
                          > >boats the reef was made by a SERIES OF BRAILS leading through
                          > >thimbles on the luff-rope and SPLICED INTO A SINGLE FALL, which
                          > >permitted reefing without lowering the sails." (My capitals. He goes
                          > >on to say that later boats had two reef bands that were tied in
                          > >manually as the sail was again raised after first being lowered. In
                          > >the sails drawn on page 106 having just one verticle reefing band
                          > >these later reefing points for manually tying in the reef are also
                          > >shown along with what he says is the earlier system of seried brails
                          > >spliced to a single fall. The one drawing is possibly used to
                          > >economically illustrate both reefing techniques from seperate
                          > >periods.) Using a magnifying glass (and hasn't every Bolgerado got
                          > >one?) there's a note on Chappelle's drawing that can also be made
                          > >out: "The number of brails used on a single sail varied from 2 to 5.
                          > >Brails were not commonly employed in the 1890's when two reef bands
                          > >in each sail became practice."
                          > >
                          > >Now, Chappelle calls it a series of brails, but I think calling it a
                          > >number of parallel brails is a more apt description, also the
                          > >binding friction forces on the fall are individual and seperately
                          > >distributed in parallel. The problem with the Birdwatcher 1A sail
                          > >reefing is exactly that the brails are all in series, and the
                          > >binding forces are cumulative. Handily, the overhauling of the
                          > >reefing brail line fall would reduce in the Birdwatcher 1A sail from
                          > >around 20ft to only 2ft if the 1870's technique were used. Wonderful
                          > >stuff!
                          > >
                          > >Was PCB just doodling? Thinking it looked easier to rove (love that
                          > >word) without the splices. Siezing would do anyway. The difference
                          > >is akin to that between shoe laces and velcro!
                          > >
                          > >Graeme
                          > >PS. For Birdwatcher 1A, PCB shows single luff ties, but his system
                          > >of seperately paired figure 8 luff ties will let the sail slide down
                          > >the mast easier, and is better than the spiral lacing shown by
                          > >Chappelle in Fig 38.
                          >
                          > Hey. Good catch. I've seen some full-size Chappelle originals. What
                          > wonderful drawing. ASSC doesn't do them justice.
                          >
                          > See
                          http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/articles/chapelle/index.cfm for a
                          > vertical batten brail.
                          > --
                          > Craig O'Donnell
                          > Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                          > <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                          > The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                          > The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                          > Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                          > American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                          > Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                          > _________________________________
                          >
                          > -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                          > -- Macintosh kinda guy
                          > Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                          > _________________________________
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                        • captreed48
                          Another alternative is to have the snotter be a line from the mast step to the head of the mast with a small loop in it to catch the forward end of the boom.
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 31, 2006
                            Another alternative is to have the snotter be a line from the mast step
                            to the head of the mast with a small loop in it to catch the forward
                            end of the boom. This allows the laced sail to be lowered without the
                            lacing fouling the snotter attachment. With a block and a cam cleat at
                            the lower end the tension on the snotter can be adjusted easily.

                            Reed
                          • graeme19121984
                            Noted. Thanks Lewis. Graeme ... and then order the chosen plans.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jan 1, 2007
                              Noted. Thanks Lewis.

                              Graeme


                              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon" <l_gordon_nica@...>
                              wrote:
                              >Order the catalog of plans (ad is usually in the classifieds of WB)
                              and then order the chosen plans.
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