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Re: [bolger] Re: Cruising Canoe

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  • Kristine Bennett
    I think it would look better keeping her stern shape and put in an outboard well and cover the OB to keep the sound of the motor to a min. Krissie ...
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 8, 2006
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      I think it would look better keeping her stern shape
      and put in an outboard well and cover the OB to keep
      the sound of the motor to a min.

      Krissie
      --- Howard Stephenson <stephensonhw@...> wrote:

      > Yes. I've often thought it would make a nice little
      > power cruiser,
      > with a small outboard hung on a transom formed by
      > cutting the hull off
      > at the aft bulkhead shown in Bruce's rendition.
      >
      > Or, maybe more interesting, it would be about right
      > for electric
      > power. There should be enough displacement to take a
      > fair weight in
      > batteries.
      >
      >
      > Howard
      >




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    • Bob Slimak
      You might also check your library magazine/periodical computer for articles by Ida little. I have read several articles by her over the years on her cruising
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 8, 2006
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        You might also check your library magazine/periodical computer for articles by Ida little. I have read several articles by her over the years on her cruising adventures with the canoe cruiser. I believe they sold it a couple of years ago. Nice cruising articles for messers as they are definitely not yachties. I think they may have been in Cruising World, but not sure as I can tell you it's NOT the KNEES that go first!
        Bob Slimak
        PS Thinking about Yachties reminded me of time in the Bahamas before cell and sat. phones. You went to the phone station, gave the person the number you wished to call, then went and sat down to wait for your name and which station to go to. While waiting I overhead two guys talking (maybe bragging and trying to outdo each other). " I like to put my towel in the dryer while I am showing so I will have a hot towel when I get out." "Well, I have a Sauna on board and like to sweat it out." Hmmm- my solar shower in the cockpit just won't do, I guess. Lucky for them sat phones and TV and all the rest are now available on board for the rich.


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      • Peter Lenihan
        ... rendering of Resolution. Hi Bruce, Love the renderings,as usual, since they really make the drawings leap right off the page.Neat stuff! It would never
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 8, 2006
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
          >
          > And to say the obvious, Dugong is very close to a half scale
          rendering
          of Resolution.


          Hi Bruce,

          Love the renderings,as usual, since they really make the drawings
          leap right off the page.Neat stuff!
          It would never have occured to me that such a fine ended
          shape,with such narrow waterlines up forward,approached the much
          fuller sections of Resolution.
          Guess I have to go and dig out the Folding Schooner......and take
          a better look at Resolution,with a magnifying glass :-D

          Thanks for all the time you take away from your Spyder to offer
          us these renderings!


          Sincerely,

          Peter Lenihan
        • c.ruzer
          http://www.amazon.com/Beach-Cruising-Coastal-Camping-Little/dp/0918752159 We could not find the boat we wanted in 1979. So we built our own canoe cruiser,
          Message 4 of 14 , May 16, 2011
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            http://www.amazon.com/Beach-Cruising-Coastal-Camping-Little/dp/0918752159

            "We could not find the boat we wanted in 1979. So we built our own "canoe cruiser," Dugong, from plans that Phil Bolger drew up for us." http://www.cruisingworld.com/how-to/living-aboard/we-just-kept-going-an-oral-history-of-the-cruising-life



            Genesis

            Ida Little and Michael Walsh: We began cruising in June 1972 and continued to cruise for at least half of every year, in various boats, until 1997. Having no idea what cruising was all about when we started cruising, we headed for England because a sail had been made there for the boat. We ran into the aftermath of Hurricane Agnes en route to Bermuda. This made our crew so reluctant to continue that we diverted to Puerto Rico on his request. On arrival in San Juan, he promptly flew back to Minnesota, leaving us to manage the old, leaky, 40-foot ketch by ourselves. After cruising the West Indies to South America we sailed north to the Bahamas where we shipwrecked (see "Castling the King," June 2004). A year later we returned to the Bahamas to cruise for the next 25 years. With all that clear shallow water, protected seas, miles and miles of uninhabited shoreline, balmy climate, fish and lobster infested reefs, and some of the kindest people on earth, these islands are ideal cruising grounds for us.


            Exodus

            Ida Little and Michael Walsh: We chose our first boat, a wooden 40-foot English Channel racer converted to cruiser, because it was affordable (cheap) and big enough to take us comfortably to sea for an indefinite length of time. We soon learned that a 12-ton boat with a 6-foot draft didn't let us safely get close enough to most shorelines.

            Because we had learned from Sheldrake that deep draft cruising didn't suit us and that we really didn't like anchoring out, our next boats were a Hobie Cat and sailing canoe. With these small boats we cruised through the Bahamas, camping ashore each night. This worked so beautifully that we continued for years.

            After years of shore camps, we thought about getting a shoal draft boat that would be more comfortable and more seaworthy for the crossings between the island groups. We could not find the boat we wanted in 1979. So we built our own "canoe cruiser," Dugong, from plans that Phil Bolger drew up for us.

            On our shakedown cruise with Dugong we happened to meet up with Julius Wilensky who was working on a cruising guide to the Keys. He convinced us to try the Keys instead of the Bahamas. We not only tried it but continued cruising the Keys and the islets west off Key West for four years.

            While cruising in the Keys we began to think about a boat capable of crossing to the Bahamas. We met Beachcomber and her builder, Warren Bailey, in the Key West Yacht Club. He was having a hard time finding someone as eccentric as himself who would want such an unconventional boat. She was perfect for us. At 36 feet with 18 inches of draft, we considered her a bigger version of our Dugong.

            Her flat bottom and retractable prop shaft, centerboard, and rudder and made her ideal for the thin water cruising we loved. Though she could move along fine, she couldn't sail to weather nor push into steep seas as well as a heavy, deep keeled boat. We took this as a sign that whenever possible, we should do our best to broad reach, on gentle seas. This suited us pretty well.

            Revelation

            ...Worst moments definitely capture the drama.

            Shipwrecking on Great Inagua is another worst moment. We'd been struggling with a cold front for days, nearly shipwrecked on uninhabited Little Inagua, and finally drifted onto a reef during the night and couldn't get off. The whole night of pounding up and down, watching the boat break up and all our worldly possessions slosh around in sea water, not knowing if we'd be able to get ourselves safely to shore or to anywhere for help, made for another long, worst moment.

            Wisdom

            Lin and Larry Pardey: Go small, go simple, but go now...

            Ida Little and Michael Walsh: We want to get on a boat, sail away to remote shores and stay there to play and to live. The seas and shores we most appreciate are the rare unregulated and unpopulated frontiers left on earth. We love life in the open air, focused on land and sea and life under the sea. We seek associations with people who live simply (as most Bahamians do) and with the free spirited community of cruisers.

            Whether we're cruising full time, part time or day sailing, it's all the same. http://dennisonberwick.info/?p=1194 http://dennisonberwick.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/the-200-millionaire.pdf



            The only folks I can compare you to is a couple of dedicated beach bums by the name of Ida Little and Michael Walsh. I remember whipping off a letter to them after reading their fine article "In Search of Anse Dufour: Canoe Cruising in the Caribbean" which appeared in Small Boat Journal in 1987. Their boating motto? Keep it simple, as in a canoe if possible. Ida graciously wrote me back a quick note about their new trailerable 36-foot liveaboard, built with an 18" draft so they could still ground out on sandy beaches in the Bahamas where they had decided to spend winters. (It was felt that a canoe was probably not the best craft for the trip over the Gulf Stream or as a long-term liveaboard.) The new boat's name? Beachcomber! At the time they were polishing off a manuscript that eventually came out as the 352 page "Beachcruising and Coastal Camping" (1992).

            Beachcomber led them to more adventures which were published as "The Thin-Water Alternative" (Cruising World Oct 1998) and "License to Play" (Cruising World Sept 2001). The latter article summed up their philosophy best: "We chose cruising as a lifestyle many years ago, intentionally selecting a life in the wild with enough leisure time to appreciate it...For me, a day of bird-watching is a day well spent." Sound familiar?
            http://www.c-brats.com/viewtopic.php?t=11520


            Beachcomber

            Designer/Builder: Warren Bailey LOA: 36[feet] LOD: 35[feet]5[inches] LWL: 32[feet] Beam: 8[feet] Draft: 1[foot]5[inches] (board up) 7[feet]5[inches] (board down) Displacement: 9,000 lbs. Sail Area: 425 sq. ft. Mast Height: 39[feet]

            Warren Bailey designed and built Beachcomber in 1972. He was 50 then. A child prodigy of sorts, Warren had designed and built his first boat at age 10 and in subsequent years developed and built not only his well-known Moth designs, but several others as well. Over the course of a career that included stints as lead man building and converting military patrol and rescue boats at Miami Shipbuilding during World War II, as production foreman at Bertram during the '60s, and as an independent designer and builder during the '50s, Warren developed a special affinity for "ultra" shoal-draft vessels. Though retired as a builder, Warren is still designing boats and still prefers to work the old-fashioned way, carving half-hull models from which he draws his plans.

            Beachcomber was the last boat Warren built - hull number 795 - and he and his wife, Hertha, cruised her across the shoals of the Florida Keys and the Bahamas for more than 10 years. Ida and I had likewise been sailing our shoal-draft, Bolger-designed, 26-foot canoe cruiser, Dugong, ("In Praise Of The Beachable Boat," August 1984) for 10 years … http://business.highbeam.com/137472/article-1G1-21164604/beachcomber-thinwater-thoroughbred

            THE KEY TO OUR SUCCESS
            We made the major breakthrough into our new life of low-cost and far-ranging abundance when we sold our 40-foot ketch (which was a constant financial drain and which would never slip into the really isolated bays, inlets, and shoals we like to explore anyway), and bought a 17-foot canoe instead. http://www.motherearthnews.com/Nature-Community/1977-01-01/Live-On-Less.aspx


            http://mdi.villagesoup.com/blog/blog/guest-blog-sailing-the-florida-wilderness/388686

            http://www.thorfinnexpeditions.com/blog/2011/02/thorfinn-sails-the-wilds-of-florida/

            http://councill.home.mindspring.com/sbjournal/sbjournal.html
            http://idalittle.com/#_

            An AS19 might go back on the list for: "To begin with, I believe that in most, but certainly not every small boat, the potential for a shoal water cruiser exists. Beyond the necessity for seaworthiness and shallow draft, the essentials are:
            -A dry place to lie down full length and turn over during the night.
            -A portable head or port-a-potty, as it has come to be called.
            -Enough storage room for food, water and clothing for the duration of the intended voyage.
            -A place to cook food and clean up after a meal.
            -A place to relax and read or listen to music or the sounds of nature in both the sitting and reclining posture.
            -Shelter"
            http://www.seapearlboats.org/html/ron_s_article.html

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/66250

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bob Slimak <otter55806@...> wrote:
            >
            > You might also check your library magazine/periodical computer for articles by Ida little. I have read several articles by her over the years on her cruising adventures with the canoe cruiser. I believe they sold it a couple of years ago. Nice cruising articles for messers as they are definitely not yachties. I think they may have been in Cruising World, but not sure as I can tell you it's NOT the KNEES that go first!
            > Bob Slimak
            > PS Thinking about Yachties reminded me of time in the Bahamas before cell and sat. phones. You went to the phone station, gave the person the number you wished to call, then went and sat down to wait for your name and which station to go to. While waiting I overhead two guys talking (maybe bragging and trying to outdo each other). " I like to put my towel in the dryer while I am showing so I will have a hot towel when I get out." "Well, I have a Sauna on board and like to sweat it out." Hmmm- my solar shower in the cockpit just won't do, I guess. Lucky for them sat phones and TV and all the rest are now available on board for the rich.
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