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Design 572, Viking Longship

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  • Bruce Hallman
    Is this website about Bolger s Viking Longship design #572? http://rholtz.home.texas.net/Progress/Progress.htm Here is the MAIB article, lines and my Freeship
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
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    • Bruce Hallman
      http://hallman.org/bolger/572/Strakes.png In case anybody is curious, here are what the strakes to Bolger #572, Viking Longship look like. A 38 ft boat is a
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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        http://hallman.org/bolger/572/Strakes.png

        In case anybody is curious, here are what the strakes to Bolger #572,
        Viking Longship look like.

        A 38 ft boat is a bit much to whip out in a weekend, but I bet that a
        20 foot plystrake version would build quick, row and sail superbly and
        make a heck of a fun day boat!
      • Mark Albanese
        There s no credit to Phil Bolger on the site. Did they rejuvenate one they had? #572 does look wonderful. Here s JK s link to Atkin s Valgerda, a similar
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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          There's no credit to Phil Bolger on the site. Did they rejuvenate one
          they had?

          #572 does look wonderful. Here's JK's link to Atkin's Valgerda, a
          similar concept in about the size you mention. Not as lovely as the
          Bolger but maybe there are some clues here as to proportion and to
          fitting out.
          http://www.boat-links.com/Atkinco/Sail/Valgerda.html


          On Nov 2, 2006, at 12:56 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

          > Is this website about Bolger's Viking Longship design #572?
          >
          > http://rholtz.home.texas.net/Progress/Progress.htm
          >
          > Here is the MAIB article, lines and my Freeship model
          >
          > http://hallman.org/bolger/572/572Longship.png
          > http://hallman.org/bolger/572/572VikingLongshipArticle.png
          > http://hallman.org/bolger/572/572Longship.fbm
          >
          >
          > Bolger rules!!!
          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging
          > dead horses
          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred'
          > posts
          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
          > 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
          > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Bruce Hallman
          ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/sets/72157594359365073/ For images of a paper model.
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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            > #572 does look wonderful.

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/sets/72157594359365073/

            For images of a paper model.
          • Mark Albanese
            ... These show very clearly how fine the ends are. Freeship says the prismatic coefficient is just .3209. Guess you ll have to call yours Slipper. I hoped to
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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              On Nov 3, 2006, at 3:08 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:
              >
              > http://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/sets/72157594359365073/
              > For images of a paper model.

              These show very clearly how fine the ends are. Freeship says the
              prismatic coefficient is just .3209. Guess you'll have to call yours
              'Slipper.'
              I hoped to see what the righting moments are on various proportions
              but haven't found that in the program yet.

              At 20 feet, this'd be a big, big canoe.
              >

              > Bolger rules!!!
              > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
              > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging
              > dead horses
              > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred'
              > posts
              > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
              > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
              > 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Kristine Bennett
              ... Yah sure you da betch Yah! Oly, Sweven, Goutson, and I can kick it out is a few weekends ..... I use to work with some old square heads, they all were a
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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                > In case anybody is curious, here are what the
                > strakes to Bolger #572,
                > Viking Longship look like.
                >
                > A 38 ft boat is a bit much to whip out in a weekend,
                > but I bet that a
                > 20 foot plystrake version would build quick, row and
                > sail superbly and
                > make a heck of a fun day boat!

                "Yah sure you da betch Yah! Oly, Sweven, Goutson, and
                I can kick it out is a few weekends"..... I use to
                work with some old square heads, they all were a hoot
                to work with! They could make make some of the most
                nasty jobs become almost enjoyable! There is also a
                fair amount of Viking blood in my family as well.

                I watched Oly and Goutsom fit and install a boat plank
                faster with hand tools then you could with power
                tools. Those two old farts use to race the young guys
                to see who was buying the beer Friday after work. The
                rules were easy the one with the least number of feet
                installed had to buy the first round of beer.

                But mind you the boats these guys were working on were
                36 feet and up work boats. Some of the planks were
                4x10 or 12, by 20 to 40 feet long at times. Yes big
                stuff.

                The sad part is the old guys I use to talk with as a
                kid and watch them work the wood are all gone. To them
                working wood was an art form.

                Blessings all! Kristine



                ____________________________________________________________________________________
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              • Bruce Hallman
                ... I am imagining plywood lapstrake construction similar to I used on Cartoon 5. With, rib/molds, like Bolger designed with Spur II It really is (can be) a
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
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                  > "Yah sure you da betch Yah! Oly, Sweven, Goutson, and
                  > I can kick it out is a few weekends".....

                  I am imagining plywood lapstrake construction similar to I used on Cartoon 5.

                  With, rib/molds, like Bolger designed with Spur II

                  It really is (can be) a fast way to build a boat.

                  Ply/lapstrake certainly is a forgiving way to build a boat, with a
                  very high tolerance for sloppy work! (good for me)

                  http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE

                  I can't recall exactly, but that 16 foot boat took roughly 60 hours
                  'spare time' and was finished in less than one month.

                  A 20 foot boat, similarly built, shouldn't take more than twice that
                  effort, I figure.

                  Heck, a 16 foot viking longship would be fun too.
                • Nels
                  ... Cartoon 5. ... Whatever you do - don t put a rudder on it! Storboard only - otherwise it is a cheap celtic rip off;-) I am sure that is the group that
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
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                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > "Yah sure you da betch Yah! Oly, Sweven, Goutson, and
                    > > I can kick it out is a few weekends".....
                    >
                    > I am imagining plywood lapstrake construction similar to I used on
                    Cartoon 5.
                    >
                    > With, rib/molds, like Bolger designed with Spur II
                    >
                    > It really is (can be) a fast way to build a boat.
                    >
                    > Ply/lapstrake certainly is a forgiving way to build a boat, with a
                    > very high tolerance for sloppy work! (good for me)
                    >
                    > http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE
                    >
                    > I can't recall exactly, but that 16 foot boat took roughly 60 hours
                    > 'spare time' and was finished in less than one month.
                    >
                    > A 20 foot boat, similarly built, shouldn't take more than twice that
                    > effort, I figure.
                    >
                    > Heck, a 16 foot viking longship would be fun too.
                    >

                    Whatever you do - don't put a rudder on it! Storboard only - otherwise
                    it is a cheap celtic rip off;-)

                    I am sure that is the group that commissioned the plans and Bruce
                    Hector stopped in to visit them once when he was pillaging in the
                    lower 48.

                    Nels
                  • Nels
                    Here is a link to some others http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/index.htm You see lots of the faerings in Scandenavia. One place I visited had them
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
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                      Here is a link to some others

                      http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/index.htm

                      You see lots of the faerings in Scandenavia. One place I visited had
                      them available free to try out by visiters but it was really pouring
                      when we were there.

                      http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/index.htm

                      Nels
                    • graeme19121984
                      ... Bruce went with a faering I think, but not before considering the fun of the only built #572 he found. MuWie is still in use as a tourist passenger vessel.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
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                        >Bruce Hector

                        Bruce went with a faering I think, but not before considering the
                        fun of the only built #572 he found. MuWie is still in use as a
                        tourist passenger vessel. Do rowers pay more for a ticket than non-
                        rowers?

                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/43246 see the links
                        at message bottom.

                        At the "Grune Flotte" button or URL click on MuWie or in
                        English, "Muwi". The photos showing Muwi aren't as many or as large
                        as the site used to have. I seem to recall there used to be a good
                        one of Viking waterfighters raiding.

                        Graeme


                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@> wrote:

                        > > Heck, a 16 foot viking longship would be fun too.
                        > >
                        > I am sure that is the group that commissioned the plans and Bruce
                        > Hector stopped in to visit them once when he was pillaging in the
                        > lower 48.
                      • John Kohnen
                        Valgerda is a Hardanger faering, with some little changes (plywood planking, ballast keel) from the Atkins. Faering means four-oared boat, so there s
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 4, 2006
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                          Valgerda is a Hardanger faering, with some little changes (plywood
                          planking, ballast keel) from the Atkins. "Faering" means four-oared boat,
                          so there's probably a lot of variation in the designs of boats so named,
                          but the Hardanger faering is traditionally planked with a few very wide
                          planks, longships were built with many narrow planks. It makes a
                          difference in the sections and the ends. A wide-plank faering was found
                          inside one of the Viking burial ships, so they were building boats with
                          wide and narrow planks in the Viking age. That old faering doesn't look
                          much different in hull shape from the Valgerda sitting in my shop! Of
                          course it'd be impossible to build a longship with just a few planks per
                          side, since the planks would have to be really, really wide! <g> But the
                          necessity of using many relatively narrow strakes also allowed the Viking
                          shipbuilders to put more shape into their longships.

                          On Fri, 03 Nov 2006 14:28:26 -0800, Mark A wrote:

                          > ...
                          > #572 does look wonderful. Here's JK's link to Atkin's Valgerda, a
                          > similar concept in about the size you mention. Not as lovely as the
                          > Bolger but maybe there are some clues here as to proportion and to
                          > fitting out.
                          > http://www.boat-links.com/Atkinco/Sail/Valgerda.html

                          --
                          John <jkohnen@...>
                          One boat just leads to another. <John Kohnen>
                        • Allan Pickman
                          Flashback time. Reminds me of the quick and dirty boatbuilding contests at the woodenboat shows of the early to mid eighties. six 2x4 s, two and a half
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 5, 2006
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                            Flashback time.

                            Reminds me of the quick and dirty boatbuilding contests at the woodenboat shows of the early to mid eighties. "six 2x4's, two and a half sheets of 1/4" lauan, and all the Sikaflex 241 you can use." Some boats were built in about an hour, others took close to four. The last day of the show there was a race, in which a lot of people got wet.

                            A good time was had by all

                            Allan,
                            in the hills



                            > I am imagining plywood lapstrake construction similar to I used on Cartoon 5.
                            >
                            > With, rib/molds, like Bolger designed with Spur II
                            >
                            > It really is (can be) a fast way to build a boat.
                            >
                            > Ply/lapstrake certainly is a forgiving way to build a boat, with a
                            > very high tolerance for sloppy work! (good for me)
                            >
                            > http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE
                            >
                            > I can't recall exactly, but that 16 foot boat took roughly 60 hours
                            > 'spare time' and was finished in less than one month.
                            >
                            > A 20 foot boat, similarly built, shouldn't take more than twice that
                            > effort, I figure.
                          • Mark Albanese
                            An article in the Sunday magazine comments on both the green and chic aspects with a little on the material properties of bamboo.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Nov 6, 2006
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                              An article in the Sunday magazine comments on both the green and chic
                              aspects with a little on the material properties of bamboo.
                              http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/05/magazine/05wwln_consumed.html


                              Not much supply known in my neighborhood, so these vendors caught my
                              interest.

                              1 x 4 flooring and mats
                              http://www.bamboosupply.net/default.htm


                              Poles and sheets + Barry digs Burning Man
                              http://bamboobarry.com/us/index.htm#

                              6 more for poles and lumber
                              http://www.ez4search.com/search.php?searchname=bamboo



                              Important notes on species
                              http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/n_the_other.html

                              The caption here is, "10 meter woven bamboo boat. With retractable
                              rudder. '60's"
                              http://www.vietnamboats.org/Photos2/wovento10m.jpg









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