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Tennessee diesel powered

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  • Kristine Bennett
    Some one said they were thinking about installing a diesel in a Tennessee. I ll try and find your Tennie photos, a diesel on a ... I m not sure what kind of HP
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Some one said they were thinking about installing a
      diesel in a Tennessee.

      I'll try and find your Tennie photos, a diesel on a
      > Tennie sounds
      > interesting, inboard I presume?

      I'm not sure what kind of HP you are looking for. I
      have worked around a lot of marine diesels over the
      years and some are smoother then others. The
      smoothness of the engine has more to do with the
      number of cylinders more then anything. A single
      cylinder. will shake real bad at most RPM but they do
      have a few smooth spots the same is true of the four
      cylinders as well. Yet the 2 cylinders is smoother
      over a wide range and with most 3 and 6 cylinders they
      are smooth all over the RPM range.

      There is or was a 33 HP 3 cylinder Westerbek for sale
      up here for under 400 dollars it ran when they took it
      out of the boat and is less the marine trans. It needs
      new glow plugs and it has about 2000 hours on it. I
      can find out more info if you want or get you the
      contact info.

      The engine is about 70 miles north of Seattle
      Washington if it's still there.

      Blessings Kristine

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    • Chester Young
      Dave: I avoid going forward to the point of spending time drifting when anchor might be a better option, if it is lunch or something I will set an anchor from
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 9, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Dave:



        I avoid going forward to the point of spending time drifting when anchor
        might be a better option, if it is lunch or something I will set an anchor
        from the stern. Stern anchoring also keeps the noise down and if it too
        rough for that then you are in the wrong spot. Getting to the bow is a BIG
        pain. My 40 something knees are not as young as they used to be and it is a
        crawl to get there. I now have my hands on a hatch to be rebuilt and
        installed up front. I like the idea of the open bow for ease of access and
        there is no good use for the space under cover, it is too far forward to
        place much weight and I suspect the original concept was to prevent people
        from standing there and overloading the bow. Docking would benefit from
        forward access, instead of just all gathering in the cockpit while I
        practice crashing into stationary objects. To be fair, I am starting to get
        good at making suggestions to Esther Mae on how to behave when approaching
        the dock. So far I have not crashed in such fashion as leave a mark.

        The bottom of Esther Mae is two sheets of 3/8”. I will have look at her
        frames, I think they are ¾”. One keel.



        Caloosarat

        If I would quit driving her around on the weekends then I could get some
        work done, but then I would not be driving her would I?

        _____

        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        musseler
        Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 8:17 PM
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?



        Chester,

        Thanks again for the pics, if I ever get her built I will experiment
        with different squat board angles, they make a lot of sense to me.
        Do you have much occasion to go forward to the bow to set the
        anchor? Do you climb over the cabin, go around it, or go to the
        forward hatch from within to get there? Also, did he use 1/2" ply or
        3/8" ply on the bottom? Are his frames 3/4" or did he opt for 1.5"
        frames? Did he add extra bottom strakes or stick with the one keel
        as Bolgers plan shows? Hope you don't mind a few questions,
        Chester, but I want to get her built right the first time!
        -- Dave

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Chester
        Young" <chester@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dave:
        >
        >
        >
        > I have posted a couple of photos in the Esther Mae album. One
        gives a good
        > view of the boards with the boat at rest. Note the wire on the
        port side;
        > it leads to the transducer for the depth sounder. The black crud
        is just
        > that, crud from having the good fortune to put Esther Mae in the
        water
        > frequently enough that it grows. The rest of the boat has bottom
        paint and
        > does not exhibit near the growth that the squat boards do. I have
        scrubbed
        > the boards on a regular occasion.
        >
        >
        >
        > The other photo was standing on the stern looking down while
        underway. Note
        > the location of the transducer, the force of the water as it flows
        under the
        > squat boards is enough that the water bubbles up about 6" when
        traveling at
        > 5mph. I assume that it is even more at higher speed. This
        indicates the
        > amount of pressure that the squat boards experience, which says
        that they
        > are functioning as additional hull length. The boards extend
        back form the
        > stern at an angle slightly downward from the bottom of the boat
        itself,
        > adding potential lift when at speed.
        >
        >
        >
        > I do not know if the boards made a difference once added. The
        prior owner,
        > died within a week of selling me the boat so I did not have the
        chance to
        > question him on this. I watched and waited for three years
        before he
        > would sell. His being sick was the only reason he entertained
        selling. He
        > called me because I am acquainted with his son and told to let me
        know if
        > his dad ever wanted to sell. I cannot blame him for holding on to
        her for
        > so long, who wouldn't?
        >
        >
        >
        > Caloosarat
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
        [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
        Behalf Of
        > musseler
        > Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:18 AM
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
        >
        >
        >
        > Thanks Caloosarat,
        > The "sqat boards" look to be set at an angle with the hull bottom,
        > instead of following the hull bottom line, maybe the close-up
        > pictures will show more about this. My build of the Tennessee will
        > be called "June Marie" after my better half, of course, and I have
        > some pictures of the shop & cutout frames posted at
        > www.thestorydoctor.com/tpics/JuneMarie.htm If you go to
        > www.thestorydoctor.com, be sure to look at the "Virtual Voyager"
        > link, most people find this to be extremely useful in planning
        > voyages. The "Story Doctor" is my wife's site, and the "Blue
        > Heron's Nest" is mine, and is linked to from her front page.
        >
        > I've never built a boat this large before, and it's going to be a
        > challenge for me. I've already got the sides cut out for it, and
        > frames 1 through 6, but no assembly of the parts has began. You'll
        > notice a 8 foot model of the Tennessee, with a walk-thru cabin
        > arrangement, but the boat seems to be too narrow for that, so I'll
        > probably go with th standard design and closed cockpit like your
        > Esther Mae. Again, thanks for your help.
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
        com, "Chester
        > Young" <chester@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Dave:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The objects you have noticed are more correctly called 'squat
        > boards'. I do
        > > not have the book that described the difference between squat
        > boards and
        > > trim tabs at hand, but basically it amounts to squat boards not
        > having the
        > > ability to be adjusted. They were installed by the previous
        > owner, I do not
        > > know exactly why, but have opted to leave them in place for the
        > time being.
        > > They create a 1' plus extension to the hull and in no way
        > interfere with the
        > > operation of Esther Mae. I will attempt to get a better view of
        > the boards
        > > put in the Esther Mae photo album. Have you posted any photos of
        > your
        > > build? How about more details on your intended use and the boat
        > itself.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Caloosarat ~ the happy owner of Esther Mae, even if I did not
        > build my own.
        > > (But I was considering it before I was able to purchase one).
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _____
        > >
        > > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
        > [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com]
        On
        > Behalf Of
        > > musseler
        > > Sent: Saturday, September 23, 2006 3:39 PM
        > > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
        > > Subject: [bolger] Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > A couple of issues back, "Messing About In Boats" ran a Bolger
        > article
        > > on the Tennessee design. In the pictures that accompanied the
        > > article, I noticed something had been added to the stern of the
        > boat
        > > on both sides of the motor. I could not make out what the objects
        > > were, but guess they were either homemade trim tabs, or maybe
        swim
        > > platform steps. Does anyone have an explanation of these? Also, I
        > > had some other pictures of the Tennessee, and one of those boats
        > (an
        > > Aussie boat, I believe) had the same sort of transom additions.
        > > Puzzled Dave.........who is now in the process of building a
        > Tennessee.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • gravedigger20032003
        Chester, and other friends, I sympathise with your experience of accessing the forward portions of Tenniessie. You have much more real life experience with
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 10, 2006
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          Chester, and other friends,
          I sympathise with your experience of accessing the forward
          portions of Tenniessie. You have much more real life experience
          with one than I (considering mine is still being built...) You also
          appear to be considerably taller than I am. I decided early on to
          build mine with an open bow--not so much for seating, but for access
          and possibilities. The Columbia river can be rough--I've seen five
          foot waves and frequent white caps, but it is no ocean, and the
          Tennie is no open water boat. I'm thinking Thames picnic launches.
          Anyhow, I have extended the sleeping area in the cabin by having the
          bow seats watertight in the bow cockpit, thereby giving full
          sleeping length inside the cabin. I've also opened the bow cockpit
          deck just forward of frame 2, or just abaft frame one.
          Chester, a belated thank you for you kind words regarding the
          model I made. I love to see any pictres of your lovely boat that
          you post. It is very inspiring, as epoxy work is odious, laborious,
          and lengthy, and keeps me occupied.
          Finally, Friends, I should point out that Mr. Bolger did not
          approve of any changes I made--round stern, inboard engine, open
          bow, internal frames, no external chines--and asked that I not
          attribute it to them. Well, I'm no designer, and I built the thing
          from plans, so it requires a bit of mental prestidigitation for me
          to claim credit for an inspired design that I merely modified
          slightly.
          If I have two more weeks of 70 degree weather, I'll have that
          puppy bottom finished and flipped over. I can't believe how much
          epoxy it took to saturate the Dynel and fill the weave....and then
          the sanding to smooth it! Ouch! As I've said before, it's a good
          argument for more traditional boat building techniques.
          Tim
        • musseler
          Thanks Chester, It sounds like you have been crawling beneath the cabin roof through the bunks area to reach the forward hatch and then stand up? I m over 60
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Chester,

            It sounds like you have been crawling beneath the cabin roof through
            the bunks area to reach the forward hatch and then stand up? I'm
            over 60 and don't need to be crawling either. One of the Aussie
            versions has extended the cabin forward to frame 2 and shows
            a "hinged hatch" between frames 2 & 3, over the forward bunks
            section. This would make it a little easier to access the bow, but
            still involves stooping and crawling, and leaves you about 4 feet
            from the actual bow, but, the anchor work could probably be handled
            from there.

            I just received my order of stainless steel screws and ring-shanked
            nails day b4 yesterday, and plan to put the frame pieces together
            soon.

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Chester Young" <chester@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dave:
            >
            >
            >
            > I avoid going forward to the point of spending time drifting when
            anchor
            > might be a better option, if it is lunch or something I will set
            an anchor
            > from the stern. Stern anchoring also keeps the noise down and if
            it too
            > rough for that then you are in the wrong spot. Getting to the bow
            is a BIG
            > pain. My 40 something knees are not as young as they used to be
            and it is a
            > crawl to get there. I now have my hands on a hatch to be rebuilt
            and
            > installed up front. I like the idea of the open bow for ease of
            access and
            > there is no good use for the space under cover, it is too far
            forward to
            > place much weight and I suspect the original concept was to
            prevent people
            > from standing there and overloading the bow. Docking would
            benefit from
            > forward access, instead of just all gathering in the cockpit while
            I
            > practice crashing into stationary objects. To be fair, I am
            starting to get
            > good at making suggestions to Esther Mae on how to behave when
            approaching
            > the dock. So far I have not crashed in such fashion as leave a
            mark.
            >
            > The bottom of Esther Mae is two sheets of 3/8". I will have look
            at her
            > frames, I think they are ¾". One keel.
            >
            >
            >
            > Caloosarat
            >
            > If I would quit driving her around on the weekends then I could
            get some
            > work done, but then I would not be driving her would I?
            >
            > _____
            >
            > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of
            > musseler
            > Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 8:17 PM
            > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
            >
            >
            >
            > Chester,
            >
            > Thanks again for the pics, if I ever get her built I will
            experiment
            > with different squat board angles, they make a lot of sense to me.
            > Do you have much occasion to go forward to the bow to set the
            > anchor? Do you climb over the cabin, go around it, or go to the
            > forward hatch from within to get there? Also, did he use 1/2" ply
            or
            > 3/8" ply on the bottom? Are his frames 3/4" or did he opt for 1.5"
            > frames? Did he add extra bottom strakes or stick with the one keel
            > as Bolgers plan shows? Hope you don't mind a few questions,
            > Chester, but I want to get her built right the first time!
            > -- Dave
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
            com, "Chester
            > Young" <chester@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dave:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I have posted a couple of photos in the Esther Mae album. One
            > gives a good
            > > view of the boards with the boat at rest. Note the wire on the
            > port side;
            > > it leads to the transducer for the depth sounder. The black crud
            > is just
            > > that, crud from having the good fortune to put Esther Mae in the
            > water
            > > frequently enough that it grows. The rest of the boat has bottom
            > paint and
            > > does not exhibit near the growth that the squat boards do. I
            have
            > scrubbed
            > > the boards on a regular occasion.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > The other photo was standing on the stern looking down while
            > underway. Note
            > > the location of the transducer, the force of the water as it
            flows
            > under the
            > > squat boards is enough that the water bubbles up about 6" when
            > traveling at
            > > 5mph. I assume that it is even more at higher speed. This
            > indicates the
            > > amount of pressure that the squat boards experience, which says
            > that they
            > > are functioning as additional hull length. The boards extend
            > back form the
            > > stern at an angle slightly downward from the bottom of the boat
            > itself,
            > > adding potential lift when at speed.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I do not know if the boards made a difference once added. The
            > prior owner,
            > > died within a week of selling me the boat so I did not have the
            > chance to
            > > question him on this. I watched and waited for three years
            > before he
            > > would sell. His being sick was the only reason he entertained
            > selling. He
            > > called me because I am acquainted with his son and told to let
            me
            > know if
            > > his dad ever wanted to sell. I cannot blame him for holding on
            to
            > her for
            > > so long, who wouldn't?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Caloosarat
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > _____
            > >
            > > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
            > [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com]
            On
            > Behalf Of
            > > musseler
            > > Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:18 AM
            > > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
            > > Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Thanks Caloosarat,
            > > The "sqat boards" look to be set at an angle with the hull
            bottom,
            > > instead of following the hull bottom line, maybe the close-up
            > > pictures will show more about this. My build of the Tennessee
            will
            > > be called "June Marie" after my better half, of course, and I
            have
            > > some pictures of the shop & cutout frames posted at
            > > www.thestorydoctor.com/tpics/JuneMarie.htm If you go to
            > > www.thestorydoctor.com, be sure to look at the "Virtual Voyager"
            > > link, most people find this to be extremely useful in planning
            > > voyages. The "Story Doctor" is my wife's site, and the "Blue
            > > Heron's Nest" is mine, and is linked to from her front page.
            > >
            > > I've never built a boat this large before, and it's going to be
            a
            > > challenge for me. I've already got the sides cut out for it, and
            > > frames 1 through 6, but no assembly of the parts has began.
            You'll
            > > notice a 8 foot model of the Tennessee, with a walk-thru cabin
            > > arrangement, but the boat seems to be too narrow for that, so
            I'll
            > > probably go with th standard design and closed cockpit like your
            > > Esther Mae. Again, thanks for your help.
            > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
            > com, "Chester
            > > Young" <chester@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Dave:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > The objects you have noticed are more correctly called 'squat
            > > boards'. I do
            > > > not have the book that described the difference between squat
            > > boards and
            > > > trim tabs at hand, but basically it amounts to squat boards
            not
            > > having the
            > > > ability to be adjusted. They were installed by the previous
            > > owner, I do not
            > > > know exactly why, but have opted to leave them in place for
            the
            > > time being.
            > > > They create a 1' plus extension to the hull and in no way
            > > interfere with the
            > > > operation of Esther Mae. I will attempt to get a better view
            of
            > > the boards
            > > > put in the Esther Mae photo album. Have you posted any photos
            of
            > > your
            > > > build? How about more details on your intended use and the
            boat
            > > itself.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Caloosarat ~ the happy owner of Esther Mae, even if I did not
            > > build my own.
            > > > (But I was considering it before I was able to purchase one).
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > _____
            > > >
            > > > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
            > > [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
            com]
            > On
            > > Behalf Of
            > > > musseler
            > > > Sent: Saturday, September 23, 2006 3:39 PM
            > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
            > > > Subject: [bolger] Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > A couple of issues back, "Messing About In Boats" ran a Bolger
            > > article
            > > > on the Tennessee design. In the pictures that accompanied the
            > > > article, I noticed something had been added to the stern of
            the
            > > boat
            > > > on both sides of the motor. I could not make out what the
            objects
            > > > were, but guess they were either homemade trim tabs, or maybe
            > swim
            > > > platform steps. Does anyone have an explanation of these?
            Also, I
            > > > had some other pictures of the Tennessee, and one of those
            boats
            > > (an
            > > > Aussie boat, I believe) had the same sort of transom additions.
            > > > Puzzled Dave.........who is now in the process of building a
            > > Tennessee.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Chester Young
            Dave: There is no way I can get my 6’, 230 lbs through the small hatch in the bow. I crawl across the cabin from the hatch to get to the bow. That is why I
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 12, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Dave:



              There is no way I can get my 6’, 230 lbs through the small hatch in the bow.
              I crawl across the cabin from the hatch to get to the bow. That is why I
              have been looking for a hatch of sufficient size to get to the bow from
              underneath, I do not mind the bending and crawling as it is across the
              padded v-berth. Once the hatch is installed I will be able to kneel on the
              v-berth and reach to the anchor well enough. The cabin modification that I
              plan to do is to cut the #4 frame to create a berth on the port side. My
              wife is happy with the v-berth; I can hardly roll over without being trapped
              in the too narrow space.



              Caloosarat





              _____

              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              musseler
              Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 6:00 PM
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?



              Thanks Chester,

              It sounds like you have been crawling beneath the cabin roof through
              the bunks area to reach the forward hatch and then stand up? I'm
              over 60 and don't need to be crawling either. One of the Aussie
              versions has extended the cabin forward to frame 2 and shows
              a "hinged hatch" between frames 2 & 3, over the forward bunks
              section. This would make it a little easier to access the bow, but
              still involves stooping and crawling, and leaves you about 4 feet
              from the actual bow, but, the anchor work could probably be handled
              from there.

              I just received my order of stainless steel screws and ring-shanked
              nails day b4 yesterday, and plan to put the frame pieces together
              soon.

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Chester
              Young" <chester@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dave:
              >
              >
              >
              > I avoid going forward to the point of spending time drifting when
              anchor
              > might be a better option, if it is lunch or something I will set
              an anchor
              > from the stern. Stern anchoring also keeps the noise down and if
              it too
              > rough for that then you are in the wrong spot. Getting to the bow
              is a BIG
              > pain. My 40 something knees are not as young as they used to be
              and it is a
              > crawl to get there. I now have my hands on a hatch to be rebuilt
              and
              > installed up front. I like the idea of the open bow for ease of
              access and
              > there is no good use for the space under cover, it is too far
              forward to
              > place much weight and I suspect the original concept was to
              prevent people
              > from standing there and overloading the bow. Docking would
              benefit from
              > forward access, instead of just all gathering in the cockpit while
              I
              > practice crashing into stationary objects. To be fair, I am
              starting to get
              > good at making suggestions to Esther Mae on how to behave when
              approaching
              > the dock. So far I have not crashed in such fashion as leave a
              mark.
              >
              > The bottom of Esther Mae is two sheets of 3/8". I will have look
              at her
              > frames, I think they are ¾". One keel.
              >
              >
              >
              > Caloosarat
              >
              > If I would quit driving her around on the weekends then I could
              get some
              > work done, but then I would not be driving her would I?
              >
              > _____
              >
              > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
              Behalf Of
              > musseler
              > Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 8:17 PM
              > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              > Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
              >
              >
              >
              > Chester,
              >
              > Thanks again for the pics, if I ever get her built I will
              experiment
              > with different squat board angles, they make a lot of sense to me.
              > Do you have much occasion to go forward to the bow to set the
              > anchor? Do you climb over the cabin, go around it, or go to the
              > forward hatch from within to get there? Also, did he use 1/2" ply
              or
              > 3/8" ply on the bottom? Are his frames 3/4" or did he opt for 1.5"
              > frames? Did he add extra bottom strakes or stick with the one keel
              > as Bolgers plan shows? Hope you don't mind a few questions,
              > Chester, but I want to get her built right the first time!
              > -- Dave
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
              com, "Chester
              > Young" <chester@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Dave:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > I have posted a couple of photos in the Esther Mae album. One
              > gives a good
              > > view of the boards with the boat at rest. Note the wire on the
              > port side;
              > > it leads to the transducer for the depth sounder. The black crud
              > is just
              > > that, crud from having the good fortune to put Esther Mae in the
              > water
              > > frequently enough that it grows. The rest of the boat has bottom
              > paint and
              > > does not exhibit near the growth that the squat boards do. I
              have
              > scrubbed
              > > the boards on a regular occasion.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > The other photo was standing on the stern looking down while
              > underway. Note
              > > the location of the transducer, the force of the water as it
              flows
              > under the
              > > squat boards is enough that the water bubbles up about 6" when
              > traveling at
              > > 5mph. I assume that it is even more at higher speed. This
              > indicates the
              > > amount of pressure that the squat boards experience, which says
              > that they
              > > are functioning as additional hull length. The boards extend
              > back form the
              > > stern at an angle slightly downward from the bottom of the boat
              > itself,
              > > adding potential lift when at speed.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > I do not know if the boards made a difference once added. The
              > prior owner,
              > > died within a week of selling me the boat so I did not have the
              > chance to
              > > question him on this. I watched and waited for three years
              > before he
              > > would sell. His being sick was the only reason he entertained
              > selling. He
              > > called me because I am acquainted with his son and told to let
              me
              > know if
              > > his dad ever wanted to sell. I cannot blame him for holding on
              to
              > her for
              > > so long, who wouldn't?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Caloosarat
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > _____
              > >
              > > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              > [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com]
              On
              > Behalf Of
              > > musseler
              > > Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:18 AM
              > > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              > > Subject: [bolger] Re: Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Thanks Caloosarat,
              > > The "sqat boards" look to be set at an angle with the hull
              bottom,
              > > instead of following the hull bottom line, maybe the close-up
              > > pictures will show more about this. My build of the Tennessee
              will
              > > be called "June Marie" after my better half, of course, and I
              have
              > > some pictures of the shop & cutout frames posted at
              > > www.thestorydoctor.com/tpics/JuneMarie.htm If you go to
              > > www.thestorydoctor.com, be sure to look at the "Virtual Voyager"
              > > link, most people find this to be extremely useful in planning
              > > voyages. The "Story Doctor" is my wife's site, and the "Blue
              > > Heron's Nest" is mine, and is linked to from her front page.
              > >
              > > I've never built a boat this large before, and it's going to be
              a
              > > challenge for me. I've already got the sides cut out for it, and
              > > frames 1 through 6, but no assembly of the parts has began.
              You'll
              > > notice a 8 foot model of the Tennessee, with a walk-thru cabin
              > > arrangement, but the boat seems to be too narrow for that, so
              I'll
              > > probably go with th standard design and closed cockpit like your
              > > Esther Mae. Again, thanks for your help.
              > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
              > com, "Chester
              > > Young" <chester@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Dave:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > The objects you have noticed are more correctly called 'squat
              > > boards'. I do
              > > > not have the book that described the difference between squat
              > > boards and
              > > > trim tabs at hand, but basically it amounts to squat boards
              not
              > > having the
              > > > ability to be adjusted. They were installed by the previous
              > > owner, I do not
              > > > know exactly why, but have opted to leave them in place for
              the
              > > time being.
              > > > They create a 1' plus extension to the hull and in no way
              > > interfere with the
              > > > operation of Esther Mae. I will attempt to get a better view
              of
              > > the boards
              > > > put in the Esther Mae photo album. Have you posted any photos
              of
              > > your
              > > > build? How about more details on your intended use and the
              boat
              > > itself.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Caloosarat ~ the happy owner of Esther Mae, even if I did not
              > > build my own.
              > > > (But I was considering it before I was able to purchase one).
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > _____
              > > >
              > > > From: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              > > [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
              com]
              > On
              > > Behalf Of
              > > > musseler
              > > > Sent: Saturday, September 23, 2006 3:39 PM
              > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups. <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> com
              > > > Subject: [bolger] Trim tabs on a Tennessee?
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > A couple of issues back, "Messing About In Boats" ran a Bolger
              > > article
              > > > on the Tennessee design. In the pictures that accompanied the
              > > > article, I noticed something had been added to the stern of
              the
              > > boat
              > > > on both sides of the motor. I could not make out what the
              objects
              > > > were, but guess they were either homemade trim tabs, or maybe
              > swim
              > > > platform steps. Does anyone have an explanation of these?
              Also, I
              > > > had some other pictures of the Tennessee, and one of those
              boats
              > > (an
              > > > Aussie boat, I believe) had the same sort of transom additions.
              > > > Puzzled Dave.........who is now in the process of building a
              > > Tennessee.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





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