Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: sailing lug rigged

Expand Messages
  • Nels
    ... makers and boat designers. A screwed up violin produces a sour note, a screwed up boat can kill someone. Also some builders make changes without
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 29 11:23 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Carl" <shnarg@...> wrote:
      >
      > I can sugest a reason for the difference in responses from violin
      makers and boat designers. A screwed up violin produces a sour note,
      a screwed up boat can kill someone.

      Also some builders make changes without conferring with the designer
      and then blame the designer if it does not perform up to expectations.
      Then complain to others about how bad the design is.

      I think that rightly so, this can really upset the designer and
      perhaps damage their reputations unreasonably. Bolger states over and
      over that it is not a problem if people make changes. Just let him
      know and don't refer to it as a Bolger design any longer.

      Nels
    • Patrick Crockett
      Steve: On the daggerboard: I mentioned before that I have not seen any particular difference due to the daggerboard being on one side rather than in the middle
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 30 5:23 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Steve:

        On the daggerboard:

        I mentioned before that I have not seen any particular difference due to
        the daggerboard being on one side rather than in the middle or on both
        sides. There are two major advantages to having it on the side:

        1. More interior space, less shin-banging on tacks. The Windsprint
        bottom is just big enough to pitch a 1-person backpacking tent or
        mosquito net (like the REI Bug Hut II) and sleep aboard. That would be
        lost with a dagger board trunk in the center. Also, lounging about in
        the boat while underway is considerably more comfortable with the
        off-set board.

        2. It is structurally simpler. With a center daggerboard, you need a
        thwart or other bracing to keep the top of the trunk rigid. (Note,
        however, that, as drawn, the trunk may not be strong enough -- when I
        sailed with a rambunctious teen-aged nephew, he sat on the trunk to hike
        and wound up cracking it away from the side of the boat. The fix was to
        epoxy fiberglass tape into the joints with the side of the boat.)

        One major disadvantage of a daggerboard (as opposed to a pivoting
        centerboard, which would have to be moved farther inboard) is that when
        you run aground it is a bigger hassle to get the board up to sail off.
        An issue for me in the shallow North Carolina sounds.

        Patrick
      • GarthAB
        I built a Windsprint many years ago as my first boat. If I had it to do all over again, I d skip that off-center daggerboard and put on a Michalak-style
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 30 6:21 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          I built a Windsprint many years ago as my first boat. If I had it to
          do all over again, I'd skip that off-center daggerboard and put on a
          Michalak-style pivoting leeboard. Even more room in the cockpit, plus
          all the ease of running straight up on a beach (or over a submerged
          object) without the crunch-thud-stop of a daggerboard.

          Garth


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...> wrote:
          >
          > Steve:
          >
          > On the daggerboard:
          >
          > I mentioned before that I have not seen any particular difference
          due to
          > the daggerboard being on one side rather than in the middle or on both
          > sides. There are two major advantages to having it on the side:
          >
          > 1. More interior space, less shin-banging on tacks. The Windsprint
          > bottom is just big enough to pitch a 1-person backpacking tent or
          > mosquito net (like the REI Bug Hut II) and sleep aboard. That would be
          > lost with a dagger board trunk in the center. Also, lounging about in
          > the boat while underway is considerably more comfortable with the
          > off-set board.
          >
          > 2. It is structurally simpler. With a center daggerboard, you need a
          > thwart or other bracing to keep the top of the trunk rigid. (Note,
          > however, that, as drawn, the trunk may not be strong enough -- when I
          > sailed with a rambunctious teen-aged nephew, he sat on the trunk to
          hike
          > and wound up cracking it away from the side of the boat. The fix was to
          > epoxy fiberglass tape into the joints with the side of the boat.)
          >
          > One major disadvantage of a daggerboard (as opposed to a pivoting
          > centerboard, which would have to be moved farther inboard) is that when
          > you run aground it is a bigger hassle to get the board up to sail off.
          > An issue for me in the shallow North Carolina sounds.
          >
          > Patrick
          >
        • Doug
          I like pivoting leeboads or a pivoting keel if your using your boat for cruising. You can usually get enough board down to beat to some degree into a shallow
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 30 7:26 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            I like pivoting leeboads or a pivoting keel if your using your boat
            for cruising. You can usually get enough board down to beat to some
            degree into a shallow gunk hole or beat your way out. Seems to me you
            have to get a lot more board down with a dagger board and hitting
            bottom can damage your boat with no give in the daggerboard. The lee
            board orswing centerboard makes an nice break when v comming up to a
            dock in shallow water as well. Especilly for a larger boat where
            momentum can do damage if you hit the dock.
            I have been thinking about builge keels. I guess that's the right
            name . I'm talking about the keels or wings that come off the side of
            the boat. these would seem to be good with leeboards to hold the board
            off the boat, make it ridged and also add to her windward ability.

            Doug


            GarthAB wrote:
            >
            > I built a Windsprint many years ago as my first boat. If I had it to
            > do all over again, I'd skip that off-center daggerboard and put on a
            > Michalak-style pivoting leeboard. Even more room in the cockpit, plus
            > all the ease of running straight up on a beach (or over a submerged
            > object) without the crunch-thud-stop of a daggerboard.
            >
            > Garth
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Steve:
            > >
            > > On the daggerboard:
            > >
            > > I mentioned before that I have not seen any particular difference
            > due to
            > > the daggerboard being on one side rather than in the middle or on both
            > > sides. There are two major advantages to having it on the side:
            > >
            > > 1. More interior space, less shin-banging on tacks. The Windsprint
            > > bottom is just big enough to pitch a 1-person backpacking tent or
            > > mosquito net (like the REI Bug Hut II) and sleep aboard. That would be
            > > lost with a dagger board trunk in the center. Also, lounging about in
            > > the boat while underway is considerably more comfortable with the
            > > off-set board.
            > >
            > > 2. It is structurally simpler. With a center daggerboard, you need a
            > > thwart or other bracing to keep the top of the trunk rigid. (Note,
            > > however, that, as drawn, the trunk may not be strong enough -- when I
            > > sailed with a rambunctious teen-aged nephew, he sat on the trunk to
            > hike
            > > and wound up cracking it away from the side of the boat. The fix was to
            > > epoxy fiberglass tape into the joints with the side of the boat.)
            > >
            > > One major disadvantage of a daggerboard (as opposed to a pivoting
            > > centerboard, which would have to be moved farther inboard) is that when
            > > you run aground it is a bigger hassle to get the board up to sail off.
            > > An issue for me in the shallow North Carolina sounds.
            > >
            > > Patrick
            > >
            >
            >
          • Patrick Crockett
            Sorry to take so long to respond -- I d filed away the information pretty deep. I had my sail made by Brent Benson (Benson Sails), who mainly makes (made)
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 4, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Sorry to take so long to respond -- I'd filed away the information
              pretty deep. I had my sail made by Brent Benson (Benson Sails), who
              mainly makes (made) Lightning sails, I believe. His e-mail was
              bwb1@.... I don't know if that's current, though -- this was 10
              years ago. He was in Coopersburg, PA, USA.

              Patrick

              Nels wrote:
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Crockett <pcrockett@...> wrote:
              >
              >> Steven:
              >>
              >>
              > I
              > have a fully battened sail, and I think the battens mitigate some of the
              > sail distortion as it presses up against the mast. Without the battens,
              > the sail may draw better on the other tack.
              >
              > Hi Patrick,
              >
              > Great photos! Really shows the shape, and power of that sail. Where
              > did you get it made?
              >
              > Nels
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Bolger rules!!!
              > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
              > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
              > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
              > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.