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Re: [bolger] V belt transmission

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  • Doug
    I knew a fellow who used an electric clutch to stop one side of a small differential out of a 1941 Crosly Automobile. When the clutch was locked up the output
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 26, 2006
      I knew a fellow who used an electric clutch to stop one side of a small
      differential out of a 1941 Crosly Automobile. When the clutch was locked
      up the output shaft turned one direction and when it was released it
      turned the other direction. Worked pretty good. The same guy put a
      straight eight cylinder buick engine in a 40 ft work boat. The engine
      had a hydromatic transmition on it and the boat went down the river
      changing gears as speed required. Sounds nuts but he made a living
      catching crabs with it..

      Doug



      chodges31711 wrote:
      >
      > I was thinking of Robb White's belt drive. He had some trouble with
      > tension and with reverse. His engine moved on soft mounts to tighten or
      > loosen his belt.
      > I was trying to think of a way to have the engine firm and still use a
      > belt. Has anyone used an 12 volt electric clutch. They hold up very
      > well on auto AC and mowers. I had an Allis-Chalmers Gleaner Combine
      > that used one for the thresher (150 hp.). They have standard bores like
      > 1 inch.
      > If you put two clutches on the engine shaft one could be the main
      > drive. The other clutch could be lighter with an A section belt going
      > out to a pair of idlers and doing a twist coming back to the prop shaft
      > for reverse. If you offset the idlers slightly fore and aft the belt
      > will not rub on itself in the twist. Forward-Neutral-reverse would be
      > controlled by a double-throw-center-off toggle switch.
      > The reverse clutch would serve as a backup for the main clutch. If the
      > main clutch or belt failed, take the twist out of the reverse belt and
      > it becomes a forward drive.
      > Electric clutches and reversing belt twists are common in agricultural
      > and turf equipment. They should work in a boat.
      > Any comments?
      > I was thinking that a Rescue Minor bottom could be stretched to fit
      > Idaho top sides for a neat inboard installation.
      >
      > Charles
      >
      >
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