Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Bolger commisions. Anybody seen any completed in the last 2 years?

Expand Messages
  • donschultz8275
    I ve bought a set of Bolger plans which I knew were complete (Hawkeye) in the last year or so and received them promptly. But it seems to me I ve not heard of
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 4, 2006
      I've bought a set of Bolger plans which I knew were complete (Hawkeye)
      in the last year or so and received them promptly.

      But it seems to me I've not heard of anybody receiving completion of
      new work commisioned for over two years. Anybody gotten their work
      completed?

      My point/concern is that PB&F is no longer producing new work, and
      they are not prepared to share their status and likely future with
      their customers.

      Don Schultz
    • Bruce Hallman
      If I am not mistaken, Phil Bolger is nearing his 80th birthday plus or minus a few weeks. Does anybody know his exact birthday date? August ??, 1927 A
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4, 2006
        If I am not mistaken, Phil Bolger is nearing his 80th birthday plus or
        minus a few weeks.

        Does anybody know his exact birthday date? August ??, 1927

        A parallel question is: Which was the last new commission he has undertaken?
        Per my limited knowledge, he has declined all offers in the last couple years.

        The last 'big' design completed (that I can think of)
        is the low power 70'x14'x3' New England Fishing Vessel
        and from reading that article, SA appears to have played
        a large part in the design role.

        In National Fisherman, Sept 2004 v85i5 p42(3)

        http://www.gloucestermaritimecenter.org/pdfs/newsfa04.pdf

        Or, was it that large Proa? Does anybody have the stats for that Proa
        to put into the design database?



        On 8/4/06, donschultz8275 <donschultz@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've bought a set of Bolger plans which I knew were complete (Hawkeye)
        > in the last year or so and received them promptly.
        >
        > But it seems to me I've not heard of anybody receiving completion of
        > new work commisioned for over two years. Anybody gotten their work
        > completed?
        >
        > My point/concern is that PB&F is no longer producing new work, and
        > they are not prepared to share their status and likely future with
        > their customers.
        >
        > Don Schultz
      • graeme19121984
        ... Looks as if PB&F are still much exercised by the environmental, social, and economic fishing sustainability issues, and the associated politics, at least
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 6, 2006
          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
          >
          > The last 'big' design completed (that I can think of)
          > is the low power 70'x14'x3' New England Fishing Vessel
          > and from reading that article, SA appears to have played
          > a large part in the design role.

          Looks as if PB&F are still much exercised by the environmental,
          social, and economic fishing sustainability issues, and the
          associated politics, at least as at Nov/Dec 2005. Their feedback
          letter to E magazine:

          "In all the recent discussion about commercial fishing, we note the
          absence of any reference to the importance of vessel design itself
          in terms of sustainability. In your articles, Rod Fujita comes close
          and yet stops short.

          At Phil Bolger and Friends, we have proposed since 2002 an
          ecologically and economically advanced vessel. Based on a low-
          horsepower, long, lean, unsinkable, offshore-capable geometry, this
          could be built and maintained locally—using mostly renewable
          resources—and would be highly fuel-efficient. By putting fishermen
          in smaller, cheaper boats, they will be able to support themselves
          catching fewer fish. The pressure to beat quotas will be reduced,
          since fishermen won't have as much debt as they did with larger
          boats.

          Despite the inherent logic of this rather uncomplicated approach to
          sustainability, we know of no institutions, organizations or
          advocacy groups pursuing research along those lines. And the
          Magnusson-Stevenson Act actually forces less sustainable fishing
          boat designs in its codified incomprehension of basic naval
          engineering. Put polemically, it classifies a 60-foot long, 600-
          horsepower trawler the same way as a 60-foot, eight-oared rowing
          shell!

          Since 2002, we've offered our local fleet pro bono design proposals.
          And even with state and federal R&D funding within reach, there's
          been next to no interest. Everyone else seems to be preoccupied
          cursing "eco-terrorists" and chanting for "more fish." In this
          context, the Bush administration's ocean policies seem among the
          smaller obstacles.
          Susanne Altenburger Phil Bolger and Friends Gloucester, MA "
          http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2916 (third letter from top)

          Here's a part of the interview of Rod Fujita (who didn't go far
          enough):

          "..Right now I'm engaged in various attempts to get the trawl sector
          under control. Various scientific studies have shown that trawling
          is quite a damaging way to harvest fish, but my take on it is that
          it's really a logical manifestation of the way we manage our
          fisheries. It's not that trawlers are by nature rapacious or greedy.
          They're doing the rational thing when you examine the incentives
          that they face. Nobody tells them what their share of the catch
          ought to be. There's no incentive to conserve, obviously, because
          any fish that they don't catch is going to be caught by somebody
          else.

          So it's kind of inevitable, really, that people will build bigger
          and bigger boats and buy more boats and use bigger and bigger gear
          that's more powerful to maximize their share of the catch. One
          project that we're engaged in is trying to reform that system of
          management so that the incentives to over-exploit the resources will
          be replaced by incentives to conserve the resource.

          What specifically needs to be done?

          There's a couple of different ways we're working on that. One
          project is to change the management regime to a system of catch
          shares so that the fishermen receive a percentage of the allowable
          catch and can plan their fishing business around that share in a
          more rational way. They can get more money by catching fewer fish
          and causing less damage to the habitat. "
          http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2644
          http://www.emagazine.com/?issue=94&toc
          Graeme
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.