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Anhinga (or Rubens) by Numbers

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  • graeme19121984
    Phillip Bolger seems to do things for a reason. He conducts his design work in a deliberative, and purposeful way. I ve been trying to come to terms with some
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1, 2006
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      Phillip Bolger seems to do things for a reason. He conducts his
      design work in a deliberative, and purposeful way. I've been trying
      to come to terms with some of the many layered considerations of the
      Bolger design. Here's just a few, seems there's more.

      Centuries are important markers. Quarter centuries, half centuries,
      ten centuries. Best or biggest of the century. 100mph, "the ton".
      For PCB a century approached. The #400 design. He thought to mark it
      special, and with this number would celebrate his mastery of sharpie
      design. However, in PCB's opinion, others may differ, the design did
      not come up to scratch. The intended design "Wish ll" instead got
      #399. (What got the "400"? The Bolger classic, soon to be
      contentious, "June Bug".) Centuries.

      The design "Centennial ll" came after "Centennial", marking a
      bicentennial.

      "Eeek!", a model with an unusual and experimental stern combined
      with a tried and tested Bolger-waterflow-theory sharpie bow, came
      a century after another design,"Odd Lot", with another unusual stern
      backed onto a proven bow. The two ends had to suit unusual service
      requirements. "Eeek!" at #407 was a hundred designs exactly
      after "Odd Lot" at #307, the two designs sharing in common the fact
      that their front and back ends match was "odd". By this century did
      PCB mark a wry, cryptic jest, knowing the back end of "Eeek" will
      seem odd to some? Perhaps so, but in "Eeek!" I think he was
      pondering on more than a stated design idea for a proposed economy
      sea-going cruiser.He also pondered both the problem of the
      homebult "Dovekie", which would lead to "Birdwatcher", and on how to
      further simplify L F Herreshoff's seagoing cruiser "Rozinante".
      "Birdwatcher" would become a truly innovative simplification in the
      spirit of "Rozinante", where yet again "less is more", but on the
      way another simplification of "Rozinante" would be marked by noting
      another century. A larger version of the cruising canoe "Eeek!"
      would be marked out.

      "Anhinga" at #484 came 100 designs after "Burgandy",
      which was a model to serve the same purpose as "Rozinante" the
      heroine of L Francis Herroshoff's "The Compleat Cruiser". Nearly
      all that LFH writes about the "Rozinante" in that book, pages 94 to
      108, as well as the spirit behind the design of "Burgandy", is
      in "Anhinga". The three boats have many similar features from
      similar accomodations, waterline shape and dimensions, on up.

      {"...Bolger has an intense personal and professional involvement
      with definitive. It is a thing he's been thinking about all his
      life, but with an independent point of view he once wrote about in
      these pages (Nautical Quarterly) in discussing Francis
      Herreshoff: "L.FH. thought himself a lesser man than his father. . .
      He had no hesitation in imitating his father's designs (but never
      those of Burgess). More often, though, there is hardly a trace of
      his father's influence; the designs reflect an entirely different
      line of thought. It's surely remarkable that after 27 years of
      exposure to such a man as Nathanael Herreshoff, Francis Herreshoff
      remained so tranquil in mind that he strained neither to be like his
      father nor to be different."... Phil Bolger is like that...

      ..."I love to simplify things," Bolger says of his work. `And I
      think this is a minority outlook. I think the majority impulse is to
      make things more complicated." Even this statement is more
      complicated, the spokesman notwithstanding..." (Joseph Gribbens,
      Nautical Quarterly 21, Spring 1983,
      http://hallman.org/bolger/BolgerBio.html ) }

      Makes me wonder.

      The "Proposed Economy Seagoing Cruiser" would be number... what?
      Any need for "Sancho Panza"?

      Graeme... sometimes doing the numbers for "Anhinga"...a boat, if
      built, he may name 'Bolger-it-is' for obvious reasons, or 'Onion' as
      in "peeling" back un-obvious layers, more all the time.... (these
      box boats are deceptively simple; are more than they appear)
    • Sam Glasscock
      I recently asked the group for advice about stretching a tortoise or brick for a 1000 lb capicity tender/dinghy. I posed the same question to PB&F. Bolger
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 2, 2006
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        I recently asked the group for advice about stretching
        a tortoise or brick for a 1000 lb capicity
        tender/dinghy. I posed the same question to PB&F.
        Bolger recommended the June Bug instead. Graeme in
        his post on Bolger designs calls June Bug
        'contentious.' Is that becuase of looks, or
        performance? Anybody built a JB, or have thoughts on
        her? She is longer than I had though to use, but
        would fit over my deckhouse and cockpit like a glove.
        Sam

        --- graeme19121984 <graeme19121984@...>
        wrote:

        > Phillip Bolger seems to do things for a reason. He
        > conducts his
        > design work in a deliberative, and purposeful way.
        > I've been trying
        > to come to terms with some of the many layered
        > considerations of the
        > Bolger design. Here's just a few, seems there's
        > more.
        >
        > Centuries are important markers. Quarter centuries,
        > half centuries,
        > ten centuries. Best or biggest of the century.
        > 100mph, "the ton".
        > For PCB a century approached. The #400 design. He
        > thought to mark it
        > special, and with this number would celebrate his
        > mastery of sharpie
        > design. However, in PCB's opinion, others may
        > differ, the design did
        > not come up to scratch. The intended design "Wish
        > ll" instead got
        > #399. (What got the "400"? The Bolger classic, soon
        > to be
        > contentious, "June Bug".) Centuries.
        >
        > The design "Centennial ll" came after "Centennial",
        > marking a
        > bicentennial.
        >
        > "Eeek!", a model with an unusual and experimental
        > stern combined
        > with a tried and tested Bolger-waterflow-theory
        > sharpie bow, came
        > a century after another design,"Odd Lot", with
        > another unusual stern
        > backed onto a proven bow. The two ends had to suit
        > unusual service
        > requirements. "Eeek!" at #407 was a hundred designs
        > exactly
        > after "Odd Lot" at #307, the two designs sharing in
        > common the fact
        > that their front and back ends match was "odd". By
        > this century did
        > PCB mark a wry, cryptic jest, knowing the back end
        > of "Eeek" will
        > seem odd to some? Perhaps so, but in "Eeek!" I think
        > he was
        > pondering on more than a stated design idea for a
        > proposed economy
        > sea-going cruiser.He also pondered both the problem
        > of the
        > homebult "Dovekie", which would lead to
        > "Birdwatcher", and on how to
        > further simplify L F Herreshoff's seagoing cruiser
        > "Rozinante".
        > "Birdwatcher" would become a truly innovative
        > simplification in the
        > spirit of "Rozinante", where yet again "less is
        > more", but on the
        > way another simplification of "Rozinante" would be
        > marked by noting
        > another century. A larger version of the cruising
        > canoe "Eeek!"
        > would be marked out.
        >
        > "Anhinga" at #484 came 100 designs after "Burgandy",
        >
        > which was a model to serve the same purpose as
        > "Rozinante" the
        > heroine of L Francis Herroshoff's "The Compleat
        > Cruiser". Nearly
        > all that LFH writes about the "Rozinante" in that
        > book, pages 94 to
        > 108, as well as the spirit behind the design of
        > "Burgandy", is
        > in "Anhinga". The three boats have many similar
        > features from
        > similar accomodations, waterline shape and
        > dimensions, on up.
        >
        > {"...Bolger has an intense personal and professional
        > involvement
        > with definitive. It is a thing he's been thinking
        > about all his
        > life, but with an independent point of view he once
        > wrote about in
        > these pages (Nautical Quarterly) in discussing
        > Francis
        > Herreshoff: "L.FH. thought himself a lesser man than
        > his father. . .
        > He had no hesitation in imitating his father's
        > designs (but never
        > those of Burgess). More often, though, there is
        > hardly a trace of
        > his father's influence; the designs reflect an
        > entirely different
        > line of thought. It's surely remarkable that after
        > 27 years of
        > exposure to such a man as Nathanael Herreshoff,
        > Francis Herreshoff
        > remained so tranquil in mind that he strained
        > neither to be like his
        > father nor to be different."... Phil Bolger is like
        > that...
        >
        > ..."I love to simplify things," Bolger says of his
        > work. `And I
        > think this is a minority outlook. I think the
        > majority impulse is to
        > make things more complicated." Even this statement
        > is more
        > complicated, the spokesman notwithstanding..."
        > (Joseph Gribbens,
        > Nautical Quarterly 21, Spring 1983,
        > http://hallman.org/bolger/BolgerBio.html ) }
        >
        > Makes me wonder.
        >
        > The "Proposed Economy Seagoing Cruiser" would be
        > number... what?
        > Any need for "Sancho Panza"?
        >
        > Graeme... sometimes doing the numbers for
        > "Anhinga"...a boat, if
        > built, he may name 'Bolger-it-is' for obvious
        > reasons, or 'Onion' as
        > in "peeling" back un-obvious layers, more all the
        > time.... (these
        > box boats are deceptively simple; are more than they
        > appear)
        >
        >
        >
        >


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      • Howard Stephenson
        Payson s Building the New Instant Boats provides a blow-by-blow account of building the 14 JB. It seems quite a few have been built. Bolger wanted the design
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 2, 2006
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          Payson's "Building the New Instant Boats"provides a blow-by-blow
          account of building the 14' JB. It seems quite a few have been built.
          Bolger wanted the design to be the best compromise between capacity
          (1,000lb), stability and capability under oars or sail. The caption
          under a photo of her sailing under her 59 sq.ft. triangular sprit sail
          says "What June Bug lacks in looks she makes up for in performance".
          Payson says she carries a load well and has no vices.

          Payson's text indicates that the design was contentious only because
          of the lack of flare in the sides. The appearance of the design in an
          issue of "Small Boat Journal" prompted letters to the editor for and
          against the plumb sides.

          You could build the boat from the plans in the book.

          Howard

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I recently asked the group for advice about stretching
          > a tortoise or brick for a 1000 lb capicity
          > tender/dinghy. I posed the same question to PB&F.
          > Bolger recommended the June Bug instead. Graeme in
          > his post on Bolger designs calls June Bug
          > 'contentious.' Is that becuase of looks, or
          > performance? Anybody built a JB, or have thoughts on
          > her? She is longer than I had though to use, but
          > would fit over my deckhouse and cockpit like a glove.
          > Sam
        • graeme19121984
          What Howard said, Sam. Aparently, June Bug stirred up a lot of contention at the time, and especially after the design was published in Small Boat Journal.
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 3, 2006
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            What Howard said, Sam. Aparently, June Bug stirred up a lot of
            contention at the time, and especially after the design was
            published in Small Boat Journal. People canceled their subscription,
            I believe, and some said Bolger, or the journal had lost sight of
            what a boat should be, and so on.

            Like Thomas Firth Jones wrote in his essay about appreciating Bolger
            (New Plywood Boats), "...With the instant boats the same esthetic
            sense is operating (as when drawing a traditional boat), but on too
            sophisticated a level for many people to percieve. Bolger is
            something like Picasso: everybody moons about his blue period, but
            most people whine about his later work. They do not see that his eye
            for beauty, better trained than theirs, has gone beyond what they
            are capable of appreciating... The June Bug is exactly the kind of
            instant boat that pulls so many people's chain... (in) 30-Odd Boats
            Bolger defends her against the 'purists', who would compromise her
            utility - her large carrying capacity combined with small overall
            dimensions - for the sake of some preconceived esthetic standard."

            I wasn't being contentious about JB myself, just meant to make a
            side point that she got the *big* fourth century given to her over
            and above a boat, Wish ll, that PCB called "plain ugly", and then
            there was much contention stirred up anyway. ( Now, personally, I
            think I'd contend PCB's opinion on Wish ll. I don't think it is in
            any way particularly ugly, and in many ways is a fine boat
            possessing a number of handy features that make her stand out over
            the comparable Long Micro for instance.)

            As for stretching a Tortoise or Brick: Brick could be stretched, and
            would row faster, though the sides would still be too high for good
            rowing. The Brick take-off, Puddleduck Racer, with the right
            freeboard and length may do. There's a chart at the PD website that
            may give you better ideas as to length and load capacity. Look to
            the bottom of the left side menu for "Other Hull Variations",
            halfway down that page under the heading 'Designing Other Hulls'.
            http://www.pdracer.com/

            If June Bug will fit like a glove, and is PCB recommended, then it
            would be really hard to beat. People that have them say they're
            great.

            Graeme
          • Sam Glasscock
            I ll bet PB was tickled by the whole June Bug controversy. Here is my reservation about June Bug, and my crazy idea. I wanted a tender that could take my 3hp
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 3, 2006
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              I'll bet PB was tickled by the whole June Bug
              controversy.
              Here is my reservation about June Bug, and my
              crazy idea. I wanted a tender that could take my 3hp
              evinrude lightwin outboard. This little motor weighs
              only 30-odd pounds and is direct drive(no
              neutral/reverse gears) and can swivel all the way
              around its clamp for reverse. JB is not designed to
              take an outboard on the transom. I am considering
              beefing up the gunwale area above the stern seat, and
              side mounting the engine. With the plumb sides and
              flat bottom there ought to be plenty of buoyancy under
              the chine to support the weight, and at the
              displacement speeds I am looking for there should not
              be much of a control problem. It sounds like fun, and
              I just might do it, too. Sam

              --- graeme19121984 <graeme19121984@...>
              wrote:

              > What Howard said, Sam. Aparently, June Bug stirred
              > up a lot of
              > contention at the time, and especially after the
              > design was
              > published in Small Boat Journal. People canceled
              > their subscription,
              > I believe, and some said Bolger, or the journal had
              > lost sight of
              > what a boat should be, and so on.


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            • Lewis E. Gordon
              Sam, For June Bug, your outboard idea might not be too crazy. There is that nice combing across the front of the rear deck which could be reinforced to take
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 3, 2006
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                Sam,

                For June Bug, your outboard idea might not be too crazy. There is that
                nice combing across the front of the rear deck which could be
                reinforced to take the thrust loads, and the rearmost oarlock socket
                is just a short distance forward. I can picture a drop in place motor
                bracket notched to fit over the combing and pinned to drop into the
                oarlock socket and clamped to the stern seat. All this on the port
                side of course since I just never learned to control a tiller with my
                right hand. I guess that is why I'm not a sailor.

                Lewis

                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'll bet PB was tickled by the whole June Bug
                > controversy.
                > Here is my reservation about June Bug, and my
                > crazy idea. I wanted a tender that could take my 3hp
                > evinrude lightwin outboard. This little motor weighs
                > only 30-odd pounds and is direct drive(no
                > neutral/reverse gears) and can swivel all the way
                > around its clamp for reverse. JB is not designed to
                > take an outboard on the transom. I am considering
                > beefing up the gunwale area above the stern seat, and
                > side mounting the engine. With the plumb sides and
                > flat bottom there ought to be plenty of buoyancy under
                > the chine to support the weight, and at the
                > displacement speeds I am looking for there should not
                > be much of a control problem. It sounds like fun, and
                > I just might do it, too. Sam
                >
                > --- graeme19121984 <graeme19121984@...>
                > wrote:
                >
                > > What Howard said, Sam. Aparently, June Bug stirred
                > > up a lot of
                > > contention at the time, and especially after the
                > > design was
                > > published in Small Boat Journal. People canceled
                > > their subscription,
                > > I believe, and some said Bolger, or the journal had
                > > lost sight of
                > > what a boat should be, and so on.
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
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                >
              • Sam Glasscock
                Good ideas, Lewis. I believe I would make the coaming into a full bulkhead and run the seat back to it to make a girder. That ought to give her sufficient
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 3, 2006
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                  Good ideas, Lewis. I believe I would make the coaming
                  into a full bulkhead and run the seat back to it to
                  make a girder. That ought to give her sufficient
                  stiffness for the little bit of thrust I'll be
                  employing.

                  --- "Lewis E. Gordon" <l_gordon_nica@...> wrote:

                  > Sam,
                  >
                  > For June Bug, your outboard idea might not be too
                  > crazy. There is that
                  > nice combing across the front of the rear deck which
                  > could be
                  > reinforced to take the thrust loads, and the
                  > rearmost oarlock socket
                  > is just a short distance forward. I can picture a
                  > drop in place motor
                  > bracket notched to fit over the combing and pinned
                  > to drop into the
                  > oarlock socket and clamped to the stern seat. All
                  > this on the port
                  > side of course since I just never learned to control
                  > a tiller with my
                  > right hand. I guess that is why I'm not a sailor.
                  >
                  > Lewis
                  >
                  > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock
                  > <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I'll bet PB was tickled by the whole June Bug
                  > > controversy.
                  > > Here is my reservation about June Bug, and my
                  > > crazy idea. I wanted a tender that could take my
                  > 3hp
                  > > evinrude lightwin outboard. This little motor
                  > weighs
                  > > only 30-odd pounds and is direct drive(no
                  > > neutral/reverse gears) and can swivel all the way
                  > > around its clamp for reverse. JB is not designed
                  > to
                  > > take an outboard on the transom. I am considering
                  > > beefing up the gunwale area above the stern seat,
                  > and
                  > > side mounting the engine. With the plumb sides
                  > and
                  > > flat bottom there ought to be plenty of buoyancy
                  > under
                  > > the chine to support the weight, and at the
                  > > displacement speeds I am looking for there should
                  > not
                  > > be much of a control problem. It sounds like fun,
                  > and
                  > > I just might do it, too. Sam
                  > >
                  > > --- graeme19121984 <graeme19121984@...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > What Howard said, Sam. Aparently, June Bug
                  > stirred
                  > > > up a lot of
                  > > > contention at the time, and especially after the
                  > > > design was
                  > > > published in Small Boat Journal. People canceled
                  > > > their subscription,
                  > > > I believe, and some said Bolger, or the journal
                  > had
                  > > > lost sight of
                  > > > what a boat should be, and so on.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > __________________________________________________
                  > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > protection around
                  > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


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