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Re: [bolger] Digest Number 2964

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  • Sam Glasscock
    Chris, you have given me a lot to think about. The deck house is on a Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper, a salmon-troller type boat. It has a high motor-vessel type
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 28, 2006
      Chris, you have given me a lot to think about. The
      deck house is on a Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper, a
      salmon-troller type boat. It has a high motor-vessel
      type house, and I would like to keep it painted. What
      if I strip it to the extent possible, hit all the bare
      wood with an epoxy sealer, then overcoat with a good
      latex primer and acrylic topcoat? I have always used
      latex on the topsides and superstructure of ply-epoxy
      boats with good results, but this is my first real
      wooden boat, and I had assumed (maybe wrongly) that
      oil-based marine paint was better for the topside
      planking, cabin and housesides.

      --- Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:

      > Don't do it. Really. Latex paint (assuming you've
      > got acrylic "latex"
      > on her) is made to be flexible. It is quite
      > dynamic, and this is a
      > good, good thing. Putting oil-based paint on top of
      > her is a bad match.
      > The reason is that oil-based paints are not as
      > flexible, and as a
      > result, they will check and flake off. You must
      > match your primer to
      > your topcoat. While you can occasionally get away
      > with latex over
      > oil-primer, you should not attempt oil over latex
      > primer.
      >
      > I agree that the perfect is the enemy of the good.
      > But the crappy is
      > the enemy of the good, too, and that's what you'll
      > have on your hands.
      >
      > Your deckhouse is teak boards? Alas, too bad it's
      > not a teak veneer
      > (like a Frisco Flyer).
      >
      > You could stick with latex, but you still wouldn't
      > be out of the woods.
      > I would strip her as much as is possible in a single
      > day. That should
      > be a lot. Then, I would degrease her as much as
      > possible--that means
      > lots of acetone and scrubbing. Then, a top quality
      > exterior latex
      > primer (I happen to favor Kilz II, which is thick
      > and flexible). Then a
      > topcoat or two of your choice. I believe that latex
      > primer can stick to
      > teak with proper preparation. It's not the easiest
      > and it's not the
      > best, but it would probably work.
      >

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