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Re: [bolger] Digest Number 2964

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  • Chris Crandall
    Don t do it. Really. Latex paint (assuming you ve got acrylic latex on her) is made to be flexible. It is quite dynamic, and this is a good, good thing.
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 28, 2006
      Don't do it. Really. Latex paint (assuming you've got acrylic "latex"
      on her) is made to be flexible. It is quite dynamic, and this is a
      good, good thing. Putting oil-based paint on top of her is a bad match.
      The reason is that oil-based paints are not as flexible, and as a
      result, they will check and flake off. You must match your primer to
      your topcoat. While you can occasionally get away with latex over
      oil-primer, you should not attempt oil over latex primer.

      I agree that the perfect is the enemy of the good. But the crappy is
      the enemy of the good, too, and that's what you'll have on your hands.

      Your deckhouse is teak boards? Alas, too bad it's not a teak veneer
      (like a Frisco Flyer).

      You could stick with latex, but you still wouldn't be out of the woods.
      I would strip her as much as is possible in a single day. That should
      be a lot. Then, I would degrease her as much as possible--that means
      lots of acetone and scrubbing. Then, a top quality exterior latex
      primer (I happen to favor Kilz II, which is thick and flexible). Then a
      topcoat or two of your choice. I believe that latex primer can stick to
      teak with proper preparation. It's not the easiest and it's not the
      best, but it would probably work.

      However, what you *really* should do is strip her down to the wood, and
      do *no* topcoat finishing. Just wash her with soap and water twice a
      year (gently). As you probably already know, teak alternates between
      soft and hard early/latewood, and stiff bristles can dig out the soft
      stuff. Maybe 3M pads, but not stiff plastic bristles.

      If you really want to seal the teak up, I would use a shellac first.
      That will seal up the oils. Then, an oil-based primer, then oil-based
      paint. You can do the same thing with epoxy, of course, and you can put
      any finish you like on top of epoxy (well, not Cetol, but I assume you
      aren't as crazy and tasteless as that).


      > I have a deckhouse which is made of teak boards. It
      > was painted by a previous owner with what I believe to
      > be latex paint. It didn't stick worth a darn to the
      > oily teak, but where it was over intact paint (the
      > majority of the house) it is in good shape. The best
      > bet would be to strip all the paint off and start
      > fresh, but on the theory that the perfect is the enemy
      > of the good (aka Glasscock's laziness principle) I
      > would like to leave she tight stuff in place. I
      > assume oil-based urethane is what I need over the
      > teak, but I don't know how well it will stick to the
      > latex. Any help/educated guess/speculation will be
      > gratefully accepted. Sam
      >
    • Doug
      Along this same line has anyone tried pure acrylic over latex acrylic primer. I primed the interior of my Elver with Latex acrylic thinking to finsh with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 28, 2006
        Along this same line has anyone tried pure acrylic over latex acrylic
        primer. I primed the interior of my Elver with Latex acrylic thinking to
        finsh with the same in a finish coat. Since some are saying use 100%
        acrlicr have been thinking about using pure acrylic as a finish coat.
        Any body have any experience with this. This might be better than the
        oil paint in this thread.


        Doug


        Chris Crandall wrote:
        >
        > Don't do it. Really. Latex paint (assuming you've got acrylic "latex"
        > on her) is made to be flexible. It is quite dynamic, and this is a
        > good, good thing. Putting oil-based paint on top of her is a bad match.
        > The reason is that oil-based paints are not as flexible, and as a
        > result, they will check and flake off. You must match your primer to
        > your topcoat. While you can occasionally get away with latex over
        > oil-primer, you should not attempt oil over latex primer.
        >
        > I agree that the perfect is the enemy of the good. But the crappy is
        > the enemy of the good, too, and that's what you'll have on your hands.
        >
        > Your deckhouse is teak boards? Alas, too bad it's not a teak veneer
        > (like a Frisco Flyer).
        >
        > You could stick with latex, but you still wouldn't be out of the woods.
        > I would strip her as much as is possible in a single day. That should
        > be a lot. Then, I would degrease her as much as possible--that means
        > lots of acetone and scrubbing. Then, a top quality exterior latex
        > primer (I happen to favor Kilz II, which is thick and flexible). Then a
        > topcoat or two of your choice. I believe that latex primer can stick to
        > teak with proper preparation. It's not the easiest and it's not the
        > best, but it would probably work.
        >
        > However, what you *really* should do is strip her down to the wood, and
        > do *no* topcoat finishing. Just wash her with soap and water twice a
        > year (gently). As you probably already know, teak alternates between
        > soft and hard early/latewood, and stiff bristles can dig out the soft
        > stuff. Maybe 3M pads, but not stiff plastic bristles.
        >
        > If you really want to seal the teak up, I would use a shellac first.
        > That will seal up the oils. Then, an oil-based primer, then oil-based
        > paint. You can do the same thing with epoxy, of course, and you can put
        > any finish you like on top of epoxy (well, not Cetol, but I assume you
        > aren't as crazy and tasteless as that).
        >
        > > I have a deckhouse which is made of teak boards. It
        > > was painted by a previous owner with what I believe to
        > > be latex paint. It didn't stick worth a darn to the
        > > oily teak, but where it was over intact paint (the
        > > majority of the house) it is in good shape. The best
        > > bet would be to strip all the paint off and start
        > > fresh, but on the theory that the perfect is the enemy
        > > of the good (aka Glasscock's laziness principle) I
        > > would like to leave she tight stuff in place. I
        > > assume oil-based urethane is what I need over the
        > > teak, but I don't know how well it will stick to the
        > > latex. Any help/educated guess/speculation will be
        > > gratefully accepted. Sam
        > >
        >
        >
      • Sam Glasscock
        Chris, you have given me a lot to think about. The deck house is on a Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper, a salmon-troller type boat. It has a high motor-vessel type
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 28, 2006
          Chris, you have given me a lot to think about. The
          deck house is on a Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper, a
          salmon-troller type boat. It has a high motor-vessel
          type house, and I would like to keep it painted. What
          if I strip it to the extent possible, hit all the bare
          wood with an epoxy sealer, then overcoat with a good
          latex primer and acrylic topcoat? I have always used
          latex on the topsides and superstructure of ply-epoxy
          boats with good results, but this is my first real
          wooden boat, and I had assumed (maybe wrongly) that
          oil-based marine paint was better for the topside
          planking, cabin and housesides.

          --- Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:

          > Don't do it. Really. Latex paint (assuming you've
          > got acrylic "latex"
          > on her) is made to be flexible. It is quite
          > dynamic, and this is a
          > good, good thing. Putting oil-based paint on top of
          > her is a bad match.
          > The reason is that oil-based paints are not as
          > flexible, and as a
          > result, they will check and flake off. You must
          > match your primer to
          > your topcoat. While you can occasionally get away
          > with latex over
          > oil-primer, you should not attempt oil over latex
          > primer.
          >
          > I agree that the perfect is the enemy of the good.
          > But the crappy is
          > the enemy of the good, too, and that's what you'll
          > have on your hands.
          >
          > Your deckhouse is teak boards? Alas, too bad it's
          > not a teak veneer
          > (like a Frisco Flyer).
          >
          > You could stick with latex, but you still wouldn't
          > be out of the woods.
          > I would strip her as much as is possible in a single
          > day. That should
          > be a lot. Then, I would degrease her as much as
          > possible--that means
          > lots of acetone and scrubbing. Then, a top quality
          > exterior latex
          > primer (I happen to favor Kilz II, which is thick
          > and flexible). Then a
          > topcoat or two of your choice. I believe that latex
          > primer can stick to
          > teak with proper preparation. It's not the easiest
          > and it's not the
          > best, but it would probably work.
          >

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