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SIngleHander Schooner boom and gaff questions

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  • Chris Kottaridis
    I am starting work on the single Handed schooner. Due to current space restrictions I am starting with the booms and gaffs. I ve got some uninformed questions
    Message 1 of 4 , May 3, 2006
      I am starting work on the single Handed schooner. Due to current space
      restrictions I am starting with the booms and gaffs. I've got some
      uninformed questions that if anyone can answer I'd appreciate it:

      1. I am not entirely sure how the sails attach onto the booms and gaffs.

      There's an inset on the sail plan page that shows "end of Booms". It
      shows a notch in the end vertically and a dowel rod through the boom
      horizontally. There is also an inset that shows "Boom & Gaff Jaws" that
      looks like there is a hole horizontally through the front end of the
      booms and gaffs.From the sail plan picture it doesn't look like there is
      any loops around the boom or gaff for the sail like there are for the
      mast.

      According to item #2 the topping lift passes through the notch to the
      mast, I assume being tied to the dowel rod. I assume the sail does not
      tie off through the notch.

      So, is the tack of the sail laced through the hole in the front of
      the boom and then the clew tied around the dowel rod somehow, leaving
      everything in between loose fitted?

      I assume the the throat of the sail ties to the hole under the jaws
      of the gaff. But, I don't see anything in the diagram about how the head
      of the sail can attach to the end of the gaff ? Should there be a hole
      or a dowel rod there ?

      2. Any advantage for the jaw that sits on top of the booms and gaffs to
      be solid wood over plywood ? I think I have some mahogany that is large
      enough, otherwise it'll be BS6566 mahogany plywood.

      3. The lines drawn representing the peak and throat halyards just go out
      to the gaff and touch it and stop. Are there supposed to be holes in
      specific locations for the peak and throat halyards to tie through or do
      you just tie a good knot around the gaff where it seems appropriate?
      I guess by tying them you could slightly change their positions if need
      be.

      Thanks

      Chris Kottaridis (chriskot@...)
    • John and Kathy Trussell
      Chris, All I know about the His and Her Schooner is the study plan in Boats With an Open Mind, but I did buid a Scooner several years ago. On Scooner (aka
      Message 2 of 4 , May 3, 2006
        Chris,
        All I know about the His and Her Schooner is the study plan in Boats With an Open Mind, but I did buid a Scooner several years ago.

        On Scooner (aka Light Scooner), There were jaws on both the boom and the gaff. These were held to the mast with a piece of line which was passed through one "ear" of thejaw, around the mast, and through the other ear--with a stopper knot at each end. I found some wooden beads at a craft store which served as parrels.

        There are several ways to lash a sail to a boom or gaff. The critical part is to get the corners of the sail where you want them. On a boat like this, this is usually done by drilling a hole in each end of the boom and tieing a line through a grommet at the appropriate cornertake turns through the holes in the boom grommet and tension the sail where you think you might like it. Then take a couple of turns tthrough the grommet and around the spar. This will stabilize the corners. Then you can tie the rest of the sail down with individual ties, a spiral line, or a series of half hitches. I use individual ties as this gives me scope to fiddle with the draft.

        In regards to the jaws. these take a lot of strain in a jibe or if the gaff hans up when lowering the sail. Plywood jaws are less likely to split than natural wood (though you can run a couple of rivets through the jaw). Conventional wisdom is to screw the jaws to the spars to facilitate replacement if you bust one (thogh I never did have this problem)

        With these very small sails, there is no need for a bunch of blocks. Halyards can be tied to the gaff. On some of his plans, PCB shows a homemade, wooden stop glued to the gaffs. (Drill the biggest hole you can in a block of wood, split the wood, round off the outside corners, and glue the stop to the gaff.)

        Building any schooner is an exercise in spar making.While you are going through the process, you might as well make the tiller too. If you hit your local hardware store, you may find an ax handle which is the appropriate sizr and made of ash. Ash mkes a good tiller and someone else has done the work of carving and sanding it for you:>)

        Have fun.

        John T

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Chris Kottaridis
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, May 03, 2006 9:57 PM
        Subject: [bolger] SIngleHander Schooner boom and gaff questions


        I am starting work on the single Handed schooner. Due to current space
        restrictions I am starting with the booms and gaffs. I've got some
        uninformed questions that if anyone can answer I'd appreciate it:

        1. I am not entirely sure how the sails attach onto the booms and gaffs.

        There's an inset on the sail plan page that shows "end of Booms". It
        shows a notch in the end vertically and a dowel rod through the boom
        horizontally. There is also an inset that shows "Boom & Gaff Jaws" that
        looks like there is a hole horizontally through the front end of the
        booms and gaffs.From the sail plan picture it doesn't look like there is
        any loops around the boom or gaff for the sail like there are for the
        mast.

        According to item #2 the topping lift passes through the notch to the
        mast, I assume being tied to the dowel rod. I assume the sail does not
        tie off through the notch.

        So, is the tack of the sail laced through the hole in the front of
        the boom and then the clew tied around the dowel rod somehow, leaving
        everything in between loose fitted?

        I assume the the throat of the sail ties to the hole under the jaws
        of the gaff. But, I don't see anything in the diagram about how the head
        of the sail can attach to the end of the gaff ? Should there be a hole
        or a dowel rod there ?

        2. Any advantage for the jaw that sits on top of the booms and gaffs to
        be solid wood over plywood ? I think I have some mahogany that is large
        enough, otherwise it'll be BS6566 mahogany plywood.

        3. The lines drawn representing the peak and throat halyards just go out
        to the gaff and touch it and stop. Are there supposed to be holes in
        specific locations for the peak and throat halyards to tie through or do
        you just tie a good knot around the gaff where it seems appropriate?
        I guess by tying them you could slightly change their positions if need
        be.

        Thanks

        Chris Kottaridis (chriskot@...)


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      • Susan Davis
        ... You cleat the outhaul and topping lift to this. ... That s what I did. It s helpful to be able to adjust the foot tension, and cleating it to the topping
        Message 3 of 4 , May 3, 2006
          > There's an inset on the sail plan page that shows "end of Booms".
          > It shows a notch in the end vertically and a dowel rod through the
          > boom horizontally.

          You cleat the outhaul and topping lift to this.

          > According to item #2 the topping lift passes through the notch to
          > the mast, I assume being tied to the dowel rod. I assume the sail
          > does not tie off through the notch.

          That's what I did. It's helpful to be able to adjust the foot
          tension, and cleating it to the topping lift cleat gives you the
          ability to do that.

          > So, is the tack of the sail laced through the hole in the front of
          > the boom and then the clew tied around the dowel rod somehow,
          > leaving everything in between loose fitted?

          No. You do as you describe, and additionally bend the foot of the
          sail onto the boom by tying loops of line (which go through grommets
          in the foot) around the boom.

          > I assume the the throat of the sail ties to the hole under the jaws
          > of the gaff.

          Yes.

          > But, I don't see anything in the diagram about how the head
          > of the sail can attach to the end of the gaff? Should there be a
          > hole or a dowel rod there ?

          A hole.

          > 2. Any advantage for the jaw that sits on top of the booms and
          > gaffs to be solid wood over plywood?

          No. Mine are plywood.

          > 3. The lines drawn representing the peak and throat halyards just
          > go out to the gaff and touch it and stop. Are there supposed to be
          > holes in specific locations for the peak and throat halyards to tie
          > through

          Yes. In fact, I think the instructions mention this, and give a
          proposed distance from the end of the spar. If not, you can take the
          measurement off the plan.

          > I guess by tying them you could slightly change their positions if
          > need be.

          Just tying them won't work -- the halyard will slip on the spar. You
          need to drill a hole.

          --
          Susan Davis <futabachan@...>
        • Chris Kottaridis
          ... OK, so both outhaul for the sail and the topping lift go through the notch and then tie off on one side of the dowel rod or the other. Got it! ... Got it
          Message 4 of 4 , May 4, 2006
            On Thu, 2006-05-04 at 05:30 +0000, Susan Davis wrote:
            > > There's an inset on the sail plan page that shows "end of Booms".
            > > It shows a notch in the end vertically and a dowel rod through the
            > > boom horizontally.
            >
            > You cleat the outhaul and topping lift to this.

            OK, so both outhaul for the sail and the topping lift go through the
            notch and then tie off on one side of the dowel rod or the other. Got
            it!

            >
            > > According to item #2 the topping lift passes through the notch to
            > > the mast, I assume being tied to the dowel rod. I assume the sail
            > > does not tie off through the notch.
            >
            > That's what I did. It's helpful to be able to adjust the foot
            > tension, and cleating it to the topping lift cleat gives you the
            > ability to do that.

            Got it thanks.

            >
            > > So, is the tack of the sail laced through the hole in the front of
            > > the boom and then the clew tied around the dowel rod somehow,
            > > leaving everything in between loose fitted?
            >
            > No. You do as you describe, and additionally bend the foot of the
            > sail onto the boom by tying loops of line (which go through grommets
            > in the foot) around the boom.

            The sail plan didn't show any grommet holes along the foot of the sail
            or the head. Would you say three along the bottom of the foresail and 4
            along the bottom of the main sail be adequate ? I assume three or so
            along the head tied to the gaffs would be reasonable as well.

            >
            > > I assume the the throat of the sail ties to the hole under the jaws
            > > of the gaff.
            >
            > Yes.
            >
            > > But, I don't see anything in the diagram about how the head
            > > of the sail can attach to the end of the gaff? Should there be a
            > > hole or a dowel rod there ?
            >
            > A hole.

            Ok

            >
            > > 2. Any advantage for the jaw that sits on top of the booms and
            > > gaffs to be solid wood over plywood?
            >
            > No. Mine are plywood.

            Ok

            >
            > > 3. The lines drawn representing the peak and throat halyards just
            > > go out to the gaff and touch it and stop. Are there supposed to be
            > > holes in specific locations for the peak and throat halyards to tie
            > > through
            >
            > Yes. In fact, I think the instructions mention this, and give a
            > proposed distance from the end of the spar. If not, you can take the
            > measurement off the plan.

            Yep, you are right, I missed it in items #3 & #4:

            3. Main peak halyard 1/4" by 26': standing end around gaff around gaff
            18" below peak.

            4. Main throat halyard 1/4" by 26': standing end around gaff above jaws.

            but it sound like your experience implies holes are best. Thanks.

            >
            > > I guess by tying them you could slightly change their positions if
            > > need be.
            >
            > Just tying them won't work -- the halyard will slip on the spar. You
            > need to drill a hole.

            Got it.

            Thanks

            Chris Kottaridis (chriskot@...)
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