Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Sika epoxy Question Sikadur 52 or Sikadur 61

Expand Messages
  • electricdrjoe
    Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat building adventure to Chile. I plan to fly in, build a boat with local materials, float a river and fly home in 3
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 16, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat building adventure to Chile.
      I plan to fly in, build a boat with local materials, float a river and
      fly home in 3 weeks. I have questions about epoxy from Sika. I found a
      translated page
      http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf.\
      cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D24\
      876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%2\
      6rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en
      <http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf\
      .cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D2\
      4876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%\
      26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en> that mentions Sikadur 52 as a
      windsurf/boat building epoxy. My spanish is poor and I am sure the
      automatic translation is not good.

      I did find the Swiss company Sika in Chile
      http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut
      <http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut> they
      have not responded to my email. I can understand their reluctance to
      encourage such a crazy idea as they may worry about liability in using
      concrete patching epoxy in a stitch and glue boat.

      Has anyone used these products for boat building? Are there other
      epoxies in Chile I should consider?



      Thank you for any advice.



      Sincerly,



      Joe Neill





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ANDREW AIREY
      Hi all Am using this as a follow up to my earlier query about epoxies because it may have some relevance. 1.What precisely is special about marine epoxies. The
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 17, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi all

        Am using this as a follow up to my earlier query about
        epoxies because it may have some relevance.
        1.What precisely is special about marine epoxies.
        The reason I ask is that my fibreglass cloth supplier
        can do what he describes as a 'General Purpose Epoxy'
        at about half the price of the marine epoxies although
        he is aware of the SP systems products(I'm in the UK).
        The point is,for brief or interior use,does it matter,
        since the epoxy is not going to be exposed to the
        water at all,or as in the original query,only briefly.
        In any case,if the boat is to be painted,ideally with
        a marine paint,would this not protect the epoxy.A more
        serious point for those of us rebuilding a boat and
        expecting to use it for a while,is the effect of a
        hard epoxy coating on the wood.A book I have on
        restoring powerboats alleges that hard epoxies will
        separate from the wood,taking some of the wood with
        it,and allowing rot to continue apace underneath, and
        what you want is a 'penetrating' epoxy like Smith's
        Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer which has a more
        flexible effect.It's been getting me thoroughly
        confused
        Cheers
        Andy Airey
        --- electricdrjoe <electrichospital@...>
        wrote:


        ---------------------------------

        Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat building
        adventure to Chile.
        I plan to fly in, build a boat with local materials,
        float a river and
        fly home in 3 weeks. I have questions about epoxy
        from Sika. I found a
        translated page
        http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf.\
        cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D24\
        876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%2\
        6rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en
        <http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf\
        .cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D2\
        4876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%\
        26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en> that mentions
        Sikadur 52 as a
        windsurf/boat building epoxy. My spanish is poor and
        I am sure the
        automatic translation is not good.

        I did find the Swiss company Sika in Chile
        http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut
        <http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut>
        they
        have not responded to my email. I can understand
        their reluctance to
        encourage such a crazy idea as they may worry about
        liability in using
        concrete patching epoxy in a stitch and glue boat.

        Has anyone used these products for boat building? Are
        there other
        epoxies in Chile I should consider?



        Thank you for any advice.



        Sincerly,



        Joe Neill





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        Bolger rules!!!
        - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
        - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming,
        or flogging dead horses
        - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed,
        thanks, Fred' posts
        - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts,
        and snip away
        - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
        Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
        - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        - Open discussion:
        bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



        ---------------------------------
        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        Visit your group "bolger" on the web.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
        Terms of Service.


        ---------------------------------






        ___________________________________________________________
        Switch an email account to Yahoo! Mail, you could win FIFA World Cup tickets. http://uk.mail.yahoo.com
      • derbyrm
        I d suggest you visit the System Three web site and check out The Epoxy Book. http://www.systemthree.com/index_2.asp They require registration, but no
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 17, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          I'd suggest you visit the System Three web site and check out "The Epoxy
          Book." http://www.systemthree.com/index_2.asp They require registration,
          but no charge, and they discuss the chemistry of epoxies and what goes well
          where.

          As I, a non-chemist, understand it, the magic is in the hardener additives
          and what you're after is a match between the cured epoxy and the material
          being bonded. Mixing ratio and pot life and cure time and viscosity and
          degree of blush are other variables of interest, along with the ambient
          temperature where you'll be mixing the resin with the hardener. When the
          aircraft companies were learning to use the stuff it was common to see one
          or more tin cans sitting on the apron blazing away from the exothermic
          reaction contained in too large a mix quantity and a small surface area
          container. In the three or four ounce quantities I mix, I've had them get
          too hot to hold, but never smoke or melt the plastic pot.

          The 1:1 general purpose epoxies from the local hardware store harden to a
          glass-like clear substance which is great for repairing tea cups, but not at
          all good for wooden boat building. System Three (for their three different
          speed hardeners) and West System (because nobody can spell Gougeon) use 2:1
          and 5:1 ratios respectively and have been used for boat building for many
          years. They also offer specialty goops for surfboard makers and for coating
          or rot repair.

          The next consideration is the stuff you mix in after the resin and hardener
          are well stirred. Without a thixotropic agent, epoxy will ooze thru the
          smallest pinhole and end up on the floor. I like wood flour but Cab-O-Sil
          also works (brown vs. white). Other materials are also added to supply
          strength and/or to make the sanding/fairing easier (milled glass, chopped
          glass fibers and/or phenolic or quartz microspheres). Fiberglass cloth
          reinforces the epoxy so that the plywood checking doesn't rupture the
          waterproofing. Fiberglass tape reinforces joints.

          There is a learning curve, so if you have time I'd suggest building
          something with the chosen material before your expedition. Wear gloves and
          keep the goop off of your skin! Wear old, disposable clothes whenever you
          get within ten feet of your project.

          Roger
          derbyrm@...
          http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "ANDREW AIREY" <andyairey@...>
          To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 11:30 AM
          Subject: Re: [bolger] Sika epoxy Question Sikadur 52 or Sikadur 61


          > Hi all
          >
          > Am using this as a follow up to my earlier query about
          > epoxies because it may have some relevance.
          > 1.What precisely is special about marine epoxies.
          > The reason I ask is that my fibreglass cloth supplier
          > can do what he describes as a 'General Purpose Epoxy'
          > at about half the price of the marine epoxies although
          > he is aware of the SP systems products(I'm in the UK).
          > The point is,for brief or interior use,does it matter,
          > since the epoxy is not going to be exposed to the
          > water at all,or as in the original query,only briefly.
          > In any case,if the boat is to be painted,ideally with
          > a marine paint,would this not protect the epoxy.A more
          > serious point for those of us rebuilding a boat and
          > expecting to use it for a while,is the effect of a
          > hard epoxy coating on the wood.A book I have on
          > restoring powerboats alleges that hard epoxies will
          > separate from the wood,taking some of the wood with
          > it,and allowing rot to continue apace underneath, and
          > what you want is a 'penetrating' epoxy like Smith's
          > Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer which has a more
          > flexible effect.It's been getting me thoroughly
          > confused
          > Cheers
          > Andy Airey
          > --- electricdrjoe <electrichospital@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          >
          > Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat building
          > adventure to Chile.
          > I plan to fly in, build a boat with local materials,
          > float a river and
          > fly home in 3 weeks. I have questions about epoxy
          > from Sika. I found a
          > translated page
          > http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf.\
          > cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D24\
          > 876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%2\
          > 6rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en
          > <http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf\
          > .cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D2\
          > 4876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%\
          > 26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en> that mentions
          > Sikadur 52 as a
          > windsurf/boat building epoxy. My spanish is poor and
          > I am sure the
          > automatic translation is not good.
          >
          > I did find the Swiss company Sika in Chile
          > http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut
          > <http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut>
          > they
          > have not responded to my email. I can understand
          > their reluctance to
          > encourage such a crazy idea as they may worry about
          > liability in using
          > concrete patching epoxy in a stitch and glue boat.
          >
          > Has anyone used these products for boat building? Are
          > there other
          > epoxies in Chile I should consider?
          >
          >
          >
          > Thank you for any advice.
          >
          >
          >
          > Sincerly,
          >
          >
          >
          > Joe Neill
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > Bolger rules!!!
          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming,
          > or flogging dead horses
          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed,
          > thanks, Fred' posts
          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts,
          > and snip away
          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
          > Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
          > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > - Open discussion:
          > bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          >
          > Visit your group "bolger" on the web.
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          > Terms of Service.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ___________________________________________________________
          > Switch an email account to Yahoo! Mail, you could win FIFA World Cup
          > tickets. http://uk.mail.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          > Bolger rules!!!
          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead
          > horses
          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
          > (978) 282-1349
          > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Eric OHiggins
          All excellent advice. There s a lot to know and to get comfortable with. System Three has a kit for I think $30 US that should give you enough stuff to try
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 17, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            All excellent advice. There's a lot to know and to
            get comfortable with. System Three has a kit for I
            think $30 US that should give you enough stuff to try
            it out on yr various materials and find out what
            happens. Try yr marine paint on cured epoxy as well
            to find out if it will stick.
            Eric

            --- derbyrm <derbyrm@...> wrote:

            > I'd suggest you visit the System Three web site and
            > check out "The Epoxy
            > Book." http://www.systemthree.com/index_2.asp They
            > require registration,
            > but no charge, and they discuss the chemistry of
            > epoxies and what goes well
            > where.
            >
            > As I, a non-chemist, understand it, the magic is in
            > the hardener additives
            > and what you're after is a match between the cured
            > epoxy and the material
            > being bonded. Mixing ratio and pot life and cure
            > time and viscosity and
            > degree of blush are other variables of interest,
            > along with the ambient
            > temperature where you'll be mixing the resin with
            > the hardener. When the
            > aircraft companies were learning to use the stuff it
            > was common to see one
            > or more tin cans sitting on the apron blazing away
            > from the exothermic
            > reaction contained in too large a mix quantity and a
            > small surface area
            > container. In the three or four ounce quantities I
            > mix, I've had them get
            > too hot to hold, but never smoke or melt the plastic
            > pot.
            >
            > The 1:1 general purpose epoxies from the local
            > hardware store harden to a
            > glass-like clear substance which is great for
            > repairing tea cups, but not at
            > all good for wooden boat building. System Three
            > (for their three different
            > speed hardeners) and West System (because nobody can
            > spell Gougeon) use 2:1
            > and 5:1 ratios respectively and have been used for
            > boat building for many
            > years. They also offer specialty goops for
            > surfboard makers and for coating
            > or rot repair.
            >
            > The next consideration is the stuff you mix in after
            > the resin and hardener
            > are well stirred. Without a thixotropic agent,
            > epoxy will ooze thru the
            > smallest pinhole and end up on the floor. I like
            > wood flour but Cab-O-Sil
            > also works (brown vs. white). Other materials are
            > also added to supply
            > strength and/or to make the sanding/fairing easier
            > (milled glass, chopped
            > glass fibers and/or phenolic or quartz
            > microspheres). Fiberglass cloth
            > reinforces the epoxy so that the plywood checking
            > doesn't rupture the
            > waterproofing. Fiberglass tape reinforces joints.
            >
            > There is a learning curve, so if you have time I'd
            > suggest building
            > something with the chosen material before your
            > expedition. Wear gloves and
            > keep the goop off of your skin! Wear old,
            > disposable clothes whenever you
            > get within ten feet of your project.
            >
            > Roger
            > derbyrm@...
            > http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "ANDREW AIREY" <andyairey@...>
            > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 11:30 AM
            > Subject: Re: [bolger] Sika epoxy Question Sikadur 52
            > or Sikadur 61
            >
            >
            > > Hi all
            > >
            > > Am using this as a follow up to my earlier query
            > about
            > > epoxies because it may have some relevance.
            > > 1.What precisely is special about marine epoxies.
            > > The reason I ask is that my fibreglass cloth
            > supplier
            > > can do what he describes as a 'General Purpose
            > Epoxy'
            > > at about half the price of the marine epoxies
            > although
            > > he is aware of the SP systems products(I'm in the
            > UK).
            > > The point is,for brief or interior use,does it
            > matter,
            > > since the epoxy is not going to be exposed to the
            > > water at all,or as in the original query,only
            > briefly.
            > > In any case,if the boat is to be painted,ideally
            > with
            > > a marine paint,would this not protect the epoxy.A
            > more
            > > serious point for those of us rebuilding a boat
            > and
            > > expecting to use it for a while,is the effect of a
            > > hard epoxy coating on the wood.A book I have on
            > > restoring powerboats alleges that hard epoxies
            > will
            > > separate from the wood,taking some of the wood
            > with
            > > it,and allowing rot to continue apace underneath,
            > and
            > > what you want is a 'penetrating' epoxy like
            > Smith's
            > > Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer which has a more
            > > flexible effect.It's been getting me thoroughly
            > > confused
            > > Cheers
            > > Andy Airey
            > > --- electricdrjoe <electrichospital@...>
            > > wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > ---------------------------------
            > >
            > > Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat
            > building
            > > adventure to Chile.
            > > I plan to fly in, build a boat with local
            > materials,
            > > float a river and
            > > fly home in 3 weeks. I have questions about epoxy
            > > from Sika. I found a
            > > translated page
            > >
            >
            http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf.\
            > >
            >
            cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D24\
            > >
            >
            876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%2\
            > > 6rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en
            > >
            >
            <http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf\
            > >
            >
            .cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%26i%3D2\
            > >
            >
            4876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%\
            > > 26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en> that mentions
            > > Sikadur 52 as a
            > > windsurf/boat building epoxy. My spanish is poor
            > and
            > > I am sure the
            > > automatic translation is not good.
            > >
            > > I did find the Swiss company Sika in Chile
            > >
            >
            http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut
            > >
            >
            <http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut>
            > > they
            > > have not responded to my email. I can understand
            > > their reluctance to
            > > encourage such a crazy idea as they may worry
            > about
            > > liability in using
            > > concrete patching epoxy in a stitch and glue boat.
            > >
            > > Has anyone used these products for boat building?
            > Are
            > > there other
            > > epoxies in Chile I should consider?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Thank you for any advice.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Sincerly,
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Joe Neill
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Bolger rules!!!
            > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
            > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming,
            > respamming,
            > > or flogging dead horses
            > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no
            > 'Ed,
            > > thanks, Fred' posts
            >
            === message truncated ===


            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • russingram
            I don t think you need epoxy for a boat you will ony use for three weeks. ... Epoxy ... registration, ... goes well ... additives ... material ... viscosity
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 17, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              I don't think you need epoxy for a boat you will ony use for three
              weeks.

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "derbyrm" <derbyrm@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'd suggest you visit the System Three web site and check out "The
              Epoxy
              > Book." http://www.systemthree.com/index_2.asp They require
              registration,
              > but no charge, and they discuss the chemistry of epoxies and what
              goes well
              > where.
              >
              > As I, a non-chemist, understand it, the magic is in the hardener
              additives
              > and what you're after is a match between the cured epoxy and the
              material
              > being bonded. Mixing ratio and pot life and cure time and
              viscosity and
              > degree of blush are other variables of interest, along with the
              ambient
              > temperature where you'll be mixing the resin with the hardener.
              When the
              > aircraft companies were learning to use the stuff it was common to
              see one
              > or more tin cans sitting on the apron blazing away from the
              exothermic
              > reaction contained in too large a mix quantity and a small surface
              area
              > container. In the three or four ounce quantities I mix, I've had
              them get
              > too hot to hold, but never smoke or melt the plastic pot.
              >
              > The 1:1 general purpose epoxies from the local hardware store
              harden to a
              > glass-like clear substance which is great for repairing tea cups,
              but not at
              > all good for wooden boat building. System Three (for their three
              different
              > speed hardeners) and West System (because nobody can spell
              Gougeon) use 2:1
              > and 5:1 ratios respectively and have been used for boat building
              for many
              > years. They also offer specialty goops for surfboard makers and
              for coating
              > or rot repair.
              >
              > The next consideration is the stuff you mix in after the resin and
              hardener
              > are well stirred. Without a thixotropic agent, epoxy will ooze
              thru the
              > smallest pinhole and end up on the floor. I like wood flour but
              Cab-O-Sil
              > also works (brown vs. white). Other materials are also added to
              supply
              > strength and/or to make the sanding/fairing easier (milled glass,
              chopped
              > glass fibers and/or phenolic or quartz microspheres). Fiberglass
              cloth
              > reinforces the epoxy so that the plywood checking doesn't rupture
              the
              > waterproofing. Fiberglass tape reinforces joints.
              >
              > There is a learning curve, so if you have time I'd suggest
              building
              > something with the chosen material before your expedition. Wear
              gloves and
              > keep the goop off of your skin! Wear old, disposable clothes
              whenever you
              > get within ten feet of your project.
              >
              > Roger
              > derbyrm@...
              > http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "ANDREW AIREY" <andyairey@...>
              > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Monday, April 17, 2006 11:30 AM
              > Subject: Re: [bolger] Sika epoxy Question Sikadur 52 or Sikadur 61
              >
              >
              > > Hi all
              > >
              > > Am using this as a follow up to my earlier query about
              > > epoxies because it may have some relevance.
              > > 1.What precisely is special about marine epoxies.
              > > The reason I ask is that my fibreglass cloth supplier
              > > can do what he describes as a 'General Purpose Epoxy'
              > > at about half the price of the marine epoxies although
              > > he is aware of the SP systems products(I'm in the UK).
              > > The point is,for brief or interior use,does it matter,
              > > since the epoxy is not going to be exposed to the
              > > water at all,or as in the original query,only briefly.
              > > In any case,if the boat is to be painted,ideally with
              > > a marine paint,would this not protect the epoxy.A more
              > > serious point for those of us rebuilding a boat and
              > > expecting to use it for a while,is the effect of a
              > > hard epoxy coating on the wood.A book I have on
              > > restoring powerboats alleges that hard epoxies will
              > > separate from the wood,taking some of the wood with
              > > it,and allowing rot to continue apace underneath, and
              > > what you want is a 'penetrating' epoxy like Smith's
              > > Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer which has a more
              > > flexible effect.It's been getting me thoroughly
              > > confused
              > > Cheers
              > > Andy Airey
              > > --- electricdrjoe <electrichospital@...>
              > > wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > >
              > > Dear fellow boaters: I am planning a boat building
              > > adventure to Chile.
              > > I plan to fly in, build a boat with local materials,
              > > float a river and
              > > fly home in 3 weeks. I have questions about epoxy
              > > from Sika. I found a
              > > translated page
              > > http://translate.google.com/translate?
              hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf.\
              > > cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%
              26i%3D24\
              > > 876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%
              26lr%3D%2\
              > > 6rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en
              > > <http://translate.google.com/translate?
              hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.windsurf\
              > > .cl/modules.php%3Fop%3Dmodload%26name%3Dph%26file%3Dread%26f%3D1%
              26i%3D2\
              > > 4876%26t%3D24818&prev=/search%3Fq%3DTerciado%2Bmarino%26hl%3Den%
              26lr%3D%\
              > > 26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2005-16,GGLD:en> that mentions
              > > Sikadur 52 as a
              > > windsurf/boat building epoxy. My spanish is poor and
              > > I am sure the
              > > automatic translation is not good.
              > >
              > > I did find the Swiss company Sika in Chile
              > > http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut
              > > <http://www.waterproofing-supplies.com.au/sika/sikadur52.htmlbut>
              > > they
              > > have not responded to my email. I can understand
              > > their reluctance to
              > > encourage such a crazy idea as they may worry about
              > > liability in using
              > > concrete patching epoxy in a stitch and glue boat.
              > >
              > > Has anyone used these products for boat building? Are
              > > there other
              > > epoxies in Chile I should consider?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Thank you for any advice.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Sincerly,
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Joe Neill
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Bolger rules!!!
              > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
              > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming,
              > > or flogging dead horses
              > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed,
              > > thanks, Fred' posts
              > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts,
              > > and snip away
              > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
              > > Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              > > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > - Open discussion:
              > > bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              > >
              > >
              > > Visit your group "bolger" on the web.
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
              > > Terms of Service.
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ___________________________________________________________
              > > Switch an email account to Yahoo! Mail, you could win FIFA World
              Cup
              > > tickets. http://uk.mail.yahoo.com
              > >
              > >
              > > Bolger rules!!!
              > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
              > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or
              flogging dead
              > > horses
              > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks,
              Fred' posts
              > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip
              away
              > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
              01930, Fax:
              > > (978) 282-1349
              > > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.