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Re: Birdwatcher II

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  • Peter Lenihan
    ... certain ... the ... David, Excellent good news!!! By all means take the time(and materials) needed to do a first class rendition....it will be a thing of
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 2 12:44 PM
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dnjost" <davidjost@...> wrote:
      >
      > So, the plans for Birdwatcher II have arrived...
      >
      > Next, the master planning. Nervous anticipation has arisen as my
      > proximity to Mr. Bolger's residence means that there will be a
      certain
      > level of boatbuilder accountibility here. A hack job is out of
      the
      > question.


      David,

      Excellent good news!!! By all means take the time(and materials)
      needed to do a first class rendition....it will be a thing of beauty
      worth passing on to the kids which you'll never
      regret!.Besides,you've had some good practice with a few other
      Bolger boats and have thus built yourself out of any further excuses
      for "hack jobs":-)

      All the best to ya!!

      Sincerely,

      Peter Lenihan,feeling some early signs of Spring already creeping in
      along the shores of the St.Lawrence...........
    • dnjost
      Ok - It does include a commentary that outlines the thought process behind the design and what it hopes to accomplish. a well detailed building key. and 5
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 3 6:08 AM
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        Ok -

        It does include a commentary that outlines the thought process behind
        the design and what it hopes to accomplish. a well detailed building
        key. and 5 sheets of blueprints in both metric and
        Dodecametric/fractional system (feet/inches/eighths) ;-)

        The building method as far as I have figured out is simplistic beyond
        belief. Lay out the ply sheets, attach to frames and stem, square up
        and put the bottom on. The rest is in the details: Mast (haven't
        quite figured that one out yet), Centreboard 109 lbs steel ballast
        insert, rudder, sails, etc, lexan windows.

        Pretty cool, and well worth the cost of the plans just for the puzzle
        solving aspect of the project.

        My plan is to attack it little by little, and then build the same
        way.

        1st step = materials list

        David Jost
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... A quickie model, made from cardboard, might also be a good first step.
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 3 6:18 AM
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          > 1st step = materials list
          >
          > David Jost

          A quickie model, made from cardboard, might also be a good first step.
        • John Bell
          ... From: dnjost ... If it s the same mast as as shown on the original BW, the it s a puzzler. Cutting the long vee s in the center
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 3 7:00 AM
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "dnjost" <davidjost@...>

            > The rest is in the details: Mast (haven't
            > quite figured that one out yet),

            If it's the same mast as as shown on the original BW, the it's a puzzler.
            Cutting the long vee's in the center plug is doable, but how are you
            supposed to insure those skinny points are glued on the inside of the main
            box section?

            I'd build either a standard box section or a birdsmouth and be done with it.
          • dnjost
            John - That about sums it up...the puzzler. It appears to be series of concentric box spars that are glued one inside the other and then faired smooth. Will
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 3 8:04 AM
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              John -

              That about sums it up...the puzzler. It appears to be series of
              concentric box spars that are glued one inside the other and then
              faired smooth. Will investigate a little bit on this as I really want
              to build to plans and not deviate unless absolutely essential.

              I suppose this would allow the use of shorter pieces of good stock and
              avoid the hassle of trying to scarf and find straight pieces w/o
              blemishes, and result it scarfed sections through the fairing process.
              It actually seems reasonable. No need for the expense of sitka spruce!

              Bruce's idea of doing a model first is quite rational.

              Thanks to all for the support and ideas.

              David Jost
            • saillips
              ... Hi David, When I receieved my BW2 plans,I found it very helpful to go through the key and refer to the plans sheets at the same time, several times over
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 4 10:54 AM
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                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dnjost" <davidjost@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ok -
                >
                > It does include a commentary that outlines the thought process behind
                > the design and what it hopes to accomplish. a well detailed building
                > key. and 5 sheets of blueprints in both metric and
                > Dodecametric/fractional system (feet/inches/eighths) ;-)

                Hi David,
                When I receieved my BW2 plans,I found it very helpful to go through
                the key and refer to the plans sheets at the same time, several times
                over before doing anything. Since there is no "building sequence" per
                se, I thought I'd offer my 2 cents on what worked and what I'd do
                differently "next time".
                I laid out my side panels with butt blocks and installed all interior
                framing while flat on the floor. I then flipped the panels and
                preglassed using Garth Batista's technique(see Jim Michalak's web
                page, back issues) of rolling a plasitc film on top of the wet
                epoxy/glass.He used Mylar and got an almost mirror finish. I used
                sheet plastic and got a very smooth surface that reduced my fairing to
                almost nothing. If you're using top quality materials, like Bob Larkin
                is, you may want to skip the exterior glass on the topsides.I used ACX
                ply. These things worked well.
                I also pre-cut the motor cut-out on the starboard side while the
                panels were flat.Seemed like a good idea at the time. This resulted in
                an unfair bend in that area when the sides were sprung around the
                frames. It took some wrestling to correct, and I'd wait until the hull
                is together and perhaps the deck is on before cutting it out "next time".
                After the sides were on the frames I laminated the sheer clamps and
                chine logs. I cut my chine logs flush with the inner stem and stern
                posts, before I added the exterior stem and stern caps. Because of
                aesthetics and perhaps strength, I'd let the chine logs flow into the
                exterior pieces "next time", like Bob Larkin did.
                The plans are vague about the sheer clamp/window transition to the aft
                deck, but Bob seems to have figured it out quite nicely. I'm not that
                far yet.
                Finally, if I were to do it again I would take Bruce's advice and
                build a model first.........like Bob did!
                Bottom line, build like Bob Larkin. He's thoughtful and meticulous in
                building, and generous and kind with advice.
                My pics are in bolger4photos.
                Best wishes in your building adventure,
                David Lipsey
              • dnjost
                David - thanks for the advice, and encouragement. I finally had a couple of hours to sit with the plans, scale rule, and building key and had some fun just
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 4 7:16 PM
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                  David -

                  thanks for the advice, and encouragement.

                  I finally had a couple of hours to sit with the plans, scale rule,
                  and building key and had some fun just figuring out how it all goes
                  together.

                  Having built Micro, the sequence appears to be similar without the
                  bother of the lead keel assembly. I am sure putting the 109lb board
                  in place will be no easy task, but I plan to employ slave labor here
                  (14 year old son).

                  The mast does appear to be as Bruce described as having the tapered
                  plug on the top 6' of mast. This appears to be the most challenging
                  carpentry. I may do up a birdsmouth or go with the standard box spar
                  as described in Chapelle's book. I am tempted to rabbet out some
                  2x4's glue them up, taper, and plug em' but I can see where the
                  orientation of the wood in the 4 sided box will add strength while
                  reducing weight aloft.

                  The good news is that it really is built in a sort of instant boat
                  fashion. (and my basement is exactly 25' long with huge removeable
                  bay windows!

                  DAvid Jost
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