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Re: [bolger] Re: Topaz--shape

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  • Sam Glasscock
    Rhett, I am glad you are enjoying her--you have made my day reading about your adventures. Here is one anchoring tip, which you may have figured out already.
    Message 1 of 52 , Feb 28, 2006
      Rhett, I am glad you are enjoying her--you have made
      my day reading about your adventures. Here is one
      anchoring tip, which you may have figured out already.
      With her very shallow underbody, if you anchor and
      leave the lower unit in the water, she will pivot
      around the motor, "sailing" off to one side or another
      and fetching up on the anchor rode with a jerk which
      will keep you awake, if there is any wind, and will
      also tend to break the anchor loose. If you tilt the
      motor up, she is nice and docile at anchor. I've got
      to tell you, I never was lucky enough to eat fresh
      redfish on her, though. Sam

      --- ravenouspi <ravenous@...> wrote:

      > Okay, after pestering Sam about posting photos on
      > the group for months
      > when I was thinking about building a Topaz--and even
      > going to see his
      > Topaz in Delaware. I ultimately bought his fine
      > craft.
      > So now I can climb aboard and look at her anytime I
      > want from any angle.
      > Dianne and I have used her twice. Unfortunatly we
      > didn't take many
      > pictures. I have posted 3 or 4 in Bolger 5 Photos
      > section in a folder
      > named TOPAZ.
      > Our first trip, we launched on a Friday evening, in
      > 30 mph winds with
      > lows in the 30s, just before dark. The wind pushed
      > us around
      > mercilessly as I was timid with the motor at first.
      > We were blown
      > into one side of the channel or the other as I tried
      > to get pointed
      > upriver into the wind while just above idle.
      > Finally I wised up and
      > gave her some gas. Then we were fine. The wind was
      > whipping and the
      > waves were capping even in the small river, and the
      > boat just cut
      > through without trouble. The wind was a little
      > troublesome but as
      > long as I stayed above 4 knots I could compensate.
      > We had more
      > trouble anchoring, in which we are also
      > inexperienced. In the AF4 we
      > typically beach or run up in some slew. I picked a
      > spot downwind of a
      > small islet hoping to get some protection from the
      > wind. But we had
      > only the 20 lb mushroom anchor from the AF4 and I
      > dropped it further
      > out in the channel than usual thinking to avoid
      > sitting on mud part of
      > the night at low tide. The wind forced us against
      > the far side of the
      > channel in no time, dragging anchor, into some dead
      > trees. We had a
      > dickens of a time getting out, fighting against the
      > wind and trying to
      > get anything other than sideways to the bank. After
      > a tense 30 minutes
      > of inching this way and that and listening to
      > branches scrape the
      > boat, we did manage to get off and back across the
      > channel to the
      > protected side. This time anchored right up on the
      > islet completely
      > out of the wind and had no more troubles. Dianne was
      > a little
      > stressed, but eventually we unwound. We turned on
      > the dickenson
      > propane heater, dried off, and settled into our new
      > digs. The heater
      > did a fine job, despite their being a definite draft
      > around the
      > windows. We were happy and toasty. Dianne studied
      > while I read a
      > good mystery novel, and we munched on mixed nuts. We
      > eventually put
      > the center piece between the two bunks in
      > place--turning the center of
      > the boat into one big bed, and slept well. The next
      > morning we went
      > back to dock where we picked up 8 additional
      > passengers, Dianne's sons
      > and their kids, and went down river to see what we
      > could see. One of
      > the islands (named Rhett's Island oddly enough) had
      > a raging marsh
      > fire. We investigated thinking we might see some
      > fleeing wildlife.
      > It was a fairly impressive sight. We then thought
      > to have lunch at a
      > local restaurant at a nearby marina, but I lost my
      > way and we wound up
      > using most of our ships stores on a single meal for
      > 10. And the kids
      > became enamoured of the porta-pottie, each of them
      > going at least
      > twice on the 4 hour trip. One of them took up
      > residence, preferring
      > the peace of sitting alone on the throne away from
      > the madding crowd.
      > Dianne is a sucker for the grandkids, so when we
      > dropped the guests
      > off for the night, she schemed on keeping three of
      > girls with us
      > overnight. We returned to our previous anchorage
      > and spent the night
      > with the girls. Most of the evening they played
      > cards and accused
      > each other of cheating fairly oblivious to their
      > surroundings. But in
      > the morning when the world lit up again, they had a
      > blast sitting out
      > on the front deck as we idled along the
      > river-pointing out logs that
      > looked like "Aligators" and shelling and eating
      > sunflower seeds. We
      > found the restaurant at the marina for lunch and
      > dropped the kids off
      > with their mothers. We took my parents for a short
      > ride, just to show
      > off our new toy. Then we took her out and rode
      > home.
      > Our second trip was longer and more peaceful. We
      > put in for four
      > days, spending most of it fishing, eating, and
      > sleeping on the
      > backside of Blackbeard Island. We were fishing for
      > Sheephead using
      > fiddlers for bait, but we wound up catching two
      > really nice redfish.
      > About two pounds each. I cooked really fancy meals
      > on the campstove,
      > and Dianne studied as usual. We saw porpoises and
      > pelicans and otters
      > and walked the beach in the wind, until our ears got
      > extremely cold.
      > It was Monday afternoon before we knew it and we
      > didn't want to come
      > back.
      > One day soon we will leave the boat out long enough
      > to paint and
      > decorate and make it our own, but not this weekend!
      > We are going out
      > again, just for two days, but the weather is
      > supposed to be clear and
      > warm. Sam is right, Coastal Georgia is a Topaz
      > paradise. We'll take
      > more and better pictures this time, we promise.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Sam Glasscock
      > <glasscocklanding@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > In fact,I'll
      > > > betcha there are
      > > > alot of folks who would love to see many many
      > more
      > > > pictures of
      > > > her,inside and out,placed in one of the "files"
      > > > sections(not photo
      > > > since the pics are too small ) of one of the
      > Bolger
      > > > groups.
      > >
      > > That would be up to Rhett, of this group, who is
      > now
      > > her owner, down in the Georgia low country. What
      > a
      > > paradise for shallow draft boats. I just got a
      > > digital camera before I delivered her--if I had
      > had
      > > one a few years ago you would have been sick of
      > > pictures of Spat by now. By the time Rhett got
      > her,
      > > she was pretty tired looking--I 'spect he will
      > renew
      > > the upholstry and paint, and get her sharp again.
      > > I'll stick the digital pictures I have in a file
      > > section, however. Sam
      > >
      > > __________________________________________________
      > > Do You Yahoo!?
      > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
      > protection around
      > > http://mail.yahoo.com
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


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    • Bruce Hallman
      Can you tell me about the topaz? Topaz is a design sold by Phil Bolger, essentially a shallow draft double ended outboard runabout, mostly out of plywood. I
      Message 52 of 52 , Oct 26, 2006
        Can you tell me about the topaz?

        Topaz is a design sold by Phil Bolger, essentially a shallow draft
        double ended outboard runabout, mostly out of plywood.

        I think that three have been built in the 'enclosed cabin' version,
        and I am the first to build in the 'open runabout' version. I think
        it could be built with MDO plywood, (without fiberglass), making it
        somewhat 'disposable', but with a boat this big (31ft) there is some
        justification towards spending the $/time to build it more
        substantially w/plywood/epoxy/fiberglass composite.

        Some photos of a Topaz build here:

        http://journeyboats.com/photo_journal.htm

        I used a different quicker technique for the bottom build, with no
        'table', Silicon Bronze nails instead of screws, and I was happy with
        the time saved.

        Presently, I am partially done, doing interior fitout (most recently,
        the 'faux-teak' floorboard planking between the seats and in the
        cockpit) plus painting of the underseat compartments. Two weeks ago,
        I installed the narrow curved midship top deck strake (20ft x 6"
        tilted and curved), for which I used Free!ship to calculate the
        layout. Handy software!
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