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Re: Long Micro materials and costs

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  • Bill Paxton
    ... You can ususally find all the lead you want for free by visiting a tire store. Ask for the discarded lead weights they removed from rims during the tire
    Message 1 of 48 , Feb 2, 2006
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      > Where did you find the lead.

      You can ususally find all the lead you want for free by visiting a
      tire store. Ask for the discarded lead weights they removed from rims
      during the tire changing process. They'll let you have them for free
      since they must pay to have them removed as hazardous waste.
    • dir_cobb
      Toad I have not built a LM. My Oldshoe was my first project and I built it with nothing but the plans and the instructions which came with them. I built over 7
      Message 48 of 48 , Dec 30, 2010
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        Toad

        I have not built a LM. My Oldshoe was my first project and I built it with nothing but the plans and the instructions which came with them. I built over 7 months and had little help.

        I have since bought many books, various sets of plans, built a couple of smaller boats and even a wooden model of the light schooner.

        I would agree with anyone who suggests building models of big boats before going full scale to make sure one fully understands what is going to happen (and what it will really look like).

        I believe I would have made a few less mistakes with Oldshoe if I had read everything I have since before building. However, I'm not sure I would ever have got round to building her at all.

        My personal concern with Micro and Long Micro was the lead slug for the keel. Oldshoe at 200lbs easier. I had someone else fill it for me, but it wasn't impossibly difficult.

        If you are a competent carpenter, I would not worry too much about starting with LM. If you are not, I would start with any one of the original type of instant boats as a primer. The bigger boats have stiffer materials but less pronounced curves.

        My feeling is that Payson is right when he says that mistakes which look terrible on the model don't show at all on the real thing. I have fiddled more with Nymph than I did with Oldshoe, although I spent more time on and got a lot more boat from Oldshoe.

        David
        Santiago, Chile
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