Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Windfola

Expand Messages
  • baysidewoodenboats
    ... Dear Charles, Windfola is Phil s design #311, and details appear beginning at page #129 of his book, The Folding Schooner and other adventures in boat
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 21, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "zavalacat" <zavala@s...> wrote:
      >
      > Does anyone know anything about the Windfola, I think 21 foot, canoe
      > yawl?
      > Charles Rouse
      >
      Dear Charles,

      Windfola is Phil's design #311, and details appear beginning at page
      #129 of his book, "The Folding Schooner and other adventures in boat
      design" Internation Marine Publishing Company 1976. By coincidence, I
      had been studying her last night (Australian Time0.

      She is indeed a 21' x 7' 1" double-ended canoe yawl, built lapstrake
      with a long, straight external keel of about 5" and a rope-hung
      leeboardfor use when serious about getting to windward. The rig is a
      balanced-lug main of 149sq.ft., and a sprit-boomed leg-o'-mutton
      mizzen of 42sq. ft.

      Windfola is open, with several large storage volumes under extensive
      decking. There are details on the plans for tented spay and camping
      shelter. Auxilliary power is from oars. If you are familiar with the
      canoe yawls popular in the late 1800's, you will know the sort of boat
      described.

      She is an absolutely beautiful design to my eyes - I just need to be
      able to convince myself that I can justify a 21ft LOA vessel these
      days. I've built so many boats now, that I take many second looks at
      boats with that much volume. I'm getting lazy...

      Ross Lillistone
    • pvanderwaart
      There was a Windfola built in New Zealand, I think. Perhaps that was the original built by the guy who commissioned the design. John Welsford, the designer
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 21, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        There was a Windfola built in New Zealand, I think. Perhaps that was
        the original built by the guy who commissioned the design. John
        Welsford, the designer from NZ, is familiar with the boat and the
        owner. I do remember him saying that it was very slow, but that would
        be compared to the more performance oriented boats that John designs.
        However, if you email John, or post a message on his Yahoo group
        (JWBuilders), you could get an informed opinion.

        Peter


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "baysidewoodenboats" <lillistone@b...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "zavalacat" <zavala@s...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Does anyone know anything about the Windfola, I think 21 foot, canoe
        > > yawl?
        > > Charles Rouse
        > >
        > Dear Charles,
        >
        > Windfola is Phil's design #311, and details appear beginning at page
        > #129 of his book, "The Folding Schooner and other adventures in boat
        > design" Internation Marine Publishing Company 1976. By coincidence, I
        > had been studying her last night (Australian Time0.
        >
        > She is indeed a 21' x 7' 1" double-ended canoe yawl, built lapstrake
        > with a long, straight external keel of about 5" and a rope-hung
        > leeboardfor use when serious about getting to windward. The rig is a
        > balanced-lug main of 149sq.ft., and a sprit-boomed leg-o'-mutton
        > mizzen of 42sq. ft.
        >
        > Windfola is open, with several large storage volumes under extensive
        > decking. There are details on the plans for tented spay and camping
        > shelter. Auxilliary power is from oars. If you are familiar with the
        > canoe yawls popular in the late 1800's, you will know the sort of boat
        > described.
        >
        > She is an absolutely beautiful design to my eyes - I just need to be
        > able to convince myself that I can justify a 21ft LOA vessel these
        > days. I've built so many boats now, that I take many second looks at
        > boats with that much volume. I'm getting lazy...
        >
        > Ross Lillistone
        >
      • zavalacat
        I did email John Wesford, he must have been working on his machine, he emailed back, Hi CHarles, yes I know the boat. Its fairly stable, very roomy, very
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 21, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          I did email John Wesford, he must have been working on his machine,
          he emailed back,

          "Hi CHarles, yes I know the boat. Its fairly stable, very roomy,
          very
          pretty, slow under sail and points poorly, was expensive to build and
          needs
          a lot of maintenance. Anything else?


          JohnW"

          There wasn't anything else on my part. I'm still thinking about the
          boat, theoretical anyway, since I'm already working on other projects.
          Perhaps the maintenance problem could be improved by building strip/
          sheathed or epoxied plywood clinker. The pointing is more problematic,
          perhaps inherent in the balanced lug, I wouldn't know. I wouldn't know
          either why it's slow, but if it is, it is. Charles Rouse

          "pvanderwaart" <pvanderwaart@y...> wrote:
          >
          > There was a Windfola built in New Zealand, I think. Perhaps that was
          > the original built by the guy who commissioned the design. John
          > Welsford, the designer from NZ, is familiar with the boat and the
          > owner. I do remember him saying that it was very slow, but that
          would
          > be compared to the more performance oriented boats that John
          designs.
          > However, if you email John, or post a message on his Yahoo group
          > (JWBuilders), you could get an informed opinion.
          >
          > Peter
        • pvanderwaart
          ... Everything that follows is guess and opinion. I wouldn t blame the rig with some additional evidence. There are plenty of satisfied users of balanced lugs.
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 21, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            > The pointing is more problematic,
            > perhaps inherent in the balanced lug, I wouldn't know.

            Everything that follows is guess and opinion.

            I wouldn't blame the rig with some additional evidence. There are
            plenty of satisfied users of balanced lugs. It's quite possible that
            the sail area is small for the weight, though.

            The keel form is not going to shine on a close reach, or anything
            higher, and the slower the boat goes, the worse the keel will be. PCB
            says in The Floating Schooner she won't point without the leeboard. It
            would be interesting to know if the NZ boat uses the leeboard. It
            looks to me like one of those features that PCB drew despite a near
            certainty that it would never be built or used.

            PEter
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.