Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [bolger] Re: Heater up-date...good news!

Expand Messages
  • Wesley Cox
    Lewis is correct. A good way to check that a circuit is done correctly is that every component in the circuit must be rated to handle the maximum current of
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 3, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Lewis is correct. A good way to check that a circuit is done correctly
      is that every component in the circuit must be rated to handle the
      maximum current of the breaker, including wire, outlets and switches.
      That includes individual outlets, for instance. Electrical supply
      circuits are, by necessity, wired in parallel, in which case the current
      is the same in each branch (component) of the circuit. Standard (low
      cost) receptacles, in the US at least, are typically rated for 20 amps.
      The circuit in question could theoretically overload, but not short, and
      pull just under 30 amps, NOT tripping the 30 amp breaker. After a
      relatively short time, the 14 ga. wire and/or the outlet *will* overheat
      and *might* cause flame.

      Lewis E. Gordon wrote:

      >Peter,
      >
      >Congratulations on your being able to expand your "epoxy season" by
      >the use of the heaters. However, I have a safety concern with the 14
      >ga. wire on a 30 amp. breaker! The idea of fuses and circuit breakers
      >is to protect the wires in case of a short circuit. I normally use a
      >15 amp. breaker for 14 ga, 20 amp. for 12 ga. and a 30 amp. breaker
      >for 10 ga. (all 110 volt circuits or double pole breakers for 220
      >volt). I fear that your 14 ga. wires could burn through and never trip
      >the 30 amp circuit breaker!
      >
      >The online caculators I use:
      >http://www.csgnetwork.com/wiresizecalc.html
      >http://www.csgnetwork.com/voltagedropcalc.html
      >
      >say that 14 ga. is good for your load of 12.5 amps (1500 wats at 120
      >volt) up to a length of 45 feet. Above this length they say to use 12
      >ga. wire.
      >
      >Keep us posted!
      >Lewis
      >
      >--- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@h...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >>Bolgerados,
      >>
      >> Recently I querried the group for heater
      >>tips/suggestions/recommendations/reviews. My interest in particular
      >>was with electric oil-filled heaters.Based on the recieved group
      >>feed-back, I went ahead and purchased a Noma oil-filled heater and
      >>have been using it these past 2 weeks.This heater comes with 3 power
      >>settings(600,900 and 1500 watts),safety checks and switches up the
      >>yingyang and a"frost" setting.
      >> Well....although we have yet to get any deep winter cold yet up
      >>here, I have been able to work in t-shirt comfort inside the boat
      >>keeping a nice 65F.temps average.
      >> It was also an interesting thing to experience a relatively
      >>rapid rise with the inside temperatures which occured simply by
      >>laying in, dry, the stryofoam filler pieces...amazing what 2 inches
      >>can do sometimes:-)
      >> Of course,once they were properly epoxied in place and the
      >>gaps filled with some expanding foam-in-a-can,things started to get
      >>a wee bit too warm to work comfortably. I suspect that by the time
      >>I've finished insulating the entire interior,I'll be able to paint
      >>and varnish no matter how cold it gets outside.
      >> The best part however,is arriving first thing in the
      >>morning,entering a cold damp bowshed,climbing the ladder up to the
      >>boat and then feeling a gentle warm breeze flowing out of the cabin
      >>as I open the door into the boat.For some odd-ball reason, I always
      >>think of fresh pancakes and molasses each time this happens..........
      >> Oh yes and I did rig up a seperate/dedicated power line for the
      >>heater with some outdoor rated 14gw grounded wire running off a 30
      >>amp outlet.Despite running the heater now for the past 13 days full-
      >>time,at the medium setting, I have yet to detect even the slightest
      >>warmth from the plugs.I take this to be a good sign :-)
      >> At any rate,just wanted to let you all know that so far this
      >>heater seems to be just the ticket for comfy inside winter work and
      >>that it now appears to be safe enough for full-time,un-attended use.
      >>
      >>Thanks to all who rendered endorsements!
      >>
      >>
      >>Sincerely,
      >>
      >>Peter Lenihan,looking forward to the worst winter has to throw while
      >>I play"boatbuilder" and remain as comfortable as a pig-in-a-
      >>blanket........and a thirsty pig to boot!
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Bolger rules!!!
      >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
      >- stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
      >- Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
      >- Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
      >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >- Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Peter Lenihan
      ... 14 ... breakers ... a ... trip ... 120 ... 12 ... Hi Lewis, It is good and interesting that you post this! I went back to re-read what I had written and
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 5, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
        <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Peter,
        >
        > Congratulations on your being able to expand your "epoxy season" by
        > the use of the heaters. However, I have a safety concern with the
        14
        > ga. wire on a 30 amp. breaker! The idea of fuses and circuit
        breakers
        > is to protect the wires in case of a short circuit. I normally use
        a
        > 15 amp. breaker for 14 ga, 20 amp. for 12 ga. and a 30 amp. breaker
        > for 10 ga. (all 110 volt circuits or double pole breakers for 220
        > volt). I fear that your 14 ga. wires could burn through and never
        trip
        > the 30 amp circuit breaker!
        >
        > The online caculators I use:
        > http://www.csgnetwork.com/wiresizecalc.html
        > http://www.csgnetwork.com/voltagedropcalc.html
        >
        > say that 14 ga. is good for your load of 12.5 amps (1500 wats at
        120
        > volt) up to a length of 45 feet. Above this length they say to use
        12
        > ga. wire.
        >
        > Keep us posted!
        > Lewis
        >

        Hi Lewis,

        It is good and interesting that you post this! I went back
        to re-read what I had written and saw too that I had written 14
        guage wire.In fact,it is 12 gauge with solid wire(as apposed to the
        fine stranded twisted variety).Mind must have been thinking
        something else and got confused.

        And just this past Friday,while
        showing off my new heater set-up to my boatbuilding neighbour at the
        yard, I learnt that I was plugged into a 15 amp outlet. I had looked
        into the box earlier in the year and re-called seeing the breakers,
        in
        pairs,rated at 15 amp each but somehow thinking this was 30amp
        combined....My boatyard neighbour is building a 40' Roberts Spray
        and knows about electricity for all his welding needs, kindly walked
        me through my set-up and explained to me how I was in fact hooked up
        to only one 15 amp breaker not both of them for a total,he chuckled,
        of 30! Oh
        BOY....me stupider then me thought! The good news is that there is
        lots and lots of room for me to learn still and I will now most
        certainly get a professional to over-see my interior wiring needs.

        Again, I appreciate the information Lewis and will strive to get it
        righter/safer before I,heaven forbid, burn the whole place down:-)

        Well,off to study those links provided......


        Thankful and sincere,

        Peter Lenihan, who still doesn't understand how when someone
        explains something to me it all makes perfect sense and yet when
        alone, I can't for the life of me remember a single thing
        straight.It is not like I am all that dense "upstairs" either since
        I take great pains to keep it all soft and spongy bathed in high
        alcohol solution..............hmmmmmm.........little lights are
        starting to blink over me skull.........:-D
      • Lewis E. Gordon
        Peter, That s good news! Electricity is fun, and I m sure that by launch day you will be expert at both AC and DC. (That s concerning electricity of course.)
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 5, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Peter,

          That's good news! Electricity is fun, and I'm sure that by launch day
          you will be expert at both AC and DC. (That's concerning electricity
          of course.) DC doesn't bite like AC but it can still start fires and
          do other bad things to boats. I used to work around 1500 amp. circuits
          at 5 volt DC and one learns to respect those little electrons very
          quickly!

          Lewis
          On the north shore of Lake Nicaragua where it is a nice 29.5 C with
          sunny blue skies and the lake breeze blowing through the windows.


          > >
          >
          > Hi Lewis,
          >
          > It is good and interesting that you post this! I went back
          > to re-read what I had written and saw too that I had written 14
          > guage wire.In fact,it is 12 gauge with solid wire(as apposed to the
          > fine stranded twisted variety).Mind must have been thinking
          > something else and got confused.
          >
          > And just this past Friday,while
          > showing off my new heater set-up to my boatbuilding neighbour at the
          > yard, I learnt that I was plugged into a 15 amp outlet. I had looked
          > into the box earlier in the year and re-called seeing the breakers,
          > in
          > pairs,rated at 15 amp each but somehow thinking this was 30amp
          > combined....My boatyard neighbour is building a 40' Roberts Spray
          > and knows about electricity for all his welding needs, kindly walked
          > me through my set-up and explained to me how I was in fact hooked up
          > to only one 15 amp breaker not both of them for a total,he chuckled,
          > of 30! Oh
          > BOY....me stupider then me thought! The good news is that there is
          > lots and lots of room for me to learn still and I will now most
          > certainly get a professional to over-see my interior wiring needs.
          >
          > Again, I appreciate the information Lewis and will strive to get it
          > righter/safer before I,heaven forbid, burn the whole place down:-)
          >
          > Well,off to study those links provided......
          >
          >
          > Thankful and sincere,
          >
          > Peter Lenihan, who still doesn't understand how when someone
          > explains something to me it all makes perfect sense and yet when
          > alone, I can't for the life of me remember a single thing
          > straight.It is not like I am all that dense "upstairs" either since
          > I take great pains to keep it all soft and spongy bathed in high
          > alcohol solution..............hmmmmmm.........little lights are
          > starting to blink over me skull.........:-D
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.