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Re: kayak sailing,

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  • Nels
    Hi Paul, Very interesting advice:-) (Mark - by the way - Is Mark Balogh - whose link I provided earlier and is a designer of kayak sailing accesories.) I agree
    Message 1 of 75 , Dec 2, 2005
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      Hi Paul,

      Very interesting advice:-) (Mark - by the way - Is Mark Balogh -
      whose link I provided earlier and is a designer of kayak sailing
      accesories.)

      I agree that a paddle is not the best way to steer a kayak, unlike a
      canoe where one is sitting in the stern seat when sailing. A foot-
      pedal controlled rudder is also a great energy saver when paddling
      into a quartering wind.

      Bolger states in his article that a person could lop the ends
      off "DIAMOND" and not lose performance, so by lopping off a bit of
      the stern overhang it would allow a rudder to be installed. Perhaps
      one might want to have a shallow skeg as well? What ya think?

      With a rudder, a narrow kayak can also be paddled with a single
      paddle to utilize different muscles. (Some kayak paddles convert to
      two single paddles.)

      The topsides of DIAMOND might make it easy to clamp on a small
      leeboard as well. Or a single paddle?

      A pair of DIAMONDS could also be joined together using lengths of
      light tubing, thus becoming a very stable cat for two people. Could
      even take turns sailing/paddling and resting.

      During their 30,000 mile canoe odessey, Verlan Kruger and Mike
      Landick used that stratedgy while traversing the Great Lakes and
      other large water bodies. The tubes did double duty as a frame for a
      wind shelter ashore if memory serves me. They travelled in single
      person covered canoes that could be paddled either with a single or
      double paddle.

      Paul - what was the sail model that you used?

      Thanks, Nels

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Lefebvre" <paul@w...> wrote:
      >
      > I've sailed kayaks for about 15 years, and while I would probably
      never
      > choose to sail without a rudder, I have experimented with
      balancing the
      > leeboards against the sail - I don't think it'd be a long-term
      solution, but
      > it's a fun exercise in safe waters.
    • Lincoln Ross
      I m not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any case, I m sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion. However, I think at the
      Message 75 of 75 , Apr 5 6:56 AM
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        I'm not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any
        case, I'm sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion.
        However, I think at the partners, and perhaps elsewhere, localized
        crushing is part of the picture. In that case I'm guessing fiberglass
        would remain superior. Not that you couldn't have a bit of dynel over it.
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
        >
        > One layer of dynel is 6 times as abrasion resistance as 1 layer of 6oz
        > glass per some tests in Boatbuilder several years ago.
        >
        > HJ
        >
        > pvanderwaart wrote:
        > >> What about armoring the mast with fiberglass and epoxy at the
        > >>
        > > partners and other wear
        > >
        > >> points? Or wrapping it with some other thing to prevent wear?
        snip
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