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Re: [bolger] Diamond

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  • Wesley Cox
    The bottom is very interesting. I hadn t pictured it quite like that from the in the water picture and description. My 2 favorite choices in small boat for
    Message 1 of 75 , Dec 1, 2005
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      The bottom is very interesting. I hadn't pictured it quite like that
      from the in the water picture and description.

      My 2 favorite choices in small boat for some time have been kayak, about
      which I know little but they fascinate me, and a double ended, double
      chine rowing dory with generous flare abeam and at the stems. Similar
      to your boat in overall shape, if memory serves, but fewer chines, less
      curvy and a little shorter to keep the weight down.

      I keep remembering your post saying that one of your kids in a double
      paddle canoe outpaced you in your row boat. I'm not out for speed, but
      I can imagine at times wanting to get somewhere with minimal paddling
      effort. Hence, the eternal, internal battle of compromise in boats...

      Thanks, Bruce.


      Bruce Hallman wrote:

      >On 12/1/05, Sam Glasscock wrote:
      >
      >
      >>Nels, I somehow missed the MAIB write-up. Can you
      >>post any information about Diamond?
      >>
      >>
      >
      >Diamond is also known as "Crusing Kayak" and was written up in MAIB twice.
      >
      >I was just studing the lines in FREE!ship, and the geometry is truly
      >amazing (and fascinating), as the shape of the hull is essentially
      >defined by only eleven points.
      >
      >See:
      >
      >http://hallman.org/freeship/Diamond.jpg
      >
      >for a screenshot
      >and
      >
      >http://hallman.org/freeship/Diamond.fbm
      >
      >for the FREE!ship file
      >
      >I would be concerned that a decked 19'6" x 1'11" boat would be a bit
      >much to carry around single handed. My personal choice for rowing in
      >a rough lake, walking distance from my house, would be my double ended
      >rowboat "Cartoon 5".
      >
      >
      >
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    • Lincoln Ross
      I m not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any case, I m sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion. However, I think at the
      Message 75 of 75 , Apr 5, 2006
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        I'm not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any
        case, I'm sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion.
        However, I think at the partners, and perhaps elsewhere, localized
        crushing is part of the picture. In that case I'm guessing fiberglass
        would remain superior. Not that you couldn't have a bit of dynel over it.
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
        >
        > One layer of dynel is 6 times as abrasion resistance as 1 layer of 6oz
        > glass per some tests in Boatbuilder several years ago.
        >
        > HJ
        >
        > pvanderwaart wrote:
        > >> What about armoring the mast with fiberglass and epoxy at the
        > >>
        > > partners and other wear
        > >
        > >> points? Or wrapping it with some other thing to prevent wear?
        snip
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