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Re: Trolling motor for Micro Take 3

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  • bsdbatwing
    After reading your comments below one solution comes to mind though I do not know of a Bolger plan that fits. For the ultimate in seaworthiness, portability
    Message 1 of 75 , Dec 1, 2005
      After reading your comments below one solution comes to mind
      though I do not know of a Bolger plan that fits. For the ultimate in
      seaworthiness, portability and versatility in your location you may
      want to consider a kayak with outriggers and sailing rig. Kayaks
      can be rendered comfortable with a good seat, and with the
      option of sail rig and outriggers fill the need of paddle and sail
      boat in an easily transported and rigged package. CLC is one
      company that offers plans for plywood kayak outriggers that
      could be adapted to most home built kayaks or canoes.
      http://www.clcboats.com/ Sailing kayaks have crossed the
      Atlantic and traversed the NW Passage among other feats.
      Mark

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Wesley Cox <inspirfe@d...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Jon,
      >
      > I agree. Every time I try to convince myself of the practicality of
      > electric propulsion, I conclude that as much as I wish it were
      > practical, it just isn't, at least not for me.
      >
      > I'm a big fan of the work on your web site. I'm considering
      something
      > similar to a Toto, but am torn between my usual tiny boat
      desires,
      > weight vs. sea worthiness. I've never used a kayak and am
      hesitant to
      > go that route. There's no questioning their sea worthiness, but
      I do
      > question the comfort level. I relocated 3 months ago and am
      now 4
      > blocks from Lake Michigan. There is public parking 20 yards
      from the
      > water, but the only boat ramp charges a daily fee or yearly
      membership
      > and is used by big stink pot fishing boats. When I have a sail
      boat, it
      > will be the only one here. In any case, sail boat or no, I would
      like a
      > boat I can readily carry for, hopefully, daily use. The catch is the
      > big lake gets rough and the best alternative is 30 miles away.
      It seems
      > a shame to have to drive to paddle when the water is so close.
      Would
      > you care to comment on the stability of the open canoe type
      Toto? Thanks.
    • Lincoln Ross
      I m not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any case, I m sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion. However, I think at the
      Message 75 of 75 , Apr 5, 2006
        I'm not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any
        case, I'm sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion.
        However, I think at the partners, and perhaps elsewhere, localized
        crushing is part of the picture. In that case I'm guessing fiberglass
        would remain superior. Not that you couldn't have a bit of dynel over it.
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
        >
        > One layer of dynel is 6 times as abrasion resistance as 1 layer of 6oz
        > glass per some tests in Boatbuilder several years ago.
        >
        > HJ
        >
        > pvanderwaart wrote:
        > >> What about armoring the mast with fiberglass and epoxy at the
        > >>
        > > partners and other wear
        > >
        > >> points? Or wrapping it with some other thing to prevent wear?
        snip
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