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Re: Toto Double Paddle Canoe (was: Trolling motor for Micro Take 3)

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  • Bryant Owen
    Wes. Could I suggest you post your Toto question on the dwforum group (Chuck had a Toto) or the Michalak group. Even better would be the Duckworks plan listing
    Message 1 of 75 , Dec 1, 2005
      Wes. Could I suggest you post your Toto question on the dwforum group
      (Chuck had a Toto) or the Michalak group. Even better would be the
      Duckworks plan listing

      http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/toto/index.htm

      Bryant - who has a Toto laid out for cutting/building this spring.

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography"
      <jon@k...> wrote:
      >
      > Wesley,
      >
      > > I'm a big fan of the work on your web site.
      >
      > Thanks very much!
      >
      > > I'm considering something
      > > similar to a Toto, but am torn between my usual tiny boat desires,
      > > weight vs. sea worthiness. I've never used a kayak and am hesitant
      > to
      > > go that route. There's no questioning their sea worthiness, but I do
      > > question the comfort level.
      >
      > ...snip...
      >
      > > Would
      > > you care to comment on the stability of the open canoe type Toto?
      > > Thanks.
      >
      > We've only had the Totos out a couple of times since I finished them
      > this past summer. I'd say they have about 6 miles under them, all in
      > relatively wake-free water and light winds. Because the water in the
      > reservoir we boat at is always cold, I decked over the bow and stern
      > sections to provide lots of positive bouyancy and hopefully allow a
      > person to get back aboard after going over. I still have doubts about
      > whether reentry of the boat from the water can actually be achieved,
      > and the water is colder than I care to experiment in. If we take one
      > up to McConaughy next summer, I'll try it there.
      >
      > Having said that, I haven't ever felt unstable in these canoes, and
      > since your butt is right on the bottom, it's as stable as you can make
      > it. The v-shaped entry certainly cuts through small waves and wakes
      > with no fuss, and the truncated v-shaped midsection seems to take small
      > waves from abeam pretty well. Nevertheless, we follow the shoreline
      > fairly closely, and always wear PFDs - anyone using a boat like this
      > should ALWAYS wear a PFD. Considering how cheap and fast these are to
      > build, I wouldn't hestitate to try one out if I were you. They are fun
      > and relaxing boats to use, and if it doesn't work out, your loss of
      > time and money is minimal.
      >
      > Jon Kolb
      > www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
      >
    • Lincoln Ross
      I m not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any case, I m sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion. However, I think at the
      Message 75 of 75 , Apr 5 6:56 AM
        I'm not sure the quoting is still accurate in this thread. In any
        case, I'm sure the Dynel is good if the issue is just abrasion.
        However, I think at the partners, and perhaps elsewhere, localized
        crushing is part of the picture. In that case I'm guessing fiberglass
        would remain superior. Not that you couldn't have a bit of dynel over it.
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
        >
        > One layer of dynel is 6 times as abrasion resistance as 1 layer of 6oz
        > glass per some tests in Boatbuilder several years ago.
        >
        > HJ
        >
        > pvanderwaart wrote:
        > >> What about armoring the mast with fiberglass and epoxy at the
        > >>
        > > partners and other wear
        > >
        > >> points? Or wrapping it with some other thing to prevent wear?
        snip
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