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Free!Ship study of Shivaree

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  • Bruce Hallman
    Attached is a study of one Phil Bolger s favorite designs, Shivaree. An outboard runabout, 18 ft x 7 ft, rough water capable, and one of the few Bolger designs
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 29, 2005
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      Attached is a study of one Phil Bolger's favorite designs, Shivaree.
      An outboard runabout, 18 ft x 7 ft, rough water capable, and one of
      the few Bolger designs that he has chosen to personally own.

      Image

      http://www.hallman.org/bolger/648/Shivaree.jpg

      fbm file

      http://www.hallman.org/bolger/648/shivaree.fbm
    • echo172@comcast.net
      I ve spent months selecting a boat for my needs. After much research I decided on the 648. Having just recieved the plans from PB&F this week, your images
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 30, 2005
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        I've spent months selecting a boat for my needs. After much research I decided on the 648. Having just recieved the plans from PB&F this week, your images inspire my question. Can the program make accurate cross sections for mold making and patterns? I am just now sorting through the books I ordered to learn how to translate lines into a 3D model.
        Thanks,
        Bruce in NJ


        > Attached is a study of one Phil Bolger's favorite designs, Shivaree.
        > An outboard runabout, 18 ft x 7 ft, rough water capable, and one of
        > the few Bolger designs that he has chosen to personally own.
        >
        > Image
        >
        > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/648/Shivaree.jpg
        >
        > fbm file
        >
        > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/648/shivaree.fbm
        >
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978)
        > 282-1349
        > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... I am curious what the plans show. If the plans don t have dimensions for frames, then at the very least you could make frames after lofting the hull
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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          On 11/30/05, echo172@... <echo172@...> wrote:
          > I've spent months selecting a boat for my needs. After much research I decided on the 648. Having just recieved the plans from PB&F this week,

          I am curious what the plans show. If the plans don't have dimensions
          for frames, then at the very least you could make frames after
          'lofting' the hull from the table of offsets.

          > your images inspire my question. Can the program make accurate cross sections for mold making and patterns?

          I am just now learning, and I do not know the answer to your question.
          I think it can now, and also I recall reading that the 'frames'
          feature is slated for the next version release of the program.


          >I am just now sorting through the books I ordered to learn how to
          translate lines into a 3D model.

          Just cutting out the strakes, printed with a laser printer on
          cardboard allows you to make a 3D model. I have a Shivaree model
          right now.
        • Bruce Hallman
          ... mold making and patterns? I am just now sorting through the books I ordered to learn how to translate lines into a 3D model. ... Yes, Free!Ship can make
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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            >inspire my question. Can the program make accurate cross sections for
            mold making and patterns? I am just now sorting through the books I
            ordered to learn how to translate lines into a 3D model.
            > Bruce in NJ

            Yes, Free!Ship can make accurate bulkheads, [using the
            Point!InsertPlane command]. It is a bit clunky, but I just did a test
            of it, and did get a developed bulkhead. Hint, the edges of the
            bulkheads must be made 'crease edges'. Hopefully, with practice, I
            can get over the learning curve trouble with this.
          • Harry James
            Are these bulkheads less the hull thickness? By the way thanks for your pioneering efforts on this Bruce, when I eventually get around to playing with freeship
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 3, 2005
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              Are these bulkheads less the hull thickness?

              By the way thanks for your pioneering efforts on this Bruce, when I
              eventually get around to playing with freeship I already will have had a
              tutorial courtesy of your commentary here.

              HJ

              Bruce Hallman wrote:

              >>inspire my question. Can the program make accurate cross sections for
              >>
              >>
              >mold making and patterns? I am just now sorting through the books I
              >ordered to learn how to translate lines into a 3D model.
              >
              >
              >>Bruce in NJ
              >>
              >>
              >
              >Yes, Free!Ship can make accurate bulkheads, [using the
              >Point!InsertPlane command]. It is a bit clunky, but I just did a test
              >of it, and did get a developed bulkhead. Hint, the edges of the
              >bulkheads must be made 'crease edges'. Hopefully, with practice, I
              >can get over the learning curve trouble with this.
              >
              >
              >
              >Bolger rules!!!
              >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
              >- stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              >- Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
              >- Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >- Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Bruce Hallman
              ... No, the skin in FREE!ship is perfectly thin, so like with conventional lofting, you need to subtract the thickness of the plank.
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 4, 2005
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                On 12/3/05, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
                > Are these bulkheads less the hull thickness?

                No, the 'skin' in FREE!ship is perfectly thin, so like with
                conventional lofting, you need to subtract the thickness of the plank.
              • Harry James
                When the plank is at an angle the amount would be greater than plank thickness. Been a while since I have read up on lofting, how do you do this? HJ
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 6, 2005
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                  When the plank is at an angle the amount would be greater than plank
                  thickness. Been a while since I have read up on lofting, how do you do
                  this?

                  HJ

                  Bruce Hallman wrote:

                  >On 12/3/05, Harry James <welshman@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >>Are these bulkheads less the hull thickness?
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >No, the 'skin' in FREE!ship is perfectly thin, so like with
                  >conventional lofting, you need to subtract the thickness of the plank.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Bruce Hallman
                  ... I am not an expert, but the last time I did it [with Cartoon#5] I just made the frames square, and took the belt sander with a 36 grit belt to the frames
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 6, 2005
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                    > When the plank is at an angle the amount would be greater than plank
                    > thickness. Been a while since I have read up on lofting, how do you do
                    > this?

                    I am not an expert, but the last time I did it [with Cartoon#5] I just
                    made the frames square, and took the belt sander with a 36 grit belt
                    to the frames and beveled them to 'eye', working up, one strake at a
                    time. In the end, boat building isn't rocket science.
                  • Harry James
                    Frame bevels are relatively easy, it was the reduction of the frame for plank thickness that I was curious about, starts to make a lot of difference with plank
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 6, 2005
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                      Frame bevels are relatively easy, it was the reduction of the frame for
                      plank thickness that I was curious about, starts to make a lot of
                      difference with plank thicknesses of 1/2 in or more.

                      Oh well, out with the Goudgeon Bros book next time I take up a big
                      project. Excellent section on lofting. They have a new update out by
                      the way.

                      HJ

                      Bruce Hallman wrote:

                      >>When the plank is at an angle the amount would be greater than plank
                      >>thickness. Been a while since I have read up on lofting, how do you do
                      >>this?
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >I am not an expert, but the last time I did it [with Cartoon#5] I just
                      >made the frames square, and took the belt sander with a 36 grit belt
                      >to the frames and beveled them to 'eye', working up, one strake at a
                      >time. In the end, boat building isn't rocket science.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Bolger rules!!!
                      >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                      >- stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                      >- Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                      >- Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                      >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >- Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Bruce Hallman
                      ... The depth of the plank cut into the frame increases with the ratio of 1/cosine(angle) so, 1 / cosine(15 degrees) = 1.03527618 = 3.5% increased thickness
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 7, 2005
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                        > Oh well,

                        The depth of the plank cut into the frame increases with the ratio of
                        1/cosine(angle)
                        so, 1 / cosine(15 degrees) = 1.03527618 = 3.5% increased thickness

                        You can plug it into Google to figure out

                        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=1%2Fcosine%2815+degrees%29&btnG=Search

                        http://tinyurl.com/9t98u
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