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Re: Latest WINDERMERE progress photos

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  • Nels
    ... 16 ... Hi James, Although what you say is true, it may be rather impractical to install a wood-burning stove with feeder in a temporary boat shelter. The
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 6, 2005
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, James Greene <jg6892@g...> wrote:
      >
      > Wood burning stoves dry thing out, and that's just the opposite of
      > creating moisture build-up. There are numerous wood buring stoves
      > available with automatic feeders that will run for far longer than
      16
      > hours at a time before the fuel hopper is empty.
      >
      > James Greene

      Hi James,

      Although what you say is true, it may be rather impractical to
      install a wood-burning stove with feeder in a temporary boat
      shelter. The chimney construction alone is a rather formidable
      expense and also involves certain zoning regulations up here in
      Canada.

      An RV furnace would be a viable alternative. They have a totaly
      enclosed combustion chamber with heat exchanger and can be vented
      outside with a straight double walled tube which draws outside air
      in through the outer section and exhausts the fumes through the
      inner section. Most of these use propane which can be connected from
      outside the shop.

      The drawback is that one can buy several electric heaters for the
      price of one of these and not have to worry about venting or propane
      tanks.

      Using electrical resistance is one hell of an inefficient way to
      create heat but electricity is relatively cheap in Canada. Even
      compared to wood. Especially if your rental space includes free
      electricity.

      I really like the idea of an electric blanket. That way if you
      indulge in one too many goblets of port just crawl under the blanket
      and you can dream of tropical sand beaches while at the same time
      helping your epoxy cure:-)

      Nels

      Nels
    • Peter Lenihan
      ... Only a real prairre pirate,accustomed to the undulating waves of wheat from Canadas sub-tropical zone would ever consider crawling into bed with a few
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
        > I really like the idea of an electric blanket. That way if you
        > indulge in one too many goblets of port just crawl under the blanket
        > and you can dream of tropical sand beaches while at the same time
        > helping your epoxy cure:-)
        >
        > Nels


        Only a real prairre pirate,accustomed to the undulating waves of wheat
        from Canadas' sub-tropical zone would ever consider crawling into bed
        with a few bits of wood and some un-cured epoxy.The thought of waking
        with a substantial and now permanent"woody" appended to ones anatomy
        is a...er....rather scary at best,no matter how giddy it makes the
        ladies or however much they may be seen to fall to their knees,arms
        out-stretched,gazing toward the ceiling and repeating in a loud
        voice,"Thank you Jesus!Thank you Jesus!My prayers have been answered!"

        Beyond that and FYI,there is no such animal as"too-many-goblets-of-
        port" however there does exist in the more obscure annals of medical
        science such a creature as"emptybottleitis"(pronounced "crying shame")
        and this can lead to a wide range of behaviors,least of which is
        running stark neked down mainstreet screaming like a banshee for ones
        mommy as we try to locate the nearest clinic(pronounced"liquore
        store") to re-new our prescription(pronounced"bottle").All reasonable
        means should be employed to avoid contracting this miserable
        affliction.See Big Bad Bruce,AKA Le Baron de Kingston for appropriate
        actions regarding prevention/remedy.

        Just trying to be helpful :-)

        Sincerely,

        Peter Lenihan,with anti-bodies galore and lots of medicine in the wine
        cellar.....OOOPS!.....I mean medicine cabinet :-)
      • Paul Lefebvre
        Peter, I ve had several of those oil-filled electric radiators that I ve used in my basement wood shop, garage, and most importantly, inside my micro last
        Message 3 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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          Peter,

          I've had several of those oil-filled electric radiators that I've used in my
          basement wood shop, garage, and most importantly, inside my micro last
          winter for some interior work. They work great and are very safe, though you
          may need 2 or 3 for a space the size of the interior of your boat. If there
          is a weak point/high risk area it may be the extension cord you use to run
          it - I noticed on one occasion when I had one running on 'high' (1500W)
          while plugged into a lighter-duty cord (shop quality, but not the real thick
          ones) that the area around the socket, and the wire right nearby, got too
          hot to touch. So if you're real concerned about safety -and who wouldn't be
          after so much work and such a beautiful product starting to show itself-
          invest in some high-grade wires to hook it up.

          Bought the lumber for my hoop-shed Saturday; hope to use the upcoming long
          weekend to get a snowproof (this time!) boatshed erected so I can finish up
          my Micro before next June!

          Paul Lefebvre

          -----Original Message-----
          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
          Peter Lenihan
          Sent: Monday, November 07, 2005 4:18 AM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Latest WINDERMERE progress photos


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
          > I really like the idea of an electric blanket. That way if you
          > indulge in one too many goblets of port just crawl under the blanket
          > and you can dream of tropical sand beaches while at the same time
          > helping your epoxy cure:-)
          >
          > Nels


          Only a real prairre pirate,accustomed to the undulating waves of wheat
          from Canadas' sub-tropical zone would ever consider crawling into bed
          with a few bits of wood and some un-cured epoxy.The thought of waking
          with a substantial and now permanent"woody" appended to ones anatomy
          is a...er....rather scary at best,no matter how giddy it makes the
          ladies or however much they may be seen to fall to their knees,arms
          out-stretched,gazing toward the ceiling and repeating in a loud
          voice,"Thank you Jesus!Thank you Jesus!My prayers have been answered!"

          Beyond that and FYI,there is no such animal as"too-many-goblets-of-
          port" however there does exist in the more obscure annals of medical
          science such a creature as"emptybottleitis"(pronounced "crying shame")
          and this can lead to a wide range of behaviors,least of which is
          running stark neked down mainstreet screaming like a banshee for ones
          mommy as we try to locate the nearest clinic(pronounced"liquore
          store") to re-new our prescription(pronounced"bottle").All reasonable
          means should be employed to avoid contracting this miserable
          affliction.See Big Bad Bruce,AKA Le Baron de Kingston for appropriate
          actions regarding prevention/remedy.

          Just trying to be helpful :-)

          Sincerely,

          Peter Lenihan,with anti-bodies galore and lots of medicine in the wine
          cellar.....OOOPS!.....I mean medicine cabinet :-)







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        • adventures_in_astrophotography
          Hi Peter, ... ...snip... Wow! Nice work, indeed. How many miles of fillets that must be! ... We use one of these oil radiator types in our basement. Can t
          Message 4 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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            Hi Peter,

            > I've posted my latest set of progress photos,with captions,
            > over in the Bolger 4 files section here:
            ...snip...

            Wow! Nice work, indeed. How many miles of fillets that must be!

            > If anyone knows of a good,reliable,safe and portable electric
            > heater which can be left un-attended for 16 hour stretches....I
            > would really appreciate hearing from you. As it is now, I'm
            > considering one of those portable oil-filled electric heaters that
            > resemble the old water pipe radiators of lore...........

            We use one of these oil radiator types in our basement. Can't remember
            the brand, but we've used it for hours and hours on end with no
            troubles over perhaps 7 or 8 years now.

            Jon Kolb
            http://www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
          • Philip Smith
            Since you really only need to warm the boat while the epoxy is being applied, I can imagine an open bottom box that fits over the boat. I d make the box out of
            Message 5 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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              Since you really only need to warm the boat while the
              epoxy is being applied, I can imagine an open bottom
              box that fits over the boat. I'd make the box out of
              thick rigid foam insulation, probably in two or more
              parts, so I could keep it knocked down and out of the
              way when I was attempting to get work done. An
              electric heater or two under the boat and the box
              could keep everything in the box nice and toasty.

              This would allow you to experiment with Robb White's
              theory of hot wood in a cool environment drawing the
              expoxy into the wood's pores for deeper penetration.
              Warm the structure to be epoxied up in it's little
              hard sided tent. Mix the epoxy, which you could keep
              warm in a discarded refrigerator with a light bulb
              inside it. Knock down the warming structure. Apply the
              goop to the warm/hot wood or cloth on wood. Let the
              wood cool down and draw the epoxy into it's little
              pores.

              Of course if you are building a big boat it might be
              difficult to construct the structure. However if you
              are building the boat pannel by pannel in Bolger
              approved fashion, the structure wouldn't have to be
              very tall. It wouldn't necessarily have to extend all
              the way to the floor. Curtains could keep out the
              drafts and physics can keep the heat on the work area.

              If it worked really well on the pannels you could
              extend the sides to join the pannels together or slack
              off until warm weather...

              Just a thought.

              Phil Smith
            • Lewis E. Gordon
              Peter, Thanks for the kind offer of a snowscape postcard, but I really don t miss that wet white stuff! Just post a photo this winter of the snow half way up
              Message 6 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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                Peter,

                Thanks for the kind offer of a snowscape postcard, but I really don't
                miss that wet white stuff! Just post a photo this winter of the snow
                half way up your boat building shed! Than again, this is supposed to
                be a warm winter in North America. I guess all these hurricane heat
                pumps have shifted our heat to the north. I always enjoy your posts
                for the humor that must help you keep your sanity is such a large
                building project.

                Paul made a good point in an earlier reply about extension cords.
                Unfortunately, thickness does not always equal sufficient wire gauge!
                I have seen extension cords as thick as my thumb with puny 14 ga.
                wire! You have to look closely. In my shop I have two 50 foot, 10 ga.,
                four conductor cords surplused from a large computer de-installation
                years ago. They sure are handy!

                Cheers, and looking forward to more progress photos. We all hope to
                see some soon of Windmere in the water.

                Lewis,
                On the shores of Lake Nicaragua looking out the window on a beautiful
                day with a gentle wind blowing in off the lake.


                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@h...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
                > <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
                > >When in the States, we used one of the oil filled
                > > radiator heaters for twenty years with great success. Of course
                > that
                > > was in Tennessee and North Carolina where the winters were not too
                > > bad. Ours had a "tip over" switch (which worked) and was not too
                > bad
                > > on electricity usage on the low setting (which I think was about
                > 550
                > > watts). I would trust one of these for 16 hours of unattended
                > usage.
                > >
                > > Lewis
                >
                > Thanks Lewis! That's exactly what I was hoping to hear,solid
                > experience with a reliable and SAFE heater. I think I'm just about
                > sold on them now. And yes,come to think about it,if I were to use
                > any type of combustable fuel,no matter how safe,I will have a high
                > moisture condensation problem once the really cold weather gets here.
                > Want me to send you a post-card with a lovely picture of deep snow
                > on it.....just so you don't get too spoiled with all that warm
                > weather down your way? :-)
                >
                > Sincerely,
                >
                > Peter Lenihan
                >
              • Nels
                ... I always enjoy your posts ... Humor? What humor? Sanity? What sanity? ... gauge! ... ga., ... installation ... I would also like to add, that I agree it
                Message 7 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
                  <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Peter,
                  I always enjoy your posts
                  > for the humor that must help you keep your sanity in such a large
                  > building project.

                  Humor? What humor? Sanity? What sanity?
                  >
                  > Paul made a good point in an earlier reply about extension cords.
                  > Unfortunately, thickness does not always equal sufficient wire
                  gauge!
                  > I have seen extension cords as thick as my thumb with puny 14 ga.
                  > wire! You have to look closely. In my shop I have two 50 foot, 10
                  ga.,
                  > four conductor cords surplused from a large computer de-
                  installation
                  > years ago. They sure are handy!

                  I would also like to add, that I agree it will take more than one
                  oil-filled radiator to heat that much volume and also one should
                  consider that there is still power required for the lights and tool
                  usage. One would require two heavy duty extension cords.

                  Therefor if one is going to get serious it might be cheaper and far
                  safer to install a subpanel directly from the main panel of the
                  building from where you are getting your power supply. A 60 amp sub-
                  panel would use shielded 6/3 cable which is far superior and cheaper
                  than two extension cords. (You have to bury it at least 18" though.)

                  It would be equivalent to running power to a one-car garage.

                  http://ths.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/wiring/2005015726007600.html

                  Nels
                • Philip Smith
                  Nels is correct. Then you also want to make sure that your house s pannel and service is adequate for the additional demand. This sort of seems like an endless
                  Message 8 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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                    Nels is correct. Then you also want to make sure that
                    your house's pannel and service is adequate for the
                    additional demand.

                    This sort of seems like an endless and potentially
                    expensive loop, but new pannels and adequate service
                    are less expensive than burning up either the boat and
                    shed or the house or the house, the boat and the shed.
                    (Don't park in the garage. Keep some sleeping bags in
                    the car...)

                    Phil Smith

                    --- Nels <arvent@...> wrote:

                    > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
                    > <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Peter,
                    > I always enjoy your posts
                    > > for the humor that must help you keep your sanity
                    > in such a large
                    > > building project.
                    >
                    > Humor? What humor? Sanity? What sanity?
                    > >
                    > > Paul made a good point in an earlier reply about
                    > extension cords.
                    > > Unfortunately, thickness does not always equal
                    > sufficient wire
                    > gauge!
                    > > I have seen extension cords as thick as my thumb
                    > with puny 14 ga.
                    > > wire! You have to look closely. In my shop I have
                    > two 50 foot, 10
                    > ga.,
                    > > four conductor cords surplused from a large
                    > computer de-
                    > installation
                    > > years ago. They sure are handy!
                    >
                    > I would also like to add, that I agree it will take
                    > more than one
                    > oil-filled radiator to heat that much volume and
                    > also one should
                    > consider that there is still power required for the
                    > lights and tool
                    > usage. One would require two heavy duty extension
                    > cords.
                    >
                    > Therefor if one is going to get serious it might be
                    > cheaper and far
                    > safer to install a subpanel directly from the main
                    > panel of the
                    > building from where you are getting your power
                    > supply. A 60 amp sub-
                    > panel would use shielded 6/3 cable which is far
                    > superior and cheaper
                    > than two extension cords. (You have to bury it at
                    > least 18" though.)
                    >
                    > It would be equivalent to running power to a one-car
                    > garage.
                    >
                    >
                    http://ths.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/wiring/2005015726007600.html
                    >
                    > Nels
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    > thanks, Fred' posts
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                    > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
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                  • Rick Bedard
                    A 2 1/2 drywall screw and a pair of plyers will get those pesky corks from bottles of California whites. Don t know if it works on Canadian reds.. Some tough
                    Message 9 of 20 , Nov 7, 2005
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                      A 2 1/2" drywall screw and a pair of plyers will get those pesky corks from bottles of California whites. Don't know if it works on Canadian reds..

                      Some tough sandpaper you got there...

                      BM's M 33/34, thanks. Now I remember.

                      The helm on Windermere sounds perfect...

                      My beam project came out perfect. It's for a boat of course. Plywood sailboat. Motorsailer really. Trailerable, shoal draft, 20' LOA, 8' beam. Boxy, but not Bolger, so pics will be posted eleswhere.

                      Thanks,
                      Rick




                      Hi Rick!
                      Thanks for the kind words! Yes,there are many hours of toil
                      (which is actually what I tell all my friends) but truth be
                      told,those are really many hours of some of the funnest toils I've
                      ever had.Of course,being nothing more then a boat-bum at heart,there
                      are also many hours of simple,mindless, gazing about and sipping
                      from goblettes various.Surely you can't count that as toil unless
                      you include hauling the cork up through the neck of the bottle
                      without a proper cork screw.I'm working on a patent for this device
                      as we speak :-)

                      The epoxy budget(ha!) long ago was dispatched into the ether
                      since it served no meaningful purpose other then to make me feel sad
                      for not buying stock in Dow Chemicals. Sanding,on the other hand,is
                      remarkably"cheap" since the paper I am using just doesn't want to
                      quit.The 40 weight takes hours to get down to 80 weight and that in
                      turn takes hours more before it reaches 100 weight.Imagine that,you
                      only need to buy one weight of paper for all your eventual finishing
                      needs:-) An added bonus with sanding,especially hand sanding,is that
                      it is a close cousin to all that mindless gazing refered to
                      above.You might say I've grown accustomed to this particular state
                      of mind..........



                      >
                      > Question 1
                      > I know we discussed this many months (years?) ago, but my menory
                      fails and I'm too lazy to search the archives. What primer / finish
                      paint have you decided to use?



                      For all outside surfaces,I use Benjamin Moores' M33/M34 polyamide
                      epoxy primer.This same stuff is also used everywhere bellow the
                      cabin sole ie;the entire bilge.Comes in two colours:Rogue Red and
                      Gay Gray
                      For outside colours,it will also be a Benjamin Moore product
                      aliphatic(sp) two part paint.Tough as bullets and colour fast.The
                      inside will see Sicos' Polyprep3 as base primer and finish coats
                      probable a nice thick oil based house paint.


                      > Question 2
                      > How high above the cabin sole is the helm station floor? From what
                      I can tell it looks quite a bit elevated. Is it? If so, did Bolger
                      design steps to get up or are you relying on the energy of your
                      youthful "spring in your step" to climb up there? Also, is there
                      headroom to stand behind the helm or do you drive standing on the
                      cabin sole next to the helm?


                      Cabin headroom throughout is a generous 6'6+,depending on where you
                      are standing.The helm station is on a slightly raised platform
                      requiring about a 7" step up(or down if you're just coming in
                      through the cabin to use the head ;-) )One can either stand or sit
                      at the helm station.Lots of room either way!Bellow the helm sole,is
                      the
                      forward battery storage hold for six large deep cycle batteries.The
                      other six are located against the aft bulkhead of the stateroom.This
                      considerable charge of batteries serves to give one impressive
                      autonomy and is considered critical to Windermeres' overall stability
                      (ballast/displacement ratio).The entire layout is done with great
                      consideration from our Hero for it effectively permits one to get
                      around anywhere in the boat on ones hands and knees, a potentially
                      useful feature,especially after a visit from Le Baron de Kingston:-)
                      >
                      > Heater thoughts.
                      >

                      Yup....combustion is definitely out of the question! Electric is the
                      way to go for me since it is already included in my rental fee for
                      my space and,based on pole results,can offer trouble free safe
                      heat.....or so I understand.It is the flaming red hot toaster
                      element in most heaters that does scare me thus my interest in the
                      oil filled versions.

                      So,how did those beams you were building come out for you ?
                      Pictures/story behind them perhaps :-)

                      All the best!

                      Sincerely,

                      Peter Lenihan,eternally jealous of those folks living in mild gentle
                      climates......RATS!......from along the shores of you know where :-)








                      Bolger rules!!!
                      - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                      - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                      - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                      - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                      - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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