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fiberglass roller/matt vs brush/cloth

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  • bill shamblin
    as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip. no doubt most builders are way beyond such floundering. i d become frustrated with covering wood
    Message 1 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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      as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip. no doubt most builders are way beyond such floundering.

      i'd become frustrated with covering wood with fiberglass using the brush and cloth method because of bubbles and wrinkles.. last week we built canoe sponsons under direction of an old boatshop owner who showed how to use a 4" roller on 8ish inch pieces of torn mat "with no square/straight edges". roll the wood. roll down one circle, half cover it with another circle and roll that down and so on............. more liquid if you see fibers. no bubbles.

      i am reinspired to build and cover.

      bill shamblin




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    • Bruce Hallman
      ... Good tip. = My favorite fiberglassing tip, (learned from Rick Bedard s posts) is to apply the epoxy to the cloth in two steps The first step is to just
      Message 2 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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        > pass on this tip

        Good tip.

        =

        My favorite fiberglassing tip, (learned from Rick Bedard's posts) is
        to apply the epoxy to the cloth in two steps

        The first step is to just glue the cloth to the wood spreading the
        epoxy on dry cloth using a wide drywall taping knife.

        The second step, only after the first epoxy starts getting hard, go
        back and fill the weave of the cloth with more resin, again using a
        wide drywall taping knife.

        Trying to fill the weave on the first pass is only trouble.
      • Stefan Probst
        Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so use once, discard is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly impossible. I will have to think about
        Message 3 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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          Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so "use once, discard"
          is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly impossible. I will
          have to think about some kind of self-made hard rollers.

          I have another question:
          The epoxy that I get here is quite thick. Using a brush I needed
          nearly 200 gr. (nearly a half lb) for a quarter sheet (i.e. 8 square
          feet).

          When working on interior surfaces, my main goal is best possible
          encapsulation and some scratch resistance. Should I use a squeegee
          instead of a brush to thin the layers, or could I use a brush, but
          then put only one thick layer on?

          Thanks,
          Stefan
        • Nels
          ... I use mostly a 4 roller and cut 8 foam roller covers in half which I find are quite cheap. The epoxy you are using seems quite thick, so a trowell like
          Message 4 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Probst" <stefan.probst@o...> wrote:
            >
            > Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so "use once, discard"
            > is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly impossible. I will
            > have to think about some kind of self-made hard rollers.
            >
            I use mostly a 4" roller and cut 8" foam roller covers in half which I
            find are quite cheap. The epoxy you are using seems quite thick, so a
            trowell like Bruce mentions may be useful. The serrated kind that are
            used to spread adhesive perhaps? I have never used a brush and this is
            the first time I have heard of using one.

            Nels
          • Bruce Hallman
            ... I have tried a brush, a roller, a plastic squeege & a serrated trowel and didn t like any of them. By far my favorite is a wide drywall taping knife .
            Message 5 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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              > trowell like Bruce mentions may be useful. The serrated kind that are
              > used to spread adhesive perhaps?

              I have tried a brush, a roller, a plastic squeege & a serrated trowel
              and didn't like any of them.

              By far my favorite is a wide 'drywall taping knife'.

              http://media.popularmechanics.com/images/0205drywall8.jpg

              Mostly because it seems to use the least epoxy, and gives a smoother result.
            • Harry James
              I have personally never had a problem with bubbles or wrinkles laying down cloth. I lay dry, pour on resin and move it with a plastic squeegee. HJ
              Message 6 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                I have personally never had a problem with bubbles or wrinkles laying
                down cloth. I lay dry, pour on resin and move it with a plastic squeegee.

                HJ

                bill shamblin wrote:

                >as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip. no doubt most builders are way beyond such floundering.
                >
                >i'd become frustrated with covering wood with fiberglass using the brush and cloth method because of bubbles and wrinkles.. last week we built canoe sponsons under direction of an old boatshop owner who showed how to use a 4" roller on 8ish inch pieces of torn mat "with no square/straight edges". roll the wood. roll down one circle, half cover it with another circle and roll that down and so on............. more liquid if you see fibers. no bubbles.
                >
                >i am reinspired to build and cover.
                >
                >bill shamblin
                >
                >
                >
                >
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              • Paul Thober
                Most of the fiberglassing I have done has been in cooler temperatures - 60 degrees F. or so. Even low-viscosity resin was thick. Best results and economy of
                Message 7 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                  Most of the fiberglassing I have done has been in
                  cooler temperatures - 60 degrees F. or so. Even
                  low-viscosity resin was thick. Best results and
                  economy of epoxy was using a plastic squeegee. Easier
                  to avoid bubbles and voids.

                  Paul


                  --- Stefan Probst <stefan.probst@opticom.v-nam.net>
                  wrote:

                  > Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so
                  > "use once, discard"
                  > is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly
                  > impossible. I will
                  > have to think about some kind of self-made hard
                  > rollers.
                  >
                  > I have another question:
                  > The epoxy that I get here is quite thick. Using a
                  > brush I needed
                  > nearly 200 gr. (nearly a half lb) for a quarter
                  > sheet (i.e. 8 square
                  > feet).
                  >
                  > When working on interior surfaces, my main goal is
                  > best possible
                  > encapsulation and some scratch resistance. Should I
                  > use a squeegee
                  > instead of a brush to thin the layers, or could I
                  > use a brush, but
                  > then put only one thick layer on?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > Stefan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >





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                • Roger Derby
                  Eight ounces (half a pound) for 32 square feet for the first coat on soft wood plywood is exactly what System Three suggests for estimating requirements.
                  Message 8 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                    Eight ounces (half a pound) for 32 square feet for the first coat on soft
                    wood plywood is exactly what System Three suggests for estimating
                    requirements.

                    Off-line I've sent you a table I extracted from their data. Sorry about the
                    English units, we're not that Frenchified in Indiana.

                    Roger
                    derbyrm@...
                    http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Stefan Probst" <stefan.probst@opticom.v-nam.net>

                    > I have another question:
                    > The epoxy that I get here is quite thick. Using a brush I needed
                    > nearly 200 gr. (nearly a half lb) for a quarter sheet (i.e. 8 square
                    > feet).
                  • Philip Smith
                    A friend in the days of long ago had reuseable rollers. They were round doughnut-like pieces of nylon which were machined to a point. A series of them fitted
                    Message 9 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                      A friend in the days of long ago had reuseable
                      rollers. They were round doughnut-like pieces of nylon
                      which were machined to a point. A series of them
                      fitted over a mandral. The whole contraption was like
                      a small paint roller with ridges (the nylon
                      doughnuts.) It seemed to work well for impregnating
                      the mat and the cloth with resin.

                      I don't know if they are still avialable or where
                      you'd get them. Their chief charm was that they were
                      reuseable.

                      Phil Smith
                    • Nels
                      ... squeegee. ... Does this work OK on sloped or rounded surfaces - like cedar stripped canoes for example? This is where I find the roller to work best for
                      Message 10 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@p...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I have personally never had a problem with bubbles or wrinkles laying
                        > down cloth. I lay dry, pour on resin and move it with a plastic
                        squeegee.
                        >
                        > HJ
                        >
                        Does this work OK on sloped or rounded surfaces - like cedar stripped
                        canoes for example? This is where I find the roller to work best for
                        me - rolling on the resin like paint and rolling out any runs. Also I
                        use very light glass and have no experience with roving or mat. Some
                        experience with kevlar,

                        Nels
                      • Ron Butterfield
                        ... When I built my canoe, this is exactly the method I used. I started from the center and worked the epoxy down toward the edge. I found that if I was a bit
                        Message 11 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                          At 03:32 PM 10/28/05, you wrote:
                          >--- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@p...> wrote:
                          > > I have personally never had a problem with bubbles or wrinkles laying
                          > > down cloth. I lay dry, pour on resin and move it with a plastic squeegee.
                          > >
                          >Does this work OK on sloped or rounded surfaces - like cedar stripped
                          >canoes for example?

                          When I built my canoe, this is exactly the method I used. I started
                          from the center and worked the epoxy down toward the edge. I found
                          that if I was a bit too aggressive with the scraping action I worked
                          microscopic air bubbles into the epoxy, giving a cloudy effect.


                          Regards,
                          RonB
                        • Jamie Orr
                          I ll chime in with a vote for the plastic squeegee. I find I have more control over the resin, and can do the job with less resin than with a roller. The
                          Message 12 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                            I'll chime in with a vote for the plastic squeegee. I find I have more
                            control over the resin, and can do the job with less resin than with a
                            roller. The squeegee also doesn't leave tiny bits of foam in the
                            resin. This works just fine on any surface, but is especially useful
                            on vertical surfaces like the sides of the canoe. The thin coating
                            doesn't drool and sag -- it needs an additional coat or two, but
                            there's far less sanding and a lighter boat in the end.

                            I've always used cloth almost (always 6 oz) to cover cedar strips or
                            plywood. My understanding is that mat is best used between layers of
                            heavier cloth or roving to fill the air spaces -- this would be for an
                            all glass hull I expect. I've also read that mat, and some cloth, has
                            a coating on it to hold it together until it is covered with polyester
                            resin (known in some hardware stores as fibreglass resin). The styrene
                            (I think) in the polyester dissolves this coating and then resin bonds
                            well to the mat, but epoxy doesn't contain this, so the mat's coating
                            doesn't dissolve so the bond is not as good.

                            Jamie Orr


                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@p...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > I have personally never had a problem with bubbles or wrinkles
                            laying
                            > > down cloth. I lay dry, pour on resin and move it with a plastic
                            > squeegee.
                            > >
                            > > HJ
                            > >
                            > Does this work OK on sloped or rounded surfaces - like cedar stripped
                            > canoes for example? This is where I find the roller to work best for
                            > me - rolling on the resin like paint and rolling out any runs. Also I
                            > use very light glass and have no experience with roving or mat. Some
                            > experience with kevlar,
                            >
                            > Nels
                            >
                          • William Page
                            bill shamblin wrote: as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip. last week we built canoe sponsons under direction of
                            Message 13 of 21 , Oct 28, 2005
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                              bill shamblin <bshamblin2002@...> wrote:
                              as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip.



                              last week we built canoe sponsons under direction of an old boatshop owner who showed how to use a 4" roller on 8ish inch pieces of torn mat "with no square/straight edges". roll the wood. roll down one circle, half cover it with another circle and roll that down and so on

                              I'm certainly no expert, but I have some experience:



                              1) I've never used mat, and no design I've built or contemplated building has specified its use. It is used in fiberglass boat construction to provide a smooth layer between the gel coat on a female mold and the cloth lay-ups that follow. It might work fine in a coating application, but I'd be dubious about substituting it for cloth in any structural capacity and I'm sceptical about the supposed virtues of "encapsulating" wood in epoxy;



                              2) When I covered a strip canoe, I was able to cover the exterior from gunwale to gunwale with a single piece of cloth, set at an angle, so that the cloth was "on the bias" - i.e. the warp and woof ran at an angle to the axis of the boat. This was a tip I picked from the Minnesota Canoe Assn.'s excellent guide to building strippers. The cloth is stretchiest at a 45 degree angle to the threads. The width of the cloth available made it necessary to use a much smaller angle, but it was adequate to get the cloth to conform easily to the curved shape. (I've forgotten how I glassed the interior - its been a long time!);



                              3) I think that it is important to avoid distorting the weave of the cloth before wetting out. I find it very useful when laying out cloth to roll the cloth around a suitable roller, then unroll over the piece to be laminated. I used a discarded piece of 2" PVC pipe on my latest project, but anything round will do.



                              4) If I manage to get the cloth laid out smoothly, I've rarely had problems with bubbles or wrinkles. Just start at the center and work progressively outward toward the edges, displacing the weave of the cloth as little as possible/necessary.



                              5) dry v. wet - It is easier to smooth cloth over a dry, smoothly sanded surface than one that has been wetted with epoxy. However, there is a body of opinion that holds that this can leave the cloth starved for resin at the wood-glass interface. I've been a sceptic about this, noting that the penetration of the West epoxy I use into the wood is very limited and the cloth would seem to hold an adequate reservoir of resin to ensure no starvation (at least if the piece is horizontal, and the cloth on the "up" side). However, I recently had an experience that gave me second thoughts, so I've reverted to the "wet-surface" lay-up technique. The insidious thing about starvation at the wood-cloth interface is that it can be invisible unless you start sanding through the glass - a form of destructive and self-defeating testing that no one is going to do intentionally;



                              6) brushes v. rollers v. squeegees: I've always used disposable brushes to wet out cloth. Rollers consisting of spaced washers are available from any number sources for this purpose. I've never tried them, although I think I have a small one on hand somewhere. The idea, I infer, is to apply a lot of pressure to the cloth. This is probably more important were several layers of cloth are being laid up, as in conventional fiberglass construction, than when laying a single layer on a wood structure. I've never used any kind of squeegee to wet out cloth - I'd be worried about dragging and distorting the cloth, other folks have reported good results, so it may just be a matter of correct technique. I have used small plastic squeegees to fill the weave on the second coating, with mixed results, on my current project. But I'm still learning.

                              Ciao for Niao,

                              Bill in MN




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                            • Ron Butterfield
                              ... A detail about this that I remember from Gilespie s book on strip canoes is that, if you don t prime the wood with epoxy first, the amount of epoxy held
                              Message 14 of 21 , Oct 29, 2005
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                                At 09:22 PM 10/28/05, William wrote:

                                >5) dry v. wet - It is easier to smooth cloth over a dry, smoothly sanded
                                >surface than one that has been wetted with epoxy. However, there is a body
                                >of opinion that holds that this can leave the cloth starved for resin at
                                >the wood-glass interface.

                                A detail about this that I remember from Gilespie's book on strip canoes is
                                that, if you don't "prime" the wood with epoxy first, the amount of epoxy
                                held by the cloth will be insufficient to provide proper penetration into
                                the wood.

                                If you put a coat of epoxy on the bare wood, then put the cloth on that and
                                squeegee the excess epoxy out, that problem does not appear.

                                It is one more step, though.

                                Regards,
                                RonB (the one in NC)
                              • Ron Butterfield
                                ... I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the cloth, and that the cloth is applied after the first coat has at least dried.
                                Message 15 of 21 , Oct 29, 2005
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                                  At 09:49 PM 10/29/05, I wrote:

                                  >If you put a coat of epoxy on the bare wood, then put the cloth on that and
                                  >squeegee the excess epoxy out, that problem does not appear.

                                  I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the
                                  cloth, and that the cloth is applied after the first coat has at least dried.

                                  Regards,
                                  RonB (the one in NC)
                                • William Page
                                  Ron Butterfield wrote: I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the cloth, and that the cloth is applied
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Oct 30, 2005
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                                    Ron Butterfield <ronb_5@...> wrote:
                                    I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the
                                    cloth, and that the cloth is applied after the first coat has at least dried.
                                    Bill sez:



                                    There is a body of thought out there that a cured coat of epoxy leaves an "amine blush" on it surface that impedes bonding to the second coat. More alarmingly, it is claimed that this "amine blush" can only be removed with water (assisted by a Scotch-Brite pad, or equivalent), not by sanding ("just grinds the amines into the surface"). Depending upon confirguation of pieces, working schedule, etc., washing a component in water is not always a very attractive option!



                                    I've tried the technique of applying cloth over a cured coat of epoxy a couple of times on a few small parts and encountered difficulty. The cured first coats were "snaggy" and caused the cloth to stretch were I didn't want it to stretch. The jokes about a "board stretcher" will be familiar to any novice who cut a board to short and presented to a carpenter. Perhaps workers with fiberglass have jokes about the "cloth shrinker".



                                    Ciao for Niao,

                                    Bill in MN
                                    Bolger rules!!!
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                                  • Clyde Wisner
                                    I ve never experienced this amine blush with Sys Three and I ve used a fair amount of it, some so old that I had to warm the resin in a microwave to break up
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Oct 31, 2005
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                                      I've never experienced this amine blush with Sys Three and I've used a
                                      fair amount of it, some so old that I had to warm the resin in a
                                      microwave to break up or disolve white crystal like masses.(if you do
                                      this, let it cool before using, it will kick off very quickly if the
                                      resin is hot or even warm when you mix hardener) Clyde

                                      William Page wrote:

                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Ron Butterfield <ronb_5@...> wrote:
                                      > I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the
                                      > cloth, and that the cloth is applied after the first coat has at least
                                      > dried.
                                      > Bill sez:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > There is a body of thought out there that a cured coat of epoxy leaves
                                      > an "amine blush" on it surface that impedes bonding to the second
                                      > coat. More alarmingly, it is claimed that this "amine blush" can only
                                      > be removed with water (assisted by a Scotch-Brite pad, or equivalent),
                                      > not by sanding ("just grinds the amines into the surface"). Depending
                                      > upon confirguation of pieces, working schedule, etc., washing a
                                      > component in water is not always a very attractive option!
                                      >
                                      > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                                      > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      >



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                                    • Harry James
                                      Most all epoxy resins will crystalise like old honey. Instead of the microwave I would suggest a hot water bath. HJ
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Oct 31, 2005
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                                        Most all epoxy resins will crystalise like old honey. Instead of the
                                        microwave I would suggest a hot water bath.

                                        HJ

                                        Clyde Wisner wrote:

                                        >I've never experienced this amine blush with Sys Three and I've used a
                                        >fair amount of it, some so old that I had to warm the resin in a
                                        >microwave to break up or disolve white crystal like masses.(if you do
                                        >this, let it cool before using, it will kick off very quickly if the
                                        >resin is hot or even warm when you mix hardener) Clyde
                                        >
                                        >William Page wrote:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >>Ron Butterfield <ronb_5@...> wrote:
                                        >>I should have clarified that you also put a coat of epoxy on top of the
                                        >>cloth, and that the cloth is applied after the first coat has at least
                                        >>dried.
                                        >>Bill sez:
                                        >>
                                        >>
                                        >>
                                        >>There is a body of thought out there that a cured coat of epoxy leaves
                                        >>an "amine blush" on it surface that impedes bonding to the second
                                        >>coat. More alarmingly, it is claimed that this "amine blush" can only
                                        >>be removed with water (assisted by a Scotch-Brite pad, or equivalent),
                                        >>not by sanding ("just grinds the amines into the surface"). Depending
                                        >>upon confirguation of pieces, working schedule, etc., washing a
                                        >>component in water is not always a very attractive option!
                                        >>
                                        >> * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                                        >> Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                                        >>
                                        >>
                                        >>------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        >>
                                        >>
                                        >>
                                      • chaemeocyparis
                                        Yet another voice . . . I m new to the group and am building a Birdwatcher II. It is said you only learn by making mistakes, so I must know something. I ve
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Oct 31, 2005
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                                          Yet another voice . . . I'm new to the group and am building a Birdwatcher II.
                                          It is said you only learn by making mistakes, so I must know something. I've sure made
                                          lots of mistakes. Even with System 3, cold temps mean amine formation -- I've had a
                                          visible oily film at worst. No real harm however, just clean it up.
                                          Forget matt, use cloth. Matt contains styrenes which dissolve in polyestyer but not in
                                          epoxies.
                                          Epoxy over new wood may bubble if the temperature rises. Trap the bubbles under the
                                          cloth and they are there to stay -- foolproof method is to coat today, use a cabinet
                                          scraper early tomorrow to get a smooth snagfree surface and smooth the cloth with your
                                          hands before putting resin into it. Cabinet scrapers cut off the surface where the amines
                                          form, without smearing them onto clean areas the way sandpaper does. You'll be able to
                                          use the cabinet scraper on resin way, way too 'green' to sand.
                                          If the surface is cool / cold, scrapers and even brushes will stretch the weave because the
                                          epoxy becomes viscous as it hits the cool surface. My solution is to use a thick dowel and
                                          roll it across the surface with my double-gloved hand like a rolling pin. No handle,
                                          nothing fancy. On a curved surface, substitute a short piece of thick-walled clear plastic
                                          hose for the dowel.
                                          I loused up one big job by using a scraper to spread in cool conditions. The stretched
                                          cloth crept back before the resin cured and left wrinkles -- and there's no solution for that
                                          except to wait for a complete cure and get out the angle grinder. Aaarrghh!!!
                                          However, a 'rolling pin' moves the resin with pure pressure and no side forces on the
                                          cloth.
                                          While the cloth surface is still green, fill the weave with a plastic drywall mud scraper
                                          about 4in wide. A surface destined for paint can be filled with silica/ resin mayonnaise,
                                          followed by cabinet scraper the next morning while it's still green. Again, the cabinet
                                          scraper doesn't scratch, it cuts so you scrape from both sides at 45degrees to get a real
                                          smooth surface.
                                          If you want to finish yr boat bright, its a little more tricky. Mix some resin with only part
                                          of the hardener and let it kick off. Then re-mix with the rest of the required dose of
                                          hardener to make yr mayo that way. Better experiment with whatever resin you use -- It
                                          works a treat with System 3 but I haven't tried other brands. (The 2:1 proportions are
                                          much easier to measure than 5:1 brands, even in very small quantities -- and I use a
                                          whole lot of small lots.)
                                          I hate wasting resin. When I turned the hull over, I left the weave showing on the sides.
                                          Now when I have leftover mayo from glue-ing, I trowel it into another patch of hull.
                                          Washing to remove amines at this stage caused me no trouble at all. (This hint will be
                                          absolutely no bloody use at all to people who are going to finish bright -- the silica makes
                                          the surface milky.)
                                          The Birdwatcher's slap mat under the bow needs a good bit of fairing work. Try one of
                                          those notched spreaders used for linoleum glue -- when the resin cures, use a coarse grit
                                          longboard to cut off the top of the ridges and then fill the valleys. Very quick!
                                          Last idea. Clean up with methyl hydrate instead of acetone -- it's cheaper, purer and it
                                          doesn't make you feel sick.

                                          Eric O'Higgins, in the Queen Charlotte Islands.

                                          >
                                          > bill shamblin <bshamblin2002@y...> wrote:
                                          > as a fibreglassing beginner im excited to pass on this tip.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > last week we built canoe sponsons under direction of an old boatshop owner who
                                          showed how to use a 4" roller on 8ish inch pieces of torn mat "with no square/straight
                                          edges". roll the wood. roll down one circle, half cover it with another circle and roll that
                                          down and so on
                                          >
                                          > I'm certainly no expert, but I have some experience:
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > 1) I've never used mat, and no design I've built or contemplated building has specified
                                          its use. It is used in fiberglass boat construction to provide a smooth layer between the gel
                                          coat on a female mold and the cloth lay-ups that follow. It might work fine in a coating
                                          application, but I'd be dubious about substituting it for cloth in any structural capacity and
                                          I'm sceptical > bill shamblin <bshamblin2002@y...>
                                        • Gene T.
                                          Stefan, Drop the rollers in vinegar when you are done with them. It breaks down the liquid Epoxy and makes cleaning easy. We are talking about the metal
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Nov 3, 2005
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                                            Stefan,
                                            Drop the rollers in vinegar when you are done with
                                            them. It breaks down the liquid Epoxy and makes
                                            cleaning easy. We are talking about the metal ridged
                                            rollers aren't we?

                                            Gene T.

                                            --- Stefan Probst <stefan.probst@opticom.v-nam.net>
                                            wrote:

                                            > Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so
                                            > "use once, discard"
                                            > is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly
                                            > impossible. I will
                                            > have to think about some kind of self-made hard
                                            > rollers.
                                            >
                                            > I have another question:
                                            > The epoxy that I get here is quite thick. Using a
                                            > brush I needed
                                            > nearly 200 gr. (nearly a half lb) for a quarter
                                            > sheet (i.e. 8 square
                                            > feet).
                                            >
                                            > When working on interior surfaces, my main goal is
                                            > best possible
                                            > encapsulation and some scratch resistance. Should I
                                            > use a squeegee
                                            > instead of a brush to thin the layers, or could I
                                            > use a brush, but
                                            > then put only one thick layer on?
                                            >
                                            > Thanks,
                                            > Stefan
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
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                                          • Stefan Probst
                                            ... The vinegar tip was one of the main reasons that I got my aversion against epoxy fillets down to a manageable level. ;) If I put the
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Nov 4, 2005
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                                              --- "Gene T." <goldranger02-boats@y...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Stefan,
                                              > Drop the rollers in vinegar when you are done with
                                              > them.

                                              The vinegar tip was one of the main reasons that I got my aversion
                                              against epoxy fillets down to a manageable level. ;)
                                              If I put the scraper/spatula/palette knife into the vinegar, most of
                                              the epoxy actually dissolves. A small amount (at the edge) might get
                                              hard, but that can be scraped off fairly easily.


                                              > It breaks down the liquid Epoxy and makes
                                              > cleaning easy. We are talking about the metal ridged
                                              > rollers aren't we?

                                              No. About the soft ones, like used for painting.

                                              The hard ones I was thinking about would be something that uses parts
                                              of PVC pipes....

                                              Stefan

                                              >
                                              > Gene T.
                                              >
                                              > --- Stefan Probst <stefan.probst@o...>
                                              > wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > Well, those rollers are quite expensive here, so
                                              > > "use once, discard"
                                              > > is no option for me. And cleaning them seems fairly
                                              > > impossible. I will
                                              > > have to think about some kind of self-made hard
                                              > > rollers.
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