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Humpback whales and Vindication

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  • Roger Derby
    This month s Flying magazine has a short article citing the work of researchers at West Chester University, Duke University, and the U.S. Naval academy as
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2005
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      This month's Flying magazine has a short article citing the work of
      researchers at West Chester University, Duke University, and the U.S. Naval
      academy as reported in the journal, Physics of Fluids.

      It seems the humpback whale has really ugly flippers. The leading edge
      looks like a very badly sharpened bread knife (major scallops of irregular
      sizes). Wind tunnel tests found it to have 8 percent more lift and 34
      percent less drag than a flipper with a smooth leading edge. It also
      stalled at a 40 percent steeper angle.

      My rough construction now has a scientific alibi. I'm going to have to make
      the leading edge of the centerboard even more uneven.

      Roger
      derbyrm@...
      http://home.earthlink.net/~derbyrm
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "David Ryan" <david@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 5:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Amherst Galley



      On Sep 1, 2005, at 12:02 PM, Bruce Hallman wrote:

      >
      > With shop grade plywood, and an airpowered stapler,
      > [and no fiberglass sheathing]...

      Part of what I said to Phil and Suzanne was that I wanted something
      fast enough and cheap enough to build that I would feel I'd thrown my
      money away by using the cheapest materials and quickest methods
      available - little camper for next Summer on Gardner's Bay.

      However, since our trip to CBI, I've seen the potential for a well-made
      Amherst Galley to make our next trip up there truly spectacular. A
      cheaply build one would be fun too, just not as much.

      > Please refresh my memory of more precisely what
      > an Amherst Galley is? Scans or photos, and/or written
      > description?

      The Galley is an oversized Birdwatcher with a schooner rig. Her name is
      derived from the school who commissioned the design (The Amherst Public
      School in Canada) and the eight row positions (to be manned by
      energetic adolescents) that provide her auxiliary power. (She's meant
      to accommodate six on overnight trips.) In many respects she's a
      smaller, plywood, centerboard version of the schooner rigged
      Berengaria.

      YIBB,

      David




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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    • Alvan A. Eames
      Roger, I have long thought that the shark is one of the fastest movers in the sea, and its skin is very rough, so why do our boats have to have a surface like
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2005
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        Roger,

        I have long thought that the shark is one of the fastest movers in the sea,
        and its skin is very rough, so why do our boats have to have a surface like
        a piano top?

        I seem to remember an article in Yachting Monthly some 40 years ago, which
        reckoned that a matt paint finish on a hull made for a faster boat than one
        done out with gloss paint.

        Alvan.
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