Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Commonsense Skiff

Expand Messages
  • graeme19121984
    Actually, is the Jinny hull a slightly bigger June Bug , or a re- worked Cold Water Sailboard (Chapter 5 FS)? I ve thought about camper mods to CWS .
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Actually, is the "Jinny" hull a slightly bigger "June Bug", or a re-
      worked "Cold Water Sailboard" (Chapter 5 FS)?

      I've thought about camper mods to "CWS".

      cheers
      graeme


      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "graeme19121984" <graeme19121984@y...>
      wrote:
      > Hi Gary, I just realised from here: (see pp 3 & 9)
      >
      > http://www.boatdesign.com/postings/Files/instbb/ib9.pdf
      >
      > that "Jinni" is a plumb-sided squareboat. Slightly bigger than "June
      > Bug" eh? Pretty. Fast.
    • Chris Lasdauskas
      ... Gary, I forget the details, but a few years ago I sat down and worked out the weight for Gypsy built out of various types of Ply and alternatively from
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        gbship wrote:

        > Graeme:
        >
        > Thanks. Found them. That beach cruiser is interesting. I'm looking
        > for womething that can be built of foam/epoxy/glass instead of
        > ply/glass for an ultra-light boat, hopefully in the 70-80 pound
        > range. Candidates are these two boats, Michalak's Woodbo, and maybe
        > Gypsy, with some modifications (I want a reefing sail and room to
        > sleep on board under a boom tent. Not sure the Beach Cruiser could be
        > done light enough, but it sure is a seductive design.
        >
        > Gary


        Gary,
        I forget the details, but a few years ago I sat down and worked out the
        weight for Gypsy built out of various types of Ply and alternatively
        from glassed foam. The foam was heavier than at least the lightest
        (possibly all) ply variation.

        I vaguely recall the issue was getting reasonable penetration protection.

        Chris
      • gbship
        Graeme, I m not sure Jimmi would row as well as the others, although it would be a possibility. It would be a better bet if two of us do this competition
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 2, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Graeme, I'm not sure Jimmi would row as well as the others, although it
          would be a possibility. It would be a better bet if two of us do this
          competition instead of me doing it solo. I would tend to think a multi-
          chine like Gypsy or Woodbo would be better, or if it's a sharpie hull,
          it would have to be faily narrow for its length, like the Beach Cruiser.

          Chris: How do you figure scantlings for foam/glass construction? I've
          done some online looking, but haven't found any resources. A friend
          laminated a couple layers of glass on either side of 3/8 inch foam (I
          think that was the thickness) and you could whack it with a hammer
          without damage and it was considerably lighter than a ply sandwich
          would have been. I made some hatches for our Frolic2 of glass over 1/4-
          inch foam and those are reasonably strong, and very light, but not
          strong enough for use for a hull. I have no idea if I should use
          thicker foam, more glass, or both for suitable strength. For that
          matter, if the budget allows, it's possible I'll got to carbon
          fiber/foam, which should be even lighter, but again, I have no idea of
          the suitable scantlings....

          Gary
        • graeme19121984
          Gary, competition changes things. IIRC Tom F Jones in Low Resistance Boats wrote of a
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 2, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Gary, "competition" changes things. IIRC Tom F Jones in "Low
            Resistance Boats" wrote of a <100 lbs garvey he once designed for a
            week-or-so long beachcruising race in which boats (solo) had to
            carry all their necessaries, and be able to be beached well above
            high water by their crew without any assistance of any kind each
            night. I liked the idea of that little cute sneakbox style 3/4
            decked cruiser a lot, and swear I would have built one if Jones
            published plans. Its owner loved it and enjoyed lengthy cruises and
            messing about in it for many years. It was no racer though. A wiser
            Jones wrote that if he had to do it again for that type of
            competition he would design something minimumalist canoe like. The
            sailing was not quite as important a factor as lightness and rowing.

            How about an adjusted "Zephyr" for two? length/beam > 6/1. (with
            reduced scantlings? Anhinga at 23'5" has only 0.25" ply sides)

            graeme

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gbship" <gbship@c...> wrote:
            > Graeme, I'm not sure Jimmi would row as well as the others,
            although it
            > would be a possibility. It would be a better bet if two of us do
            this
            > competition instead of me doing it solo. I would tend to think a
            multi-
            > chine like Gypsy or Woodbo would be better, or if it's a sharpie
            hull,
            > it would have to be faily narrow for its length, like the Beach
            Cruiser.
            >
            > Chris: How do you figure scantlings for foam/glass construction?
            I've
            > done some online looking, but haven't found any resources. A
            friend
            > laminated a couple layers of glass on either side of 3/8 inch foam
            (I
            > think that was the thickness) and you could whack it with a hammer
            > without damage and it was considerably lighter than a ply sandwich
            > would have been. I made some hatches for our Frolic2 of glass over
            1/4-
            > inch foam and those are reasonably strong, and very light, but not
            > strong enough for use for a hull. I have no idea if I should use
            > thicker foam, more glass, or both for suitable strength. For that
            > matter, if the budget allows, it's possible I'll got to carbon
            > fiber/foam, which should be even lighter, but again, I have no
            idea of
            > the suitable scantlings....
            >
            > Gary
          • Howard Stephenson
            Gary, If you go to: http://boatdesign.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-6334 .. you will find useful guidance on foam/glass scantlings. Following the advice
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 2, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Gary,

              If you go to:

              http://boatdesign.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-6334

              .. you will find useful guidance on foam/glass scantlings. Following
              the advice there, you should be able to decide what your scantlings
              would need to be and then compare the calculated weight per unit area
              with that of a ply skin -- and compare the cost too!

              Howard

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gbship" <gbship@c...> wrote:> Chris:
              How do you figure scantlings for foam/glass construction? I've
              > done some online looking, but haven't found any resources.
            • Chris Lasdauskas
              ... Gary, as I said it was a few years back, so this may not be right, but I think I used The Elements of Boat Strength for Builders, Designers, and Owners
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 2, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                gbship wrote:
                >
                > Chris: How do you figure scantlings for foam/glass construction? I've
                > done some online looking, but haven't found any resources.

                Gary, as I said it was a few years back, so this may not be right, but I
                think I used "The Elements of Boat Strength for Builders, Designers, and
                Owners" by Dave Gerr (though that is copyright 2000, and I thought I did
                this in about 1999..., perhaps I used his "The Nature of Boats"), I
                think I also didn't find much online.

                > A friend
                > laminated a couple layers of glass on either side of 3/8 inch foam (I
                > think that was the thickness) and you could whack it with a hammer
                > without damage and it was considerably lighter than a ply sandwich
                > would have been.

                Which reminds me of this cautionary story from "The Nature of Boats":

                'A Warning About Being Thin-Skinned

                'A final word of warning is in order. When using these high-strength
                fibers and sandwich construction, the skin thickness required for
                overall —- remember overall -— structural strength can become almost
                unbelievably thin, even on quite large vessels. This works out well on
                paper, but what about hitting a floating log? A well-known designer
                related a story both amusing and worrisome. A local builder of large
                (90-foot, 27-meter) high-speed sportfishermen proudly showed him an
                all-Kevlar, foam-sandwich hull panel that he'd used in a couple of
                recent craft. The builder explained that his computer confirmed the
                very, very thin skins (on the inside and outside of the foam) were more
                than up to the job.

                'To demonstrate his point, the builder took a hammer and wacked at the
                sample panel mightily. With the hammer bouncing off harmlessly, he
                offered it confidently to the skeptical architect. Taking the hammer,
                the architect turned it claw-side down and -— with virtually no force at
                all -— drove it right through Kevlar, the foam, and out the other side.
                The builder's face turned white. He had a couple of boats out on the
                water with this layup. The moral -— there's always a moral -— is that
                the structural design of high-tech hulls is a complicated business.
                Before you dash off to build or have built one of these miracle hulls,
                make sure a good naval architect does a detailed structural analysis.'

                That's what I was talking about when I mentioned penetration strength.
                Sure a Gypsy isn't going to hit logs at 30 knots, but the scantlings
                will already be redeuced in proportion to the speed. You can't let the
                skins get too thin. 'Too thin' on foam is thinnner than 'too thin' on
                ply. Avoiding that was where the extra weight came from.

                Chris
              • gbship
                ... strength. ... the ... Thanks everyone for the thought and advice. I should have explained better the use for this boat. It s for an expedition type
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  >
                  > That's what I was talking about when I mentioned penetration
                  strength.
                  > Sure a Gypsy isn't going to hit logs at 30 knots, but the scantlings
                  > will already be redeuced in proportion to the speed. You can't let
                  the
                  > skins get too thin. 'Too thin' on foam is thinnner than 'too thin' on
                  > ply. Avoiding that was where the extra weight came from.
                  >
                  > Chris

                  Thanks everyone for the thought and advice. I should have explained
                  better the use for this boat. It's for an expedition type competition
                  of around 1,000 miles, give or take, for kayaks and small sailboats.
                  Among the salient features, are you must beach launch your craft (You
                  can use mechanical assistance, but you must carry whatever you use for
                  the entire race), the ability to go under a 9-foot high bridge with 10-
                  foot horizontal clearance, deal with open water and inland waterways
                  churned by powerboat wakes, etc. This race is around the peninsula part
                  of Florida, so at one point, competitors have to go up the St. Mary's
                  river (in S. Georgia) and then portage their boats 40 MILES to the
                  Suwanee. The kayakers balance their boats on a set of wheels, attach
                  the bow to the back of their belt and walk it. They can also tow it
                  with a folding bike -- as long as they carry the bike for the entire
                  race. Obviously this won't work for sailboats, which even in a small
                  size weigh much more. So those comeptitors are allowed to switch to a
                  canoe for the necessary river portions and the portage. You can see the
                  details at Watertribe.com, check the Ultra Florida Challenge section.
                  We're only planning to do the shorter Everglades Challenge in 2006, in
                  our Frolic2, but I'm intrigued with trying the longer race in 2007. My
                  particular itch right now is to wonder if a small sailboat could be
                  built light enough so that switching to the canoe would be unnecessary,
                  even for the portage (which I would do with a bike!).

                  But, alas, I know almost nothing of composite construction, which is
                  why everyone's advice is so helpful and much appreciated. It does no
                  good to have an ultralight hull if it's punctured by a razor sharp
                  shell on an oyster bar, or a cypress knee or mangrove root in the
                  Everglades, or by a rock or log in the Suwanee. The weight concern is
                  why I've been mostly looking at ply instant-type boats in the 125 to
                  150 pound range and wondering if that weight could be cut in half with
                  composite construction. There are intriguing hints. For example, my 25-
                  30 pound solid wood mast on the Rolic2 could be replaced by a carbon
                  fiber spar that would weight less than 10 pounds. In Pete Goss' book
                  about single handed racing around the world, he mentions that the bare
                  hull of his 50 footer could be turned over by 6 husky guys --- about
                  what the 1/2 inch ply/fiberglass bare hull weighs on our 30-footer
                  (which is a Gypsy-type hull).

                  BTW Graeme, thanks for the suggestion of the Zephyr, but I ruled that
                  out because while it is an excellent daysailer and can handle some
                  nasty weather, it doesn't row very well, possibly because the 16-inch
                  sides are too high. (I had one for many years, and was very fond of it.)

                  Gary Blankenship
                • John B. Trussell
                  There have been various threads wich suggest that PCB doesn t design racing boats. You might take a look at Paul Gartside s web site--His Flashboat is a
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    There have been various threads wich suggest that PCB doesn't design
                    "racing" boats. You might take a look at Paul Gartside's web site--His
                    Flashboat is a very light, very fast row boat and he has camp cruised around
                    Alaska in it.

                    It appears to me that the rules you described favor a kayak with a sail.
                    I've always thought that a two person rowing boat would do well in this sort
                    of race--the two rowers could alternate and maintain speed more or less
                    continuously; they would also have the ability to row together and buck
                    currents if needed.

                    I'm way too old and decrepit to participate or even enjoy the kind of boat
                    needed for this kind of event, but iy si fun to think about.

                    John T
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "gbship" <gbship@...>
                    To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, July 03, 2005 7:57 AM
                    Subject: [bolger] Re: Commonsense Skiff


                    > >
                    > > That's what I was talking about when I mentioned penetration
                    > strength.
                    > > Sure a Gypsy isn't going to hit logs at 30 knots, but the scantlings
                    > > will already be redeuced in proportion to the speed. You can't let
                    > the
                    > > skins get too thin. 'Too thin' on foam is thinnner than 'too thin' on
                    > > ply. Avoiding that was where the extra weight came from.
                    > >
                    > > Chris
                    >
                    > Thanks everyone for the thought and advice. I should have explained
                    > better the use for this boat. It's for an expedition type competition
                    > of around 1,000 miles, give or take, for kayaks and small sailboats.
                    > Among the salient features, are you must beach launch your craft (You
                    > can use mechanical assistance, but you must carry whatever you use for
                    > the entire race), the ability to go under a 9-foot high bridge with 10-
                    > foot horizontal clearance, deal with open water and inland waterways
                    > churned by powerboat wakes, etc. This race is around the peninsula part
                    > of Florida, so at one point, competitors have to go up the St. Mary's
                    > river (in S. Georgia) and then portage their boats 40 MILES to the
                    > Suwanee. The kayakers balance their boats on a set of wheels, attach
                    > the bow to the back of their belt and walk it. They can also tow it
                    > with a folding bike -- as long as they carry the bike for the entire
                    > race. Obviously this won't work for sailboats, which even in a small
                    > size weigh much more. So those comeptitors are allowed to switch to a
                    > canoe for the necessary river portions and the portage. You can see the
                    > details at Watertribe.com, check the Ultra Florida Challenge section.
                    > We're only planning to do the shorter Everglades Challenge in 2006, in
                    > our Frolic2, but I'm intrigued with trying the longer race in 2007. My
                    > particular itch right now is to wonder if a small sailboat could be
                    > built light enough so that switching to the canoe would be unnecessary,
                    > even for the portage (which I would do with a bike!).
                    >
                    > But, alas, I know almost nothing of composite construction, which is
                    > why everyone's advice is so helpful and much appreciated. It does no
                    > good to have an ultralight hull if it's punctured by a razor sharp
                    > shell on an oyster bar, or a cypress knee or mangrove root in the
                    > Everglades, or by a rock or log in the Suwanee. The weight concern is
                    > why I've been mostly looking at ply instant-type boats in the 125 to
                    > 150 pound range and wondering if that weight could be cut in half with
                    > composite construction. There are intriguing hints. For example, my 25-
                    > 30 pound solid wood mast on the Rolic2 could be replaced by a carbon
                    > fiber spar that would weight less than 10 pounds. In Pete Goss' book
                    > about single handed racing around the world, he mentions that the bare
                    > hull of his 50 footer could be turned over by 6 husky guys --- about
                    > what the 1/2 inch ply/fiberglass bare hull weighs on our 30-footer
                    > (which is a Gypsy-type hull).
                    >
                    > BTW Graeme, thanks for the suggestion of the Zephyr, but I ruled that
                    > out because while it is an excellent daysailer and can handle some
                    > nasty weather, it doesn't row very well, possibly because the 16-inch
                    > sides are too high. (I had one for many years, and was very fond of it.)
                    >
                    > Gary Blankenship
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Bolger rules!!!
                    > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                    > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                    > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                    > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
                    (978) 282-1349
                    > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --
                    > No virus found in this incoming message.
                    > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                    > Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.6/33 - Release Date: 6/28/2005
                    >
                  • Gary Lepak
                    Gary, For what it s worth, I once built a Bolger Dolphin, (Small Boats, Design #259, 18 x 4 ) out of 3/8 Airex foam with two layers of 6 oz glass inside and
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Gary,

                      For what it's worth, I once built a Bolger Dolphin, (Small Boats, Design
                      #259, 18' x 4') out of 3/8" Airex foam with two layers of 6 oz glass inside
                      and out. It was a stripped down rowboat version, no centerboard, rudder or
                      rig. It weighed about a 100 lbs. I never weighed it, but two people could
                      throw it over their heads like a canoe. It seemed quite tough, and I never
                      worried about punctures or breakage. Of course it is a compound curved
                      hull so the bulding took some time with lofting and moldmaking, but you
                      would get a strong light hull this way. These days I would use Corefoam,
                      though it is expensive.

                      For a cheaper light boat that would be quicker to build I might try
                      lapstrake plywood. You could vary the plank thickness, say 4 to 5 mm on the
                      bottom and 3mm topsides.

                      Gary Lepak
                      Port Angeles, WA
                    • Howard Stephenson
                      To see a boat that is suitable for South Georgia, go to: http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Shackleton/South/057.jpg Howard ;-]
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        To see a boat that is suitable for South Georgia, go to:

                        http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Shackleton/South/057.jpg

                        Howard ;-]

                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gbship" <gbship@c...> wrote:

                        > so at one point, competitors have to go up the St. Mary's
                        > river (in S. Georgia) and then portage their boats 40 MILES
                      • graeme19121984
                        Perhaps *the* small boat team time trial endurance event.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Perhaps *the* small boat team time trial endurance event.

                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Howard Stephenson" <stephensonhw@a...>
                          wrote:
                          > To see a boat that is suitable for South Georgia, go to:
                          >
                          > http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Shackleton/South/057.jpg
                          >
                          > Howard ;-]
                          >
                          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gbship" <gbship@c...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > so at one point, competitors have to go up the St. Mary's
                          > > river (in S. Georgia) and then portage their boats 40 MILES
                        • James Greene
                          Wow, when I was thinking abut glass over foam construction I was considering 1 inch foam or thicker for the hulls. You guys are using foam that s less than
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Wow, when I was thinking abut glass over foam construction I was
                            considering 1 inch foam or thicker for the hulls. You guys are using
                            foam that's less than half this thickness! Interesting ...

                            James Greene


                            On Jul 3, 2005, at 09:58, gbship wrote:

                            > A friend
                            > laminated a couple layers of glass on either side of 3/8 inch foam (I
                            > think that was the thickness) and you could whack it with a hammer
                            > without damage and it was considerably lighter than a ply sandwich
                            > would have been. I made some hatches for our Frolic2 of glass over 1/4-
                            > inch foam and those are reasonably strong, and very light, but not
                            > strong enough for use for a hull.
                          • James Greene
                            ... I wonder if the cheapest available foam might not be good enough for most small boats, provided it fills the void between the inner and outer skins and
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jul 3, 2005
                            • 0 Attachment
                              > These days I would use Corefoam,
                              > though it is expensive.

                              I wonder if the cheapest available foam might not be "good enough" for
                              most small boats, provided it fills the void between the inner and
                              outer skins and does not separate from them. Does this leave out good
                              old fashioned styrofoam I wonder?

                              James Greene
                            • Clyde Wisner
                              I think I used inch and a half foam for my Brick and had to use a lot of glass and epoxy to get strength to stand in. I also made a deck of sorts from 1/4 ply
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jul 4, 2005
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I think I used inch and a half foam for my Brick and had to use a lot of
                                glass and epoxy to get strength to stand in. I also made a deck of sorts
                                from 1/4 ply so the sides wouldn't bolge out. Overall, not worth the
                                money in glass and epoxy, and the trouble. If you do go forward, I would
                                think a multi
                                chine rather than large flat areas like the bottom of a Brick. My foam
                                Brick floats upside down of course and almost floated away during
                                Isabell, which might not have been bad. Clyde.


                                James Greene wrote:

                                > > These days I would use Corefoam,
                                > > though it is expensive.
                                >
                                > I wonder if the cheapest available foam might not be "good enough" for
                                > most small boats, provided it fills the void between the inner and
                                > outer skins and does not separate from them. Does this leave out good
                                > old fashioned styrofoam I wonder?
                                >
                                > James Greene
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Bolger rules!!!
                                > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930,
                                > Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                                >
                                > * Visit your group "bolger
                                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger>" on the web.
                                >
                                > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                > bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                > <mailto:bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
                                >
                                > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                                > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                >



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Chris Stewart
                                ... the ... at ... side. Consider skin on frame constuction using 26 ounce double ply woven nylon skin. Quoting from UMIAK An Illustrated Guide by Skip
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jul 4, 2005
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Lasdauskas <cml@t...> wrote:
                                  > 'To demonstrate his point, the builder took a hammer and wacked at
                                  the
                                  > sample panel mightily. With the hammer bouncing off harmlessly, he
                                  > offered it confidently to the skeptical architect. Taking the hammer,
                                  > the architect turned it claw-side down and -— with virtually no force
                                  at
                                  > all -— drove it right through Kevlar, the foam, and out the other
                                  side.


                                  Consider skin on frame constuction using 26 ounce double ply woven
                                  nylon skin. Quoting from "UMIAK An Illustrated Guide" by Skip Snaith:
                                  "The 26-ounce double-weave nylon skin on Tim's boat was incredibly
                                  tough; you could hit it with the claw end of a hammer as hard as you
                                  liked, and the hammer would bounce back."

                                  Skin on frame can produce very light boats. Platt Monfort's Geodesic
                                  Aerolight boats are incredibly light, but probably not strong enough
                                  for the Watertribe Challenge. Up the scantlings a bit, with the frame
                                  lashed rather than glued to preserve flexibility, and use a much
                                  tougher skin and you'd end up with a light, resilient boat.

                                  Chris Stewart
                                • Gary Lepak
                                  James, The boatbuilding foams like Airex, Corecell and Divinicell are more dense than styrofoam. 5 to 8 lbs per cubic ft. compared to 1.1 (white) to 2 (pink
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jul 4, 2005
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    James,
                                    The boatbuilding foams like Airex, Corecell and Divinicell are more dense
                                    than styrofoam. 5 to 8 lbs per cubic ft. compared to 1.1 (white) to 2
                                    (pink or blue). The lighter the foam the thicker the skin needs to be to
                                    maintain the bond when struck. I've built two boats from blue foam, a tri
                                    that didn't last very long made of 1" thick foam with glass/epoxy skins,
                                    and a solid foam paddleboard I still have. The board has two layers of 6
                                    oz glass in epoxy resin on the bottom and a 3mm ply deck. The two layers of
                                    6 are about minimum I think, and it is still easily punctured or dented. It
                                    just doesn't matter much if it is, as it still floats, being solid foam. If
                                    you are always building boats with epoxy anyway, you fill the dings easily.
                                    The ply deck seems to take a lot of abuse without delaminating though, and
                                    could make a good boat with 1" foam inside 3mm ply with glass inside, but
                                    would probably weigh as much as 1/4" ply. I like using the blue foam though
                                    and still use it for things like outrigger floats or sponsons, i.e. solid
                                    foam objects with glass skin, rather than as a foam sandwich hull skin .
                                    Gary Lepak


                                    ----- Original Message ----- > I wonder if the cheapest available foam might
                                    not be "good enough" for
                                    > most small boats, provided it fills the void between the inner and
                                    > outer skins and does not separate from them. Does this leave out good
                                    > old fashioned styrofoam I wonder?
                                    >
                                    > James Greene
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.