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Re: Asking for advice,

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  • Howard Stephenson
    It s not easy to advise without knowing the dimensions -- length and width -- of the gaps, but you can fix up just about any mistake. If the gap is large, you
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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      It's not easy to advise without knowing the dimensions -- length and
      width -- of the gaps, but you can fix up just about any mistake. If the
      gap is large, you could stitch and glue an extra piece of plywood. If
      it's smaller, you could use fibreglass tape and epoxy resin, perhaps
      with some kind of temporary mould backing up the glass. The mould could
      be ply or even cardboard, covered in polythene film so the resin
      doesn't stick to it.

      As a rather poor carpenter, I'm speaking from experience.

      Howard

      ,--- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, catboat15@a... wrote:
      > What is a good way to fill some gaps between panels on one of Boger's
      tack and tape boats?
    • Bruce Hector
      3/4 gaps! That s great carpentry from my level of skill. And of course, it s well within epoxy range . Any gap that can be bridged with 6 inch fiberglass
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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        3/4" gaps!

        That's great carpentry from my level of skill. And of course, it's well
        within "epoxy range". Any gap that can be bridged with 6 inch
        fiberglass tape is within epoxy range.

        One several of my "boats" I've had pre bogging gaps I cpould lose my
        can of beer through!

        Get out the duct tape, lay it over the gap, and bog and glass it from
        the inside. Next day, take of the tape and do the same from the
        outside, heaping the epoxy/wood flour/whatever bonding filler you like
        up good in a mound. Later sand or grind down to the correct contour,
        or somewhere reasonably close et Voila, a nice strong seam. Stronger
        in fact than if you had a nice tight contact fit in the first place.

        Bruce Hector
        Full speed ahead Lenihan and pass the bloddy bog!
      • dnjost
        John - 3/4 ? not bad! Here is what I do when fixing small holes (up to 2 ) on Pointy Skiff, and with the gaps that occured when building Diablo. 1. duct
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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          John -

          3/4"? not bad! Here is what I do when fixing small holes (up to 2")
          on Pointy Skiff, and with the gaps that occured when building Diablo.

          1. duct tape a piece of heavy plastic over the outside joint to use
          as a release film. Be sure it is as fair as possible over the
          exterior chine area.

          2. Apply putty and a layer of glass to the inside of the hole. Smooth
          it out, as you are the one who is going to have to look at this side
          of the boat as a constant reminder of it.

          3. Remove the film from the outside and fill the uneven spots with
          putty

          4. sand until it looks fair to your eye.

          By "putty" I am referring to epoxy types. Please do not use bondo
          below the waterline or anywhere where it might get very wet. It will
          deteriorate with time and Murphy will have a say as to when it will
          fail. West makes various types of compounds. I like 407 for most work
          as it sands quite easily.


          David Jost
        • Peter Lenihan
          ... , it s well ... Been double dipping in that Maudit from your last visit,I see! I always thought epoxy was indeed noted for its gap filing properties but
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 4, 2005
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hector" <bruce_hector@h...>
            wrote:
            > 3/4" gaps!
            , it's well
            > within "epoxy range". Any gap that can be bridged with 6 inch
            > fiberglass tape is within epoxy range.
            > Bruce Hector
            > Full speed ahead Lenihan and pass the bloddy bog!

            Been double dipping in that Maudit from your last visit,I see! I
            always thought epoxy was indeed noted for its' gap filing properties
            but can't recall ever reading anything about gorges,fiords,canyons
            and raveens :-) If a"gap" is found to be bigger then the width of a
            common pencil(1/4"?), I would humbly suggest re-measuring and re-
            cutting a better fitting piece. If funds are tight or budget simply
            busted,then go ahead and "patch" or fill with more epoxy. Keep in
            mind however,epoxy is far more expensive then wood and is intended
            to be the glue that holds a structure together,not the other way
            around :-)

            Sincerely,

            Peter,"Le Gris",Lenihan, worried that BBB(Big Bad Bruce) has been
            chewing on the lees at the bottom of his Maudit bottles attempting
            to tweek his buzz upward.....:-D
          • donm172001
            A 3/4 gap is big enough to shim with wood. I would cut a piece of similar wood keeping the grain in the same direction as the original piece Try to match the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 6, 2005
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              A 3/4" gap is big enough to shim with wood. I would cut a piece of
              similar wood keeping the grain in the same direction as the original
              piece Try to match the angle and width, but if the angle is off a
              little or the piece is not quite as wide as the gap, don't worry
              about it. Clamp a support piece under the work area if necessary. Put
              plastic carton sealing tape on it if you don't want it to be part of
              the finished structure. Coat the edges to be mated with unthickened
              epoxy, wait a while for it to soak in, then coat the mating surfaces
              with thickened epoxy and slide in the filler piece. Most likely the
              epoxy in the joints will begin to sink after a while. If it does,use
              a small syringe filled with thickened epoxy and put a bead along each
              joint. Wipe the adjacent areas with acetone or vinegar before the
              epoxy cures to save on sanding later. When it is cured about
              fingernail hard, or a little less, remove the support. and scrape off
              any epoxy above the surfaces. You will end up with an almost
              invisible repair requiring little or no sanding.







              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hector" <bruce_hector@h...>
              wrote:
              > 3/4" gaps!
              >
              > That's great carpentry from my level of skill. And of course, it's
              well
              > within "epoxy range". Any gap that can be bridged with 6 inch
              > fiberglass tape is within epoxy range.
              >
              > One several of my "boats" I've had pre bogging gaps I cpould lose
              my
              > can of beer through!
              >
              > Get out the duct tape, lay it over the gap, and bog and glass it
              from
              > the inside. Next day, take of the tape and do the same from the
              > outside, heaping the epoxy/wood flour/whatever bonding filler you
              like
              > up good in a mound. Later sand or grind down to the correct
              contour,
              > or somewhere reasonably close et Voila, a nice strong seam.
              Stronger
              > in fact than if you had a nice tight contact fit in the first place.
              >
              > Bruce Hector
              > Full speed ahead Lenihan and pass the bloddy bog!
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