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Re: [bolger] Re: Capsize - Oil on the waters

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  • Ford and Mary Ann Walton
    John, You don t have to use petroleum oil, light vegetable or even fish oils will work, too. Putting oil in a cloth bag and dragging it behind a sailboat
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 7, 2005
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      John,

      You don't have to use petroleum oil, light vegetable or even fish oils
      will work, too. Putting oil in a cloth bag and dragging it behind a
      sailboat running before the seas is an old trick, but it still works.

      Ford Walton



      John Cupp wrote:
      >
      > I have sailed that area around the Golden Gate and commercial fished
      > from San Francisco for most of the years I was growing up. Before
      > environmentalism ( notice any type of PC behavior has Mental added
      > in) I was in the Sea Scouts at the Palo Alto Yacht Harbor down the
      > bay. We were shown how to beach a boat in relative safety in heavy
      > breaking surf. All you needed to do was carry some quart bottles of
      > 5 weight oil. While you were coming in, in an emergency you would
      > throw an open can ahead and behind you. Now they use bottles but
      > this was done in the 1960's It flattens out all the breaking waves
      > and you get none of the bubbling churning surf, reducing the wave
      > height in the process.
      >
      > It is apparent that the people on that boat were asleep at the helm
      > or doing things unmentionable on this forum or they would have seen
      > their desperate situation. Maybe they were just trying to get close
      > enough to take pictures with a camera without the use of a telephoto
      > lens. I think they were crazy in that area.. Out a little further
      > and to the north of that area is a place called the potato patch
      > shoals and they are the most dangerous waters next to the Columbia
      > Bar on the West coast of the US. Not to mention that every year
      > there are Great White Shark attacks at the very beach those pictures
      > were taken. Even inside the Gate there are shark attacks often. It
      > is an amazing set of pictures showing what not to do. In a
      > situation where you need to get on shore you come straight in and
      > not at any angle to the beach. If you have a keel boat you try to
      > ride the wave height in until you finally hit bottom but using an
      > anchor for the boat and riding in on a rubber boat would be ten
      > times better than what they did. Hind sight is always twenty,
      > twenty but risking your life calls for oil.
      >
      > I cannot in this day an age see using oil to go through a surf
      > washed beach without being attacked by the surfers themselves who
      > would be mad as hell you ruined their surfing. But remember my
      > advice it really can save your life and make beaching a calm event
      > even when big waves are causing lots of turbulence in the water. At
      > least four cans of oil might be needed and that should give you a
      > window of about fifteen minutes to get on shore. You can use as
      > high as twenty weight but that tends to pool up and not spread
      > across the water surface as well. Remember I learned this trick in
      > the Sea Scouts and I don't want to kill birds, otters or clams
      > just
      > save a few lives. So if you are faced with running an inlet with
      > huge breaking waves and your life is in the balance, try it! I have
      > seen it work very well.
      >
      > John Cupp
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "John B. Trussell"
      > <John.Trussell@w...> wrote:
      > > What a sad series of pictures. Happily no loss of life.
      > >
      > > The boat appears to be about 25 feet long with a fin keel. It was
      > overtaken by a breaking wave which appears to be about 15 feet
      > high. The result is an illustration of a wave induced broach--the
      > boat pitches forward; bow digs in; wave action lifts the stern and
      > the boat capsizes. Note that around picture 7 and 8 that the hull
      > has accelerated and the sails are aback.
      > >
      > > The hull self righted and appears to be floating on an even keel,
      > broadside to the waves. It is rolled again and, again it rights
      > itself, though subsequent pictures show it is down by the stern.
      > The cockpit is completely flooded and I would guess that the open
      > companionway allowed the cabin to flood as well. (perhaps the
      > rudder was torn off during the second capsize, opening up the back
      > of the hull?)
      > >
      > > As Bolger has written, no boat is immune to capsize; if you doubt
      > it, put a model boat in the surf at the beach or watch The Perfect
      > Storm. A boat can be designed to recover from a 180 degree capsize
      > (as this one did) and to be a corked bottle with a lot of bouyancy
      > (assuming the "corked bottle" doesn't break).
      > >
      > > Running with a large breaking wave is an invitation to disaster.
      > I would expect a Micro or a Micro Navigator would broach and capsize
      > under a 15 foot breaking wave. Assuming it held together and
      > assuming the hatches were closed and secured, I would expect it to
      > remain afloat, though it would almost certainly be dismasted.
      > >
      > > Stay away from breaking waves!
      > >
      > > John T
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Bruce Hallman
      > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Monday, April 04, 2005 11:03 AM
      > > Subject: [bolger] Capsize
      > >
      > >
      > > http://www.sfsurvey.com/photos/sail/index.htm
      > >
      > > Seeing these photos makes me contemplate
      > > just how my Micro Navigator would have reacted
      > > in this surf. I notice how the sinking was caused
      > > by water pouring into the cockpit and then the cabin,
      > > and the Micro Navigator doesn't have a cockpit.
      > >
      > > It also makes me more concious of sailing with
      > > the cabin hatch closed versus open.
      > >
      > > I also suspect that the force of the wave would
      > > have broken off the Micro Navigator masts.
      > >
      > > How would have the full length fin keel have changed
      > > the tendency of the hull to slew sideways under
      > > the force of the wave?
      > >
      > > Which Bolger boats would have survived a
      > > similar experience, and how?
      > >
      > >
      > > Bolger rules!!!
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      >
      > Bolger rules!!!
      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
      > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
      > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
      > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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