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[bolger] Re: Windspint construction update

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  • Teakdeck@aol.com
    Robert, I was out sailing in my Windsprint today, here in Olympia, Wa. The weather was beautiful, sun shining steady, gentle breeze. I knew I couldn t do the
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 3, 1999
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      Robert,

      I was out sailing in my Windsprint today, here in Olympia, Wa. The weather
      was beautiful, sun shining steady, gentle breeze.

      I knew I couldn't do the buttstraps by curling copper nails. I think I
      clamped them down somehow, then taped them afterwords.

      By the way, I used 1/2 inch ply for the bottom as was suggested by John Bell
      and I certainly appreciate that when my boat slaps in to oncoming chop.

      I made every mistake possible on my boat (which doesn't say much for my
      craftmanship, but my experience might be useful) so feel free to float out
      any test balloons before you do something.

      Mike Masten
      In a message dated 10/3/99 4:03:01 PM, rlundy@... writes:

      << Well, I finally got started Saturday on some of the bigger parts.

      Sawed out the sides (3 pieces per side). Spent a lot of time remebering
      inside and outside and making sure I got the right cuts made in the right
      direction for the two aftersides and forward sides.

      Then came the buttstapping. I had decided to do this just a Payson
      descibes, using Weldwood Glue and copper tacks. This was almost a disaster,
      as about twenty of the copper tacks bent the minute I touched them with the
      hammer! Boy are these things soft. But things got even worse when I turned
      over the sides and pried off the plywood backer board I was using. Out of
      an aver 10 tacks used per stap went all the way through and needed to be
      bent. I believe the others must have curled under after going through the
      buttstrap. On top of this the wax paper I stuck under the butted pieces
      stuck to the work. Anybody know how to get off little stuck pieces of wax
      paper? I guess I could sand it. How did this happen anyway? Payson always
      uses Wax paper.

      I ended up with two straps where the ends didn't get stuck down well. I
      flowed some PL Polyurethane into the crack and clamped the whole thing good.
      Seems to be doing OK. I dropped the sides a couple of time and put some
      bending pressure on them; nothing came apart. I'll put a layer of glass
      tape on the outside to make sure everything stays together.

      Here's what I think I learned:

      1. I only supported the sides directly under the buttstrap. This caused
      enough upward pressure on the strap that the copper nails wanted to bend
      with any bounce when my hammer hit. Next time the sides will be suported
      about every foot.

      2. The copper nails/Weldwood is probably pretty sturdy, but I thought of
      something I know would work. Polyurethane Glue (which you don't have to
      mix) and sheetrock screws drilled in to the backing would have made short
      work of this. You could back out the sheetrock screws when you're done,
      fill the holes and have not fasteners to worry about. As an added bonus,
      your not beating on any thing with a hammer that you're try to keep in
      alignment. I'm much more comfortable with a cordless drill and sheetrock
      screws than I am with a hammer.

      3. No more wax paper. I'll use polyethylene scaps next time.

      More updates as I really start screwing up.
      >>
    • monica@chairlady.com
      ... of wax ... always ... Happens very easily. Payson lives in Maine, where they have a peculair weather condition you Florida people don t know about. It gets
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 3, 1999
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        >
        > ...On top of this the wax paper I stuck under the butted pieces
        > stuck to the work. Anybody know how to get off little stuck pieces
        of wax
        > paper? I guess I could sand it. How did this happen anyway? Payson
        always
        > uses Wax paper.
        >

        Happens very easily. Payson lives in Maine, where they have a peculair
        weather condition you Florida people don't know about. It gets COLD
        there. It's been mentioned no one south of the Mason Dixon line should
        use the wax paper trick for epoxy. The kick-off temp of the epoxy in
        warmer climes is enough to melt the wax in the paper and give the epoxy
        a wonderful bond to the underlying paper. I had the same problem once
        in my New York apartment one hot summer day.

        If the temp is right, wax paper is just so convienent to use. Comes on
        rolls, convienent width, and comes with a cutter in the package. And
        cheap too! But any tough plastic sheet should work, just pick a thicker
        material so it can stand up to a squeegy running over it.
      • Michael Jennings
        Robert, I used 4 fiberglass tape with epoxy, covered by wax paper, spare plywood and then old barbell weights to butt joint the sides. I did one side of each
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 5, 1999
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          Robert, I used 4" fiberglass tape with epoxy, covered by wax paper,
          spare plywood and then old barbell weights to butt joint the sides. I
          did one side of each side piece at a time and supported them on a make
          ship table of a 1/2 sheet of ply supported on saw horses. The wax paper
          worked fine for me although I did spend what seemed like an eternity
          fairing all the joints inside and out. For the bottom I used 1/2" ply
          on the inside of the butt joint bonded with thickened epoxy. I held
          this together during curing with clamps and temporarily intalled drywall
          screws. This was much easier than the sides and at least eliminated the
          fairing on the inside. I would definately go this route in the future.

          Robert N. Lundy wrote:
          >
          > Well, I finally got started Saturday on some of the bigger parts.
          >
          > Sawed out the sides (3 pieces per side). Spent a lot of time remebering
          > inside and outside and making sure I got the right cuts made in the right
          > direction for the two aftersides and forward sides.
          >
          > Then came the buttstapping. I had decided to do this just a Payson
          > descibes, using Weldwood Glue and copper tacks. This was almost a disaster,
          > as about twenty of the copper tacks bent the minute I touched them with the
          > hammer! Boy are these things soft. But things got even worse when I turned
          > over the sides and pried off the plywood backer board I was using. Out of
          > an aver 10 tacks used per stap went all the way through and needed to be
          > bent. I believe the others must have curled under after going through the
          > buttstrap. On top of this the wax paper I stuck under the butted pieces
          > stuck to the work. Anybody know how to get off little stuck pieces of wax
          > paper? I guess I could sand it. How did this happen anyway? Payson always
          > uses Wax paper.
          >
          > I ended up with two straps where the ends didn't get stuck down well. I
          > flowed some PL Polyurethane into the crack and clamped the whole thing good.
          > Seems to be doing OK. I dropped the sides a couple of time and put some
          > bending pressure on them; nothing came apart. I'll put a layer of glass
          > tape on the outside to make sure everything stays together.
          >
          > Here's what I think I learned:
          >
          > 1. I only supported the sides directly under the buttstrap. This caused
          > enough upward pressure on the strap that the copper nails wanted to bend
          > with any bounce when my hammer hit. Next time the sides will be suported
          > about every foot.
          >
          > 2. The copper nails/Weldwood is probably pretty sturdy, but I thought of
          > something I know would work. Polyurethane Glue (which you don't have to
          > mix) and sheetrock screws drilled in to the backing would have made short
          > work of this. You could back out the sheetrock screws when you're done,
          > fill the holes and have not fasteners to worry about. As an added bonus,
          > your not beating on any thing with a hammer that you're try to keep in
          > alignment. I'm much more comfortable with a cordless drill and sheetrock
          > screws than I am with a hammer.
          >
          > 3. No more wax paper. I'll use polyethylene scaps next time.
          >
          > More updates as I really start screwing up.
          >
          > Robert & Amy Lundy
          > St. Petersburg, Fla
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
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