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Reply to query re: folding schooner news

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  • W & C White
    Pauldayau: I too miss folding schooner news. I bought the plans about 10 years ago, but didn t begin cutting wood until the middle of this summer. Among other
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2005
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      Pauldayau:

      I too miss folding schooner news. I bought the plans about 10 years
      ago, but didn't begin cutting wood until the middle of this summer.
      Among other things, I had to move to (inland) Florida, then put up a
      boatshop. Got all the plywood pieces cut (marine okoume ply) and
      stacked against one of the shop doors. Then came Charley the hurricane,
      who wrought havoc hereabouts, including blowing open three of the four
      doors of the shop just before he moved on north. The unblown one was
      the one with the schooner pieces leaning against it; they all survived,
      mirabile dictu, not even wetted. The plans, tacked to a wall, were
      wetted, and disintegrated. I bought another set from Dynamite.

      My only previous boatbuilding experience was in the '70s, when I joined
      a group of guys building a fleet of Windmills in Connecticut. Since as
      a kid I sliced my fingers several times trying to build balsa models, I
      was happy to find I was a late bloomer in woodworking skills. However,
      I had a whole group of experienced teacher then, and I'm on my own now,
      so I am taking it VERY slow. Since the hurricanes (three of them passed
      through) I have built a strongback, and experimented with various
      methods of shaving the bevels on the bulkheads and frames.

      Have been intrigued with various concepts on this site as to best
      method of fastening and gluing. Plan to experiment with the
      staples-and-strapping-tape method someone posted a few months ago,
      instead of the screw-every-three-inches called for by PB, since the
      consensus is that fasteners aren't needed once the epoxy has dried. I
      am a nut for performance, and experience tells me that a light boat
      goes faster than a heavy one, and fastest if it's good and stiff.

      I'm also considering a pair of square-head sail like those on
      windsurfers and Cup boats, for better performance AND the look of a
      topsail schooner, the prettiest sail rig in my opinion.

      Reactions?

      -- Will
    • pauldayau
      ... Lesson 1 photocopy your plans and work from a set you can doodle and spill coffee on ... The folding schooner doesnt need a strong back ay all . I built 1
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 3, 2005
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        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, W & C White <omegacubed@d...> wrote:
        > Pauldayau:
        >
        > I . The plans, tacked to a wall, were
        > wetted, and disintegrated. I bought another set from Dynamite.
        Lesson 1 photocopy your plans and work from a set you can doodle and
        spill coffee on
        >
        > ) I have built a strongback,
        The folding schooner doesnt need a strong back ay all . I built 1
        hull at a timme glued and screwed itthen screwed on some pine planks
        to keep it in plumb until the bottoms went on. when i finally joined
        the hulls I was out by 1.5mm over the 31'. .
        and experimented with various
        > methods of shaving the bevels on the bulkheads and frames.
        I extended the lines on the plans in pencil, set my adjustable bevel
        and drew the bevels onto the bulkheads. I had a freestanding frame of
        heavy timber that I clamped the frames to and a few strokes of a hand
        plane did the job.
        >
        > Have been intrigued with various concepts on this site as to best
        > method of fastening and gluing. Plan to experiment with the
        > staples-and-strapping-tape method someone posted a few months ago,
        > instead of the screw-every-three-inches called for by PB, since the
        > consensus is that fasteners aren't needed once the epoxy has dried.
        Bollocks to that ! screw ,screw, and screw.
        In this design the surface area of the glued joinnts is so small
        that the screws still hold it all together. When a joint cracks
        falling of a shitty power boat wake you will stop a crack at a screw.
        . I tried the no screw idea on a landyacht and had to go back and
        rebuild the hull. Our corregated dirt roads are enough to break pure
        epxoy joins.
        Last year my june bug fell off the trailer at 90kmph without
        damage . I blame the screws. I
        > am a nut for performance, and experience tells me that a light boat
        > goes faster than a heavy one, and fastest if it's good and stiff.
        >
        > I'm also considering a pair of square-head sail like those on
        > windsurfers and Cup boats, for better performance AND the look of a
        > topsail schooner, the prettiest sail rig in my opinion.
        the sails as drawn will get top speed out of the hull at all wind
        speed.. dont waste money on fancy sails when you could spend it a
        good traileror good wine.. Our only race in the schooner was
        cancelled due to no wind. In reality this meant that the other boats
        were unable to get any speed in the winds available . we never
        stopped in the race. and cut our last lap short because the other
        boats had motored or been towed home. WE SAILED.
        Our 5 hp O/B will push the boat at the sme speed as a 9.9. and i
        suspect your fancy sails will too. fancy sails will simply give a
        sail perfomance beyond the hulls ability. The idea of a flat top sail
        on such a small mast is to let it fall away to lessen the impact of
        gusts. ie immitating a Gaff rig. They also prefer a flexible mast
        rather then the rigid beasties on a schooner.if you stick to the
        plans you wiil stay in front.
        cheers paul Day. Australian tight arse boat builder of the month
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • craig o'donnell
        ... Why don t you actually use topsails? See my Cheap Pages (search on Conor O Brien --not Conan O Brien) for his setup for small boat topsails. -- Craig
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 3, 2005
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          >I'm also considering a pair of square-head sail like those on
          >windsurfers and Cup boats, for better performance AND the look of a
          >topsail schooner, the prettiest sail rig in my opinion.
          >
          >Reactions?

          Why don't you actually use topsails? See my Cheap Pages (search on Conor
          O'Brien --not Conan O'Brien) for his setup for small boat topsails.
          --
          Craig O'Donnell
          Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
          <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
          The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
          The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
          Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
          American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
          Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
          _________________________________

          -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
          -- Macintosh kinda guy
          Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
          _________________________________
        • Gene T.
          ... It is my understanding that the nails or screws also serve to hold the plywood layers together, not just the glue joint. This could stop failure by
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 5, 2005
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            > > instead of the screw-every-three-inches called for
            > by PB, since the
            > > consensus is that fasteners aren't needed once the
            > epoxy has dried.

            It is my understanding that the nails or screws also
            serve to hold the plywood layers together, not just
            the glue joint. This could stop failure by
            delamination. glue alone only attaches the plywood by
            the one layer that has the glue on it. The fiberglass
            tape around the joint can serve this same purpose.....
            Experimentation is good, security is better! And, if
            we are talking about the chine joints, the weight is
            where it needs to be!

            Gene T.
          • Gene T.
            ... Copying plans is a great idea, and lamination of a copy is even better but..... Working on my Single Handed Schooner copies turned up what I suspected,
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 5, 2005
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              --- pauldayau <wattleweedooseeds@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, W & C White
              > <omegacubed@d...> wrote:
              > > Pauldayau:
              > >
              > > I . The plans, tacked to a wall, were
              > > wetted, and disintegrated. I bought another set
              > from Dynamite.
              > Lesson 1 photocopy your plans and work from a set
              > you can doodle and
              > spill coffee on


              Copying plans is a great idea, and lamination of a
              copy is even better but..... Working on my Single
              Handed Schooner copies turned up what I suspected,
              Xerox copies are not guaranteed to be true to scale.
              There was a difference that would have effected part
              sizes. Or, why were all the dimensions such odd ball
              numbers?!? I think the original plans need to be kept
              handy for precise measurements....

              Gene T.
            • Bruce Hallman
              Heads up, these people just listed back issues of Small Boat Journal for sale, $2/ issue. Columbia Trading Co. One Barnstable Road , Hyannis, MA, U.S.A.,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 5, 2005
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                Heads up,
                these people just listed back issues of Small Boat Journal for sale, $2/ issue.

                Columbia Trading Co.
                One Barnstable Road , Hyannis, MA, U.S.A., 02601.
                <mailto:info@...>
                Ph: 508-778-2929 Fax: 508-778-2922
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