Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Weldwood vs. Titebond II?

Expand Messages
  • Garth Battista
    I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint). When it came time to glue on Toto s wales, I thought, OK, rather than gooping it up with the
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint).
      When it came time to glue on Toto's wales, I thought, OK, rather than
      gooping it up with the sure thing, epoxy, I'll finally try wood glue,
      as per Payson's book, and Michalak's instructions. No Weldwood to be
      found at our lumberyard, but they had this bottle of premixed
      Titebond II, quite inexpensive.
      It says it "outperforms all other wood glues." "Passes ANSI
      Type II water resistance testing." "Ideal for exterior uses" but
      "not recommended for use below the waterline or for continuous
      submersion." All sounds OK for wales, I guess. But how does it stack
      up against the most-mentioned wood glue, Weldwood? And what exactly
      are the ANSI Type II water resistance standards?

      Has anyone ever used both and formed an opinion as to which is best?
      The Titebond is a cinch to apply, with its applicator nozzle. But is
      it just a glorified Elmer's? Any advice appreciated.

      Looking forward to the next boat,
      Garth
    • Mark Paquette
      I used the Titebond II on a saw horse leg. (I was about a foot short and no other 2x4 s on hand) I used a butt joint with a 2x4 butt block and no fastners.
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        I used the Titebond II on a saw horse leg. (I was about a foot short
        and no other 2x4's on hand) I used a butt joint with a 2x4 butt block
        and no fastners. The joint has lasted 3 years being stored outside,
        unpainted.

        I am currently using this saw horse in the garage to hold up my 12'
        sailing skiff that I am waiting to paint (still to cold...).

        I would use it...

        Mark in MN.



        --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Garth Battista" <garth@b...> wrote:
        > I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint).
        > When it came time to glue on Toto's wales, I thought, OK, rather
        than
        > gooping it up with the sure thing, epoxy, I'll finally try wood
        glue,
        > as per Payson's book, and Michalak's instructions. No Weldwood to
        be
        > found at our lumberyard, but they had this bottle of premixed
        > Titebond II, quite inexpensive.
        > It says it "outperforms all other wood glues." "Passes ANSI
        > Type II water resistance testing." "Ideal for exterior uses" but
        > "not recommended for use below the waterline or for continuous
        > submersion." All sounds OK for wales, I guess. But how does it
        stack
        > up against the most-mentioned wood glue, Weldwood? And what exactly
        > are the ANSI Type II water resistance standards?
        >
        > Has anyone ever used both and formed an opinion as to which is
        best?
        > The Titebond is a cinch to apply, with its applicator nozzle. But
        is
        > it just a glorified Elmer's? Any advice appreciated.
        >
        > Looking forward to the next boat,
        > Garth
      • andy farquhar
        Garth I used Tirtebond II on the gunnels of a glued lapstrake sailing canoe that I built two years ago. I have sailed the boat frequently for the past two
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Garth

          I used Tirtebond II on the gunnels of a glued lapstrake sailing canoe
          that I built two years ago. I have sailed the boat frequently for
          the past two years and all is fine. Also, I glued the scarfs for the
          inwales and outwales with Titebond II (I am too cheap to spring for
          lumber that long) and they are holding up fine. I am now using
          Titebond II for most of the joining above the waterline in a Bolger
          Oldshoe which is now under (slow) construction.

          Andy Farquhar
          afarquhar@...
        • gbship@istal.com
          Titebond II has held well in a variety of uses on three different boats; from masts to rubrails. The only way I ve gotten it to fail is to boil or soak for a
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 5, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Titebond II has held well in a variety of uses on three different
            boats; from masts to rubrails. The only way I've gotten it to fail is
            to boil or soak for a long time test joints. They don't fail on their
            own, but the glue is substantially weakened. It seems to regain its
            strength when the joint dries. Dry it seems to hold as well as epoxy.
            It especially seems appropriate when the boat will be sealed with
            epoxy anyway.

            Here in the humid south, I've had problems with Weldwood. Two masts
            using this as the sole adhesive both delaminated in the hot sun. So I
            avoid weldwood and use the cheaper and easier Titebond II.

            Gary Blankenship
            Tallahassee, FL

            P.S. Someone a couple weeks ago had a question about Clear Cote and
            Fiberglass Coatings Inc. epoxies. They are two different companies,
            but both are in St. Petersburg, FL. I don't have addresses or nubmers
            handy, but you can get that from directory assistance; area code 727.
            Of the two, Fiberglass Coatings seems to have a wider variety of
            epoxies, I like them better and they are a few dollars cheaper. Big
            drawback is they sell it in paint cans, which makes it impossible to
            pour small amounts (I use small dixie type cups to dip it out....).
            I've heard they will on request sell in plastic bottles, will find
            that out when I visit them later today!


            -- In bolger@egroups.com, "Garth Battista" <garth@b...> wrote:
            > I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint).
            > When it came time to glue on Toto's wales, I thought, OK, rather
            than
            > gooping it up with the sure thing, epoxy, I'll finally try wood
            glue,
            > as per Payson's book, and Michalak's instructions. No Weldwood to
            be
            > found at our lumberyard, but they had this bottle of premixed
            > Titebond II, quite inexpensive.
            > It says it "outperforms all other wood glues." "Passes ANSI
            > Type II water resistance testing." "Ideal for exterior uses" but
            > "not recommended for use below the waterline or for continuous
            > submersion." All sounds OK for wales, I guess. But how does it
            stack
            > up against the most-mentioned wood glue, Weldwood? And what exactly
            > are the ANSI Type II water resistance standards?
            >
            > Has anyone ever used both and formed an opinion as to which is
            best?
            > The Titebond is a cinch to apply, with its applicator nozzle. But
            is
            > it just a glorified Elmer's? Any advice appreciated.
            >
            > Looking forward to the next boat,
            > Garth
          • Robert N. Lundy
            For Fiberglass Coatings offerings etc., go to www.fgci.com And you can get their products in jugs-you just have to ask-their default is paint cans. The paint
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 6, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              For Fiberglass Coatings offerings etc., go to www.fgci.com

              And you can get their products in jugs-you just have to ask-their default is
              paint cans. The paint cans suck.

              Robert & Amy Lundy
              St. Petersburg, fla.
              robert@...
              amy@...


              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: gbship@... [mailto:gbship@...]
              > Sent: April 06, 2000 1:17 AM
              > To: bolger@egroups.com
              > Subject: [bolger] Re: Weldwood vs. Titebond II?
              >
              >
              > Titebond II has held well in a variety of uses on three different
              > boats; from masts to rubrails. The only way I've gotten it to fail is
              > to boil or soak for a long time test joints. They don't fail on their
              > own, but the glue is substantially weakened. It seems to regain its
              > strength when the joint dries. Dry it seems to hold as well as epoxy.
              > It especially seems appropriate when the boat will be sealed with
              > epoxy anyway.
              >
              > Here in the humid south, I've had problems with Weldwood. Two masts
              > using this as the sole adhesive both delaminated in the hot sun. So I
              > avoid weldwood and use the cheaper and easier Titebond II.
              >
              > Gary Blankenship
              > Tallahassee, FL
              >
              > P.S. Someone a couple weeks ago had a question about Clear Cote and
              > Fiberglass Coatings Inc. epoxies. They are two different companies,
              > but both are in St. Petersburg, FL. I don't have addresses or nubmers
              > handy, but you can get that from directory assistance; area code 727.
              > Of the two, Fiberglass Coatings seems to have a wider variety of
              > epoxies, I like them better and they are a few dollars cheaper. Big
              > drawback is they sell it in paint cans, which makes it impossible to
              > pour small amounts (I use small dixie type cups to dip it out....).
              > I've heard they will on request sell in plastic bottles, will find
              > that out when I visit them later today!
              >
              >
              > -- In bolger@egroups.com, "Garth Battista" <garth@b...> wrote:
              > > I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint).
              > > When it came time to glue on Toto's wales, I thought, OK, rather
              > than
              > > gooping it up with the sure thing, epoxy, I'll finally try wood
              > glue,
              > > as per Payson's book, and Michalak's instructions. No Weldwood to
              > be
              > > found at our lumberyard, but they had this bottle of premixed
              > > Titebond II, quite inexpensive.
              > > It says it "outperforms all other wood glues." "Passes ANSI
              > > Type II water resistance testing." "Ideal for exterior uses" but
              > > "not recommended for use below the waterline or for continuous
              > > submersion." All sounds OK for wales, I guess. But how does it
              > stack
              > > up against the most-mentioned wood glue, Weldwood? And what exactly
              > > are the ANSI Type II water resistance standards?
              > >
              > > Has anyone ever used both and formed an opinion as to which is
              > best?
              > > The Titebond is a cinch to apply, with its applicator nozzle. But
              > is
              > > it just a glorified Elmer's? Any advice appreciated.
              > >
              > > Looking forward to the next boat,
              > > Garth
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Get a NextCard Visa, in 30 seconds!
              > 1. Fill in the brief application
              > 2. Receive approval decision within 30 seconds
              > 3. Get rates as low as 2.9% Intro or 9.9% Fixed APR
              > Apply NOW!
              > http://click.egroups.com/1/975/6/_/3457/_/954998212/
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
            • Daniel Curnutte
              In England it is nigh on impossible to find Weldwood... The Titebond sounds like our local equivilant.. Hard as Nails and looks like glorified Elmers... I
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 17, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                In England it is nigh on impossible to find Weldwood... The Titebond
                sounds like our local equivilant.."Hard as Nails" and looks like
                glorified Elmers... I have just started using a product by Humbrol
                (big UK adhesives co.)called Cascamite.. Other European builders
                might find this useful. It is easy to find, comes as a powder and
                mixes with water.. Even says on container.. Suitable for
                Boatbuilding!! It costs about $24 for 1.5kg of powder (about a third
                of price of epoxy).
                I have used Epoxy on my Micro for the Hull, Bulkheads and saved some
                to glue together the keel and stick in lead plug. The Cascamite is
                being used for decks etc...
                It sounds like my Cascamite is identical to Weldwood.. Can I use it
                to glue my 25' mast together???
              • Mark Paquette
                I don t now if anyone else has found this info. so here we go. I found their web site and some info on Type II testing. Check out the link below to see
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 17, 2000
                • 0 Attachment
                  I don't now if anyone else has found this info. so here we go. I
                  found their web site and some info on Type II testing. Check out the
                  link below to see additional info on Titebond.

                  00341 Revision Date: 3/10/00
                  What is the difference between Type I and Type II testing?

                  Type I testing: boiling for 4 hours; oven at 140�F for 19 hours.
                  This
                  happens for 2 cycles and then the bonds are checked for delamination.
                  The bonds are then broken and must pass a certain strength before
                  they break. The bonds are checked for wood failure.

                  Type II testing: Wood soaked for 4 hours; oven at 120�F for 19
                  hours.
                  This repeated for a total of 3 cycles. The bonds are inspected for
                  delamination.
                  Both of these tests are done on 2" by 5" birch 3 ply plywood. Set up
                  like plywood- using 3-5 plys of wood.

                  �1999 Franklin International Legal Disclaimer Privacy Policy

                  http://www.titebond.com/

                  I think I will be using more of this stuff on my next boat.

                  Mark in MN.




                  --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Garth Battista" <garth@b...> wrote:
                  > I recently built a Michalak Toto (and before that, a Windsprint).
                  > When it came time to glue on Toto's wales, I thought, OK, rather
                  than
                  > gooping it up with the sure thing, epoxy, I'll finally try wood
                  glue,
                  > as per Payson's book, and Michalak's instructions. No Weldwood to
                  be
                  > found at our lumberyard, but they had this bottle of premixed
                  > Titebond II, quite inexpensive.
                  > It says it "outperforms all other wood glues." "Passes ANSI
                  > Type II water resistance testing." "Ideal for exterior uses" but
                  > "not recommended for use below the waterline or for continuous
                  > submersion." All sounds OK for wales, I guess. But how does it
                  stack
                  > up against the most-mentioned wood glue, Weldwood? And what exactly
                  > are the ANSI Type II water resistance standards?
                  >
                  > Has anyone ever used both and formed an opinion as to which is
                  best?
                  > The Titebond is a cinch to apply, with its applicator nozzle. But
                  is
                  > it just a glorified Elmer's? Any advice appreciated.
                  >
                  > Looking forward to the next boat,
                  > Garth
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.