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Re: PB - Cruising CAT

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  • Howard Stephenson
    I was really thinking about the design in comparison with a monohull which would be easier to build even if it were cold-moulded, and have a roomier interior.
    Message 1 of 67 , Dec 1, 2004
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      I was really thinking about the design in comparison with a monohull
      which would be easier to build even if it were cold-moulded, and have
      a roomier interior. It might even have better stability if it were
      easier for the crew to be seated closer to the side than is intended
      with the Bolger cat. It would be marginally slower than the cat. If
      you picked a popular design you'd have a better chance of better
      resale value.

      Have a look at the Hartley 21 at:
      http://www.hartley-boats.com/21.html

      ... to see what a similar-sized monohull trailer-sailer would offer.
      There are plenty of more-modern designs of a similar size and
      configuration, including those from Bolger and Michalak.

      I admit to prejudice against Bolger multihulls, although I have none
      against multihulls in general. My first boat was a 20' tri. In this
      size, a tri makes a lot of sense -- but that opens up a completely
      new debate.

      Howard

      . --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@h...> wrote:
      > Expressing some dissent with what
      > > Howard Stephenson wrote:
      > > -- it would be costly to build (but at least the hulls are
      > > symmetrical, so there would need to be only one mould), with poor
      > > resale value
      >
      > Of course, *all* boats have poor resale value.
      > Those hulls could be cold molded quickly, [if] you could
      > resist the urge to overdo the glossy finish. Not that
      > much different than building two big canoes.
      >
    • dbaldnz
      Mine were a small racing cat and a 30ft tri, so didn t really compare. But I sail with a friend in his 27ft racing/cruising cat. I don t prefer either, both
      Message 67 of 67 , Dec 11, 2004
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        Mine were a small racing cat and a 30ft tri, so didn't really compare.
        But I sail with a friend in his 27ft racing/cruising cat. I don't
        prefer either, both have given memorable sails. I especially remember
        swooping through a monohull fleet in the cat, gybing from side to side
        under a big reaching spinnaker...sheer bliss!
        DonB

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Todd" <ktsrfer@m...> wrote:
        >
        > Which one did you prefer the cat or the tri. Where they both same
        > length /size.
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dbaldnz" <oink@w...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have owned and sailed both Todd, though not with sharpie hulls
        > > DonB
        > >
        > > Wow I'm ammazed that DonB
        > > > would even try and compare a cat to a tri!
        > > >
        > > > Todd
        > > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dbaldnz" <oink@w...> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Even trimarans with much narrower (on the bottom) flat
        > bottomed
        > > > floats
        > > > > > pound uncomfortably when going to windward in lumpy
        > conditions.
        > > > > > I imagine the Bolger cat would be fun for messing about in
        > > > sheltered
        > > > > > waters, but that would be about it.
        > > > > > DonB
        > > > >
        > > > > Mr Bolger has seculated that a flat bottom may pound less than
        > a
        > > > slight V
        > > > > because of the chussionng effect of the air compresses
        > between
        > > > boat and
        > > > > water just before impact I wonder how thing might effect
        > this
        > > > craft?
        > > > > jeffery
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