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Re: Black Skimmer again

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  • mannthree
    ... He is also willing to answer questions directly via telephone. I have not built the Skimmer (probably never will) but I was really captured by its beauty
    Message 1 of 40 , Nov 30, 2004
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Harry James <welshman@p...> wrote:
      > I also have the Payson plans and at $40 USD they are good value.
      He is also willing to answer questions directly via telephone. I
      have not built the Skimmer (probably never will) but I was really
      captured by its beauty under sail that even the relatively poor
      quality photos could not conceal. Two things bothered me about the
      design and these were the leeboards and the 34' mast for one version
      of the rig. My uninformed opinion re the leeboards was that they
      were too much trouble to operate and the mast would be the
      proverbial "bugger" to get up and down. There is one site showing a
      tabernacle as the solution to this. It is though one of the more
      striking of the bolger designs and I also believe that a centerboard
      version has been built in New Zealand,

      Cheers,

      John Mann (Sydney Australia)

      I have the Payson plans, clear, simple and easy to understand.
      >
      > HJ
      >
      > Howard Stephenson wrote:
      >
      > >I suppose you've been to the Payson website at
      > >http://www.instantboats.com
      > >
      > >Payson sells the plans for $40. They might be slightly dearer or
      > >cheaper from Bolger, but there won't be much in it. You could
      always
      > >fax him and ask but why bother? Payson has set up an easy way of
      > >ordering from him.
      > >
      > >The study plan at http://www.instantboats.com/images/bskimpr2.gif
      is
      > >a composite taken from parts of two of the four sheets of plans
      you
      > >would get from Payson. Assuming these four sheets are the same as
      > >reproduced in "The Folding Schooner", they comprise:
      > >-- sailplan plus spar and rigging details
      > >-- internal/external plan/profile plus leeboard details
      > >-- layout on plywood sheets, sections plus chine and stem details
      > >-- bulkheads, deck crown, false head
      > >
      > >The book lists a 52-point "Key to Plans". You would certainly
      want
      > >this and most likely it is what Payson refers to as
      > >the "specifications" he provides. If it's not, someone would
      surely
      > >fax you a copy from the book.
      > >
      > >As Payson says: " ... cuddy has enough area for five adults to
      sleep,
      > >but is intended to be convenient for a couple using camp-type
      > >equipment; it's dry, well ventilated, with a good view out." You
      can
      > >get a good idea of what's inside the cuddy from the study plan. A
      > >photo wouldn't help much as it's just a bare space.
      > >
      > >It is pretty, isn't it? I think leeboards look shippy, but many
      don't
      > >like them. Someone else might like to compare BS with each of the
      > >three Chebacco boats.
      > >
      > >Howard
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Nels
      ... There was one built somewhere in California but I never saw the finished product. I have always been attracted to the design as it has a lot of interior
      Message 40 of 40 , Dec 15, 2004
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        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Will Samson" <willsamson@y...> wrote:
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: pvanderwaart
        > Or maybe a Whalewatcher? Have any of those ever been launched?
        >
        > Bill
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        There was one built somewhere in California but I never saw the
        finished product. I have always been attracted to the design as it
        has a lot of interior space to sleep four adults. Imagined myself
        using it on the big rivers and canal systems.

        I think the major drawbacks are first the huge leeboards, that
        develop lee helm when partially raised. This was improved in the
        double pivoting boards in the WJS. Whalewatcher uses a bow
        daggerboard which is a sort of "make do" complication. Secondly, it
        will probably pound a lot, especially when motoring which one would
        need to be able to do in rivers and canals. I wonder how it would
        work with a box cutwater like Super Brick and a off-center board like
        Birdwatcher?

        My first choice now would be BWll(Birdwatcher II) for a couple and
        WJS (William Jochems Schooner.) for four people. Either choice is far
        more somplicated than Whalewatcher but would give better all around
        performance I would guess.

        Birdwatcher is PCB's favorite all-time design which is really saying
        something!

        Cheers, Nels
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