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[bolger] Weldwood for Fillets

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  • Teakdeck@aol.com
    Bolgeratti, As some of you may recall, I am epoxy challenged (terribly allergic to the stuff). But I want to try my hand at stitch and glue construction. I
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2000
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      Bolgeratti,

      As some of you may recall, I am epoxy challenged (terribly allergic to the
      stuff). But I want to try my hand at stitch and glue construction. I just
      read about Jim Michalak using Bondo for filleting with polyester resin ( I
      have read much about what's wrong with polyester, that is not what I'm
      concerned about) over the fiberglass tape. I thought to myself, why not
      Weldwood (standard instant boat glue) thickened with silica? So, why not?

      Also, any good ideas about pivoting leeboards?

      Mike Masten
    • Jeff Gilbert
      Mike -a guy down here built a 21 x 6ft Ketch skiff. He pivoted leeboards off traier hubs, bolting them right on instead of a wheel. Hey. maybe you could bolt
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2000
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        Mike -a guy down here built a 21 x 6ft Ketch skiff.
        He pivoted leeboards off traier hubs, bolting them
        right on instead of a wheel.
        Hey. maybe you could bolt them on at the waterline and sell your trailer!!
        Jeff Gilbert
        Doon Under

        %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
        From: <Teakdeck@...>
        To: <bolger@egroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2000 11:44 AM
        Mike Masten asks
        any good ideas about pivoting leeboards?
      • G Carlson
        I find that stuff pretty brittle, but I would bet adding chopped strand would be worth a try. Gregg Carlson
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 2, 2000
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          I find that stuff pretty brittle, but I would bet adding chopped strand
          would be worth a try.

          Gregg Carlson


          >Bolgeratti,
          >
          >As some of you may recall, I am epoxy challenged (terribly allergic to the
          >stuff). But I want to try my hand at stitch and glue construction. I just
          >read about Jim Michalak using Bondo for filleting with polyester resin ( I
          >have read much about what's wrong with polyester, that is not what I'm
          >concerned about) over the fiberglass tape. I thought to myself, why not
          >Weldwood (standard instant boat glue) thickened with silica? So, why not?
          >
          >Also, any good ideas about pivoting leeboards?
          >
          >Mike Masten
          >
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        • P. Vanderwaart
          I don t think that Weldwood would make good fillets. My Cynthia J. had leeboards on a simple pivot bolt as per the plan. Pictures in the vault. The topsides
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 2, 2000
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            I don't think that Weldwood would make good fillets.

            My Cynthia J. had leeboards on a simple pivot bolt as per the plan.
            Pictures in the vault. The topsides have a reinforcing pad on the inside. I
            bought cheap plastic (nylon? delrin?) thru-hull fittings and installed them
            a bushings in the leeboards because I though the simple holes through the
            plywood leeboards would get bigger and bigger as the boards worked in use.

            Boards mounted like this are easier to damage than ones that can pivot away
            from the boat. IF the board is forced sideways the strain is focused on the
            bolt area. On the other hand, they work on either tack. The boards need to
            be have leeboard guards to rest against both above and below the pivot.

            Peter
          • Mark Albanese
            I used Weldwood to cheaply smooth out the inner corner on a flattie kayak I built last year. Outside, there s an external chine log about 3/8 square. I mixed
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 3, 2000
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              I used Weldwood to cheaply smooth out the inner corner on a flattie
              kayak I built last year. Outside, there's an external chine log about
              3/8" square. I mixed the glue with some West Filleting Mix #405 I
              had around. I didn't even tape it.

              It came out nice, having a pretty good color to match the Philippine
              Mahogany ply.

              Brittle it may be, but I haven't had any trouble with cracking in
              one season of use, which included lots of swinging it up on top of
              the car, carrying it by the coaming over my shoulder a ways,
              grounding on the beach, jamming it into a corner of the garage, etc.
              And the boat doesn't even have a real deck to stiffen it, just some
              heat shrink dacron over a couple stringers with a Funnoodle coaming.

              I think Jim Michalak is a very reliable source of information, and
              you could certainly depend on Bondo to work well. But if I remember
              right, Bondo is pretty boring to mix and goes off very quickly.

              The only trouble with Weldwood is that, in the small 8 oz.
              containers commonly available, as glue it doesn't seem to be all that
              cheap anymore, compared to careful use of polyurethane or even a
              little epoxy from a big jug.

              I certainly would not use it for what you're proposing without keeping
              everything at 70 degrees while it sets up. Putting the tape on while
              the fillet is still wet will save a lot of sanding and improve adhesion.


              Unless its a totally throwaway boat anyhow, why not try some
              destructive testing and see if it works? The rule, courtesy of Harold
              Payson, is if you drive over a sample joint with your truck and the
              ply goes first it'll be all right in your boat.

              Mark
            • Russ Ingram
              I m building a concrete canoe (it s just something civil engineers do for fun!) and we re allowed to have up to 25% binding agents other than portland
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 3, 2000
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                I'm building a concrete canoe (it's just something civil engineers do
                for fun!) and we're allowed to have "up to 25% binding agents other
                than portland cement". I was using some Probond polyurethane glue,
                and noticed the instructions say that it cures in the presence of
                moisture, so I thought, "why not?". I mixed 3/4 lb. of cement with
                1/4 lb. of Probond, then added enough water so it was easy to work
                with. That stuff has set up harder than concrete...I'm going to mix
                enough next time to make some cubes so I can bust them in the
                compression machine. I'll let y'all know the results when I get them.


                --- In bolger@egroups.com, Teakdeck@a... wrote:
                > Bolgeratti,
                >
                > As some of you may recall, I am epoxy challenged (terribly allergic
                to the
                > stuff). But I want to try my hand at stitch and glue construction.
                I just
                > read about Jim Michalak using Bondo for filleting with polyester
                resin ( I
                > have read much about what's wrong with polyester, that is not what
                I'm
                > concerned about) over the fiberglass tape. I thought to myself, why
                not
                > Weldwood (standard instant boat glue) thickened with silica? So,
                why not?
                >
                > Also, any good ideas about pivoting leeboards?
                >
                > Mike Masten
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