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William D Jochem's Schooner (long)

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  • Bjorn Harbo
    Hello Group, I have been asked to make a report on my experience with WDJ/Jochems/Family Schooner - the baby seems to have many names. I will try to make it
    Message 1 of 29 , Nov 4, 2004
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      Hello Group,

      I have been asked to make a report on my experience with
      WDJ/Jochems/Family Schooner - the baby seems to have many names. I
      will try to make it brief (failed) and relevant:


      Building

      As many of you may know from my postings a couple of years ago I built
      Esmeralda on rough ground under a tarp (and a maple tree) in Oslo. The
      building season is short and the climate tough. IOW the conditions for
      building were not the best. The tarp blew off several times and the boat
      got drenched by heavy rains og was filled with wet snow in the
      winter. Regrettably I used cheap lauan/meranti threeply 1/2" sheets. Due
      to lack of boat building experience my consume of epoxy was excessive.

      I started building spring '99 and launched Esmeralda Sept 3, 2002. The
      best part of the actual construction took place during three periods
      of four weeks. I had little time work on the boat during evenings and
      weekends. I have no idea how many man hours (my father helped me a
      bit) were used. I do think that it was much less than the 2000 hours
      the Judge said he used. That said: It is obvious from the lack of
      finish in my boat that it was built under time pressure.

      The building site was on a parking lot at my father's place and the
      neighbours were not too happy having a strange looking boat under an
      insufficient tarp in front of their kitchen windows. As we aproached
      the winter of 2002/2003 I was forced to finish and launch - I simply
      could not expose my father and his fellow neighbours to another winter
      with the project unfinished.

      Although WDJ is a big and complex boat I experienced no technical
      problems during the building period. There were no tasks I did not
      handle myself (exept the metal hardware which I 'outsourced'). I was a
      totally unexperienced boat builder exept for the two stitch and glue
      kayaks I built in the summer of 1997 (the first built from a complete
      kit from CLC; the second I copied from the first). This was possible
      not due to my talent but thanks to an extremely well written and
      comprehensible construction manual and drawings. (when I reread this
      paragraph I feel like bragging. The intention however is to emphasize
      how surprisingly simple the construction technique is. Like building a
      stitch and glue kayak, just bigger).

      PB&SA changed important parts of the construction during my building
      period. I discovered this when I ordered a new set of drawings as the
      original ones were worn out. I had not been informed of this and was
      pretty surprised. It concerned the design of the water ballast tanks,
      their flushing and filling and most important of all: the construction
      of the leeboard brackets and their connection with the hull. At that
      time I had already finished the leeboards and all that was connected
      with them. Reconstructing these parts of the boat would have meant big
      time surgery: removing the brackets themselves, rebuilding them,
      removing and reconstructing major parts of the two forward bunks and
      the water ballast tanks. I asked PCB&SA if this was really necessary
      and was assured that the mentioned changes were made due to failure in
      BIGGER boats with a similar leeboard system. The prototype Sapphire
      sailing on Lake Mead and in San Francisco Bay had had no problems with
      the leeboards at all.

      My boat does not need to be trailerable. I have a permanent berth in a
      Marina in Oslo and my boat club offers storing the member's boats on
      land during the winter. I will never afford a car big enough to
      transport Esmeralda anyway. Since the boat was to stay in the water
      from ultimo april till primo november each year I got second thoughts
      about the water tanks (regrettably AFTER they were finished). I had
      night mares about tiny cracks in the epoxy layer in the tanks, water
      creeping into the cheap ply and inducing rot and whatever). I wanted
      my ballast tanks dry. My first thought was to replace the water with
      lead. That would save space and let me use the tanks for storing
      useful things like beer... Negative consequence: exit
      unsinkability. Having wife and five kids makes one think that
      unsinkability is a good thing. However: It is not a bad thing to avoid
      rot and short life of a precious boat either. Weighing these to
      factors against eachother requires also emphasis on the probability of
      situations where unsinkability is important... As long as I sail in
      relativly sheltered waters (Oslo Fjord) I think that "avoiding rot"
      wins...

      Let me jump to the conclusion and spare you further details of my
      considerations: I bought some leadpigs (25 kgs each), wrapped them in
      plastic, put 9 mm rope around them and fastened them to the bottom of
      the ballast tank bottom with thickened epoxy. I got this idea from
      Sven Yrvind who visited me at this crucial point of construction. The
      upside of the method: I will at any time easily be able to remove the
      pigs by cutting the rope and take the pigs out of the plastic. And
      hopefully the pigs will not loosen should the boat lean 90 deg or -
      heaven forbid - turn over. I think I have placed six pigs (150 kgs) on
      each side of the boat.

      The next step was to fill 5 liter (5000 cc) plastic cans with water
      and fill the rest of the space in the water tanks with them (sorry, no
      more room for beer, not in the tanks anyway..). I think there are abt
      20 cans, IOW another 100 kgs ballast. The boat is now dry inside, I
      don't have to worry about rot and I just have to hope for the best if
      my hull should take a serious leak... If I need to add ballast down
      low I can replace the water with sand.


      Money

      I intended to make a note of every penny (krone) that went into the
      project - and did not make a single one (note that is)... My
      guesstimate is abt 100000 NOK, (USD 12000). That is what I tell my
      wife, anyway. The sails (much too heavy and expensive for the boat)
      were 30000 NOK (USD 3500). As mentioned before I used cheap ply. That
      was my first investment and I thought I made a clever deal. Big
      mistake. My advice: buy good plywood! (The bitterness of low quality
      remains long after the sweet taste of low price is forgotten...)


      Sailing

      Amazing! Fabilous! A dream! And she is stiff! She tracks like on
      rails. Trimming is possible due to four sails, two leeboards and a
      retractable rudder. She does not point high (I don't care either). She
      is impressivly fast in light wind (large wardrobe). The rig is
      BEAUTIFUL!! And she does not go well to windward (since you keep
      asking).

      The best part of the boat for my needs is the fact that the boat is
      tremendiously spacy. Four full size single berths, a galley with two
      counters, big lockers, one head and HUGE windows. Sitting on the bunks
      while sailing, being able to breath FRESH air through the large hatch
      openings that also allow a view to all sails and still have the
      feeling of being ON DECK, is something I have not experienced in any
      boat of this size before. I don't have to worry about my kids who can
      play around inside, keep track of what is happening outside and stay
      completely safe and dry. I have a nice video showing exactly this part
      of the sailing.

      Handling the schooner rig with four sails is fun if not intuitive to a
      former dinghy sailor. All four sheets are led to the cockpit. And
      hoisting and lowering sails are handled from the cockpit or cabin. No
      need to go on deck. To stow the jib you have to climb into the forward
      well. From here you may in completely safety take care of the ground
      tackle.

      The masts are easily raised and lowered even without the "default"
      worm gear (I am not sure if that is the correct word either..). I
      shortened the masts by 2 ft acording to PCB&SA's recommendations. My
      gaffs are hollow although I used 15 mm planks instead of 12 mm
      (1/2"). My sails are probably MUCH heavier than WDJ #1. Nevertheless:
      as already mentioned: my ship feels stiff. I have been sailing alone
      in fresh breeze with all four sails up. The boat leans 45 deg or so
      and stays there. I have never felt unsafe and the cockpit stays dry.


      Under power

      To maneuver the boat in tight places it is necessary to steer with the
      motor and to lower at least one leeboard. This is the trickiest part
      of the boat handling in my opinion. It may be due to my relatively
      limited boating experience. If you can afford it: buy four stroke
      engines. Mine is noisy.


      At anchor

      There has been some postings abt slapping at anchor in flat bottomed
      boats lately. This is also the case with WDJ even with the small
      "keel" in the bow which is supposed to "cut" the water. For what it is
      worth: I am not disturbed by these acustic background at all.


      Problems

      One single problem: Late July 2003 I was sailing in heavy weather with
      one of my sons, then 13 years old. I never keep track of exact wind
      speed or wave height but my wife deared not join us. We sailed with
      fore sail, no jib and reefed main. My son was not comfortable with
      this and we desided to go by motor to another marina. To reach this
      marine we had to round a peninsula. The waves interfered and the see
      got pretty rough. I steerd 90 deg to the waves (obviously bad
      seemanship) and there was almost no progress as the propeller was out
      of the water and hence ineffectiv every time we were on top of a
      wave. My son insisted on going back to where we came from and I made a
      180 deg turn. Both leeboards were lowered to there maximum. As I were
      parallel to the waves I heard a loud crack and my son who had sought
      shelter on the forward port berth came like a torpedo through into the
      cockpit screaming: the boat is sinking!

      (Kunstpause...)

      Well. We were not exactly going under. The situation was nevertheless
      quite frightening. The port leeboard was still attached to its
      bracket. The bracket itself had loosened from the bracket shelf on its
      lower part. The bracket shelf is a horisontal laminate of two 1/2"
      plywood pieces, abt 5' long and 8" wide fastened to the hull with
      screws, epoxy fillets and glass (on both sides). The bracket on which
      the leebord rests and to which it is connected with a 1/2" SS bolt
      (the pivot) is fastened to the shelf with fillets and glass on its
      lower part. The upper part ist fastened to the hull with several
      screws and thickened epoxy. The weight of the water had forced the
      port leeboard outwards (at the given time the weather side) tearing
      the lower part of the bracket from the shelf and pressing the upper
      part of the bracket INTO the hull. The latter is what caused the loud
      cracking. There was a 1' long horisontal crack in the hull along the
      window forward of the gally port side. This is in safe distance from
      the waterline and represented no immediate danger. However the
      leeboard could no longer be used and that was my last sail with
      Esmeralda as till today had not had time to make the repair.


      How could this happen?

      First of all: this did not happen while sailing. When sailing the
      preassure of the water is preassure of the water is on the 'outside'
      of the leeboard and then there must be a traction of the upper part of
      the bracket directly connected to the hull and compression of the
      lower part which is less effectivly connected to the shelf. The
      construction as originally designed seems adequately dimensioned for
      sailing.

      It probably is for the kind of motorsailing I did as well - had I been
      a better boat builder. When removing the bracket this fall I
      shamefully discovered the many voids in the lamination between hull
      and upper part of the bracket. This does of cours NOT explain the
      failure of the bracket. However - it might have caused a failure while
      sailing. More serious: the connection between the lower part of the
      bracket and the shelf was not as secure as the drawing and building
      manual instructs the builder to make it: I had NOT applied the glass
      fabric to strengthen the fillets. If this joint had been strong enough
      the impression of the hull caudal to the pivot had not occured.


      Que faire?

      Till now I have not had time to complete the repair. I have removed
      the brackets and made large openings in the berths to gain access to
      the inside of the hull. The before mentioned changes in the
      construction drawings show a completely different attachements of the
      leeboard to the hull. Much too complicated for me to explain in
      Norwenglish... The most important feature is that the pivot now is
      3/4" and goes through the hull which in this part of the boat is
      doubled and strengthened by a vertical 5" ply lamination. I have made
      the major parts and hope to finish till spring next year.

      This incident has not affected my view of the boat. I take 100%
      responsibility for the accident which I am sure had not happened had I
      been both a better boat builder and a better sailor. Lesson learned.

      I have NOT seen the latest article in MAIB.

      I am damned proud of this boat and will happily recommend the design
      to anyone who is willing to invest time and money into a big building
      project. (Just make sure your wife agrees.............)
      --
      Bjorn Harbo
    • Rick Bedard
      Bjorn, Excellent report. Thank you.... I want to dig out my Jochems plans and order a pile of plywood. [ Not 3-ply though :) ] Now, how do I get a copy of that
      Message 2 of 29 , Nov 4, 2004
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        Bjorn,

        Excellent report. Thank you....
        I want to dig out my Jochems plans and order a pile of plywood. [ Not 3-ply though :) ]

        Now, how do I get a copy of that video you made?

        Rick Bedard

        Bjorn Harbo <bharbo@...> wrote:
        Hello Group,

        I have been asked to make a report on my experience with
        WDJ/Jochems/Family Schooner - the baby seems to have many names. I
        will try to make it brief (failed) and relevant:




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bjorn Harbo
        ... As soon as I can get my DV-editing program working I can make DVD copies. Hope to be there soon. Bjørn
        Message 3 of 29 , Nov 4, 2004
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          Rick Bedard <sctree@...> writes:

          > Now, how do I get a copy of that video you made?
          >
          > Rick Bedard

          As soon as I can get my DV-editing program working I can make DVD
          copies. Hope to be there soon.

          Bjørn
        • Rick Bedard
          Thank you Bjørn. Let me know when... Rick Bjorn Harbo wrote: ... As soon as I can get my DV-editing program working I can make DVD copies.
          Message 4 of 29 , Nov 4, 2004
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            Thank you Bj�rn. Let me know when...
            Rick




            Bjorn Harbo <bharbo@...> wrote:

            Rick Bedard <sctree@...> writes:

            > Now, how do I get a copy of that video you made?
            >
            > Rick Bedard

            As soon as I can get my DV-editing program working I can make DVD
            copies. Hope to be there soon.

            Bj�rn


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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Peter Lenihan
            ... I heard a loud crack and my son who had sought ... the ... nevertheless ... Bjorn, Thank you for a wonderful review of your experience and the sharing of
            Message 5 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bjorn Harbo <bharbo@o...> wrote:
              I heard a loud crack and my son who had sought
              > shelter on the forward port berth came like a torpedo through into
              the
              > cockpit screaming: the boat is sinking!
              >
              > (Kunstpause...)
              >
              > Well. We were not exactly going under. The situation was
              nevertheless
              > quite frightening.


              Bjorn,

              Thank you for a wonderful review of your experience and the
              sharing of your observations regarding your WDJ schooner.This is a
              most intriguing design which I certainly daydreamed about on more
              then one occassion:-)
              Your Norwenglish is perfectly understandable and readable.
              However,I must confess to enjoying something of a belly-laugh when I
              read the above incident and pronounced the word "Kunstpause" with
              anglo phonetics. In fact, I came within a Kunsthair of spraying
              coffee all over the monitor! This is not boat related,but please
              tell me if the K is pronounced hard,soft or silent.......it makes a
              BIG difference to english ears :-)
              Considering the your high level of determination in building a
              WGJ schooner in much less then "perfect" conditions, I am most
              confident that you will successfully complete your
              repair/modification and end up with an even better boat to
              confidently sail about some beautiful sea-scapes rekowned in your
              part of the world.
              Continued success to you and happy sailing next year!!!!


              Sincerely,

              Peter Lenihan, who loves long posts and is very much guilty of
              same,especially with the approaching long nights of winter....and
              no,this does not apply to those crazy antipodeans about to drive us
              crazy with tales of their approaching summer hijinks( you KNOW who
              you are! :-D )
            • Peter Lenihan
              ... After Ricks copy, make one for moi too please! I can only pay in Canadian dollars but they are gaining in value relative to the U.S. greenback :-)
              Message 6 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bjorn Harbo <bharbo@o...> wrote:
                > Rick Bedard <sctree@y...> writes:
                >
                > > Now, how do I get a copy of that video you made?
                > >
                > > Rick Bedard
                >
                > As soon as I can get my DV-editing program working I can make DVD
                > copies. Hope to be there soon.
                >
                > Bjørn

                After Ricks copy, make one for moi too please! I can only pay in
                Canadian dollars but they are gaining in value relative to the U.S.
                greenback :-)

                Sincerely,

                Peter Lenihan,who says"to hell with editing,I wanna see the whole
                thing blury,out-of-focus,skittish and all"!,from along the blustery
                shores of the St.Lawrence.........
              • Will Samson
                Bjorn, Something I ve always wondered about these boats with the cucumber frame tops ( - makes a change from glasshouse and was used by Arthur Ransome to
                Message 7 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                  Bjorn,

                  Something I've always wondered about these boats with the 'cucumber frame' tops ( - makes a change from 'glasshouse' and was used by Arthur Ransome to describe Jemmerling's powerboat - ) is how bothered are you by windage?

                  Of course this also applies to Birdwatcher-types, 'Cruising' version of Chebacco, Micro-Navigator and so on.

                  I'd be interested in an analysis of whether it adversely affects windward performance, and effectively turns a sailing boat into a 'motorsailer'.

                  Bill

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Bjorn Harbo
                  ... I ... Thanks Peter. BTW, isn t it middle in the night at the Bay of Fundy right now??? Kunstpause is Altenburger-speek and is pronounced with a K like in
                  Message 8 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                    > However,I must confess to enjoying something of a belly-laugh when
                    I
                    > read the above incident and pronounced the word "Kunstpause" with
                    > anglo phonetics. In fact, I came within a Kunsthair of spraying
                    > coffee all over the monitor! This is not boat related,but please
                    > tell me if the K is pronounced hard,soft or silent.......it makes a
                    > BIG difference to english ears :-)

                    Thanks Peter. BTW, isn't it middle in the night at the Bay of Fundy
                    right now???

                    Kunstpause is Altenburger-speek and is pronounced with a K like in
                    kite. (as a matter of fact it is written and pronounced almost
                    identical in Norwegian as well)

                    Bjørn
                  • Bjorn Harbo
                    ... frame tops ( - makes a change from glasshouse and was used by Arthur Ransome to describe Jemmerling s powerboat - ) is how bothered are you by windage?
                    Message 9 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Will Samson" <willsamson@y...> wrote:
                      > Bjorn,
                      >
                      > Something I've always wondered about these boats with the 'cucumber
                      frame' tops ( - makes a change from 'glasshouse' and was used by
                      Arthur Ransome to describe Jemmerling's powerboat - ) is how bothered
                      are you by windage?
                      >
                      > Of course this also applies to Birdwatcher-types, 'Cruising'
                      version of Chebacco, Micro-Navigator and so on.
                      >
                      > I'd be interested in an analysis of whether it adversely affects
                      windward performance, and effectively turns a sailing boat into
                      a 'motorsailer'.
                      >
                      > Bill

                      Bill,
                      As PCB says in the video: the influence of the raised deck on windage
                      is negligable compared to the rig on sailboats. I don't know. What I
                      know is that without leeboards down the drift is enormous when
                      motoring. This is probably more due to the flat bottom and lack
                      of "integrated" submersed lateral resistence than increased "above
                      water surface" lateral area.
                      Bjørn
                    • Peter Lenihan
                      ... Fundy ... Thanks for the clarification Bjorn.I m still laughing,but what does it mean? :-) The sun will soon be rising over the Bay of Fundy or at least I
                      Message 10 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bjorn Harbo" <bharbo@o...> wrote:
                        > Thanks Peter. BTW, isn't it middle in the night at the Bay of
                        Fundy
                        > right now???
                        >
                        > Kunstpause is Altenburger-speek and is pronounced with a K like in
                        > kite. (as a matter of fact it is written and pronounced almost
                        > identical in Norwegian as well)


                        Thanks for the clarification Bjorn.I'm still laughing,but what does
                        it mean? :-)
                        The sun will soon be rising over the Bay of Fundy or at least I hope
                        it will be sunny for them! I'm still a ways further West of them,in
                        Montreal to be exact,and enjoying the darkness of night.Something
                        easily accomplished when working the night shift :-)

                        Sincerely,

                        Peter Lenihan
                      • Bjorn Harbo
                        ... Thanks for the clarification Bjorn.I m still laughing,but what does ... Dramatic Pause Die Kunst = l art
                        Message 11 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@h...> >
                          Thanks for the clarification Bjorn.I'm still laughing,but what does
                          > it mean? :-)

                          "Dramatic Pause"
                          Die Kunst = l'art
                        • Peter Lenihan
                          ... does ... Ah.....vielen Dank! Peter Lenihan
                          Message 12 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bjorn Harbo" <bharbo@o...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <peterlenihan@h...>
                            >
                            > Thanks for the clarification Bjorn.I'm still laughing,but what
                            does
                            > > it mean? :-)
                            >
                            > "Dramatic Pause"
                            > Die Kunst = l'art

                            Ah.....vielen Dank!

                            Peter Lenihan
                          • pvanderwaart
                            ... Thanks for taking the time to make your long report. It s very interesting to get reports on whether these unusual boats live up to the designers hopes.
                            Message 13 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                              > I steered 90 deg to the waves (obviously bad
                              > seamanship) and there was almost no progress as the
                              > propeller was out
                              > of the water and hence ineffective...

                              Thanks for taking the time to make your long report. It's very
                              interesting to get reports on whether these unusual boats live up to
                              the designers' hopes. In this case, pretty well, I guess.

                              A comment about strong wind and rough water. The naive assumption is
                              that a sailboat can survive rough water better with the sails down
                              and the motor on. I don't think so, myself. On my current boat and
                              my previous boat, progress to windward becomes difficult at
                              surpisingly low wind speeds, say 12 knots, when the boat can still
                              be sailed upwind easily and with pleasure. The reason is that the ob
                              does not keep the propeller in the water, much as you describe.

                              I have also found that peak stresses on the rig are due to waves and
                              not to gusts. Water is denser than air, and the boat gets tossed
                              more harshly by waves. This is probably true of leeboards too, and
                              it's very believeable to me that your leeboard bracket would not
                              have failed if the sail had been raised.

                              Thanks again, and good luck with your repair.

                              Peter
                            • Bruce Hallman
                              ... I recall reading PCB writing of the effect of height on wind resistance, [in context of tabernacled masts] in a hurricane. The wind resistance on wire
                              Message 14 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                                >'glasshouse' windage?
                                > Bill

                                I recall reading PCB writing of the effect of height
                                on wind resistance, [in context of tabernacled
                                masts] in a hurricane. The wind resistance on
                                wire stays high up might even exceed the wind
                                resistance on a cabin relatively low down.

                                If I am not mistaken, all the Bolger 'glass house'
                                sail boats have unstayed masts, and most are
                                tabernacled. Those two features might reduce
                                wind resistance more than the 'high' cabins would
                                increase it.

                                The exception being, Insolent 60, which appears
                                to have backstays. She is so long that
                                her glasshouse cabin is not that tall relative to
                                her length.
                              • Bruce Hallman
                                ... Bjorn, The WDJ has hard slot top covers, hinged in the middle. Do they leak? I have a hard time imagining how a two part cover, with a hinge down the
                                Message 15 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                                  > I have been asked to make a report on my experience with
                                  > WDJ/Jochems/Family Schooner - --
                                  > Bjorn Harbo

                                  Bjorn,

                                  The WDJ has hard slot top covers, hinged in the middle.
                                  Do they leak?
                                  I have a hard time imagining how a two part cover, with
                                  a hinge down the middle could be made watertight.
                                • Bjorn Harbo
                                  ... Not one single drop - even in heavy rain - thanks to a single weatherstrip in the gap between the to cover halfs. That does not mean rain does not enter
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Nov 5, 2004
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                                    Bruce Hallman <bruce@...> writes:
                                    > Bjorn,
                                    >
                                    > The WDJ has hard slot top covers, hinged in the middle.
                                    > Do they leak?
                                    > I have a hard time imagining how a two part cover, with
                                    > a hinge down the middle could be made watertight.

                                    Not one single drop - even in heavy rain - thanks to a single
                                    weatherstrip in the gap between the to cover halfs. That does not mean
                                    rain does not enter the cabin.

                                    As far as I recall Judge Jochems tells in the video that Bolger's
                                    original rig proposal was a cat yawl. That would have located the main
                                    mast in the forward well and the mizzen mast way aft - both outside the
                                    cabin. The Judge thought the mast height would be a problem while
                                    trailering (damned right) and chose the next offer from the firm - a
                                    schooner rig with collapsable non protruding spars (when laid
                                    down). This led to the single objection I have with the design: the main
                                    mast located in the cabin - making the cabin roof "unsealable". Rain
                                    seeps into the cabin along the mast - through the deck and down to the
                                    bottom in the galley. The good thing is that the amount of water finding
                                    its way into the boat is surprisingly small - even after looong periods
                                    of heavy rain. As already mentioned: my boat stays in its seaberth for
                                    the whole season - often unattended for weeks. The water collected in
                                    the lowest part of the boat was NEVER more than a few teacups.

                                    The short answer to your question: the hatch design itself is absolutely
                                    hundred percent watertight.
                                  • Hugo Tyson
                                    Hi, I ve just added 3 more pictures of my fathers Spur II rowing boat to the photos section of Bolger4photos group. We went for a sail today in the Dolly
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                      Hi,

                                      I've just added 3 more pictures of my fathers "Spur II" rowing boat
                                      to the photos section of Bolger4photos group.

                                      We went for a sail today in the "Dolly T" catboat that my father
                                      finished building earlier this year.The Wind was very light but she
                                      ghosted off the mooring and downstream against an incoming tide and
                                      wind. We took no motor with us this time, but a pair of oars, just
                                      in case the wind died altogether. No pictures of her sailing yet,
                                      but hopefully next week I'll be able to take a few, weather
                                      depending! We seem to only have about two types of wind here,
                                      either too light(like today) or blowing half a gale!!
                                      Dad hasn't put the reef pendants in yet so we can't reef her yet.
                                      I expect that for most sailing in the afternoons during Summer 1
                                      reef may be neccessary as 20+ knots of wind are quite usual!
                                      She's a sweet boat and moves very nicely even in the lightest of
                                      winds and comes about very nicely due to the rocker of the keel and
                                      the fin skeg and "winged" rudder.



                                      And yes I agree with Peter lenihan, when I read Bjorn's phrase("Kuntspause" or whatever it was!) in his detailed review of his Jochem's Schooner I just about spilt my glass of wine over the computer's keyboard due to laughter!!!


                                      Hugo Tyson, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.








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                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Peter Lenihan
                                      ... boat ... Your Dad is really doing a very sweet job of her Hugo!...in fact,she looks like such a fine lined hull that I may consider building one myself to
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Hugo Tyson <hhetyson@y...> wrote:
                                        > Hi,
                                        >
                                        > I've just added 3 more pictures of my fathers "Spur II" rowing
                                        boat
                                        > to the photos section of Bolger4photos group.

                                        Your Dad is really doing a very sweet job of her Hugo!...in fact,she
                                        looks like such a fine lined hull that I may consider building one
                                        myself to carry around on the top of Windermere instead of the two
                                        dinghys shown on the plan.
                                        Can't wait for some rowing shots of her :-)

                                        Sincerely,
                                        Peter Lenihan,waiting for some snow,hopefully sooner then later from
                                        along the shores of the St.Lawrence...........
                                      • Hugo Tyson
                                        Hello Peter, I think she d be( a Spur II ) ideal as a boat to carry on your Windermere , if you build her using 6mm - 1/4 Okume Marine Ply she ll be very
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                          Hello Peter,

                                          I think she'd be( a Spur II ) ideal as a boat to carry on your "Windermere", if you build her using 6mm - 1/4" Okume Marine Ply she'll be very light, easy for car topping or hoisting aboard ,with probably a single Davit as long as you include a couple of well spaced and balanced Eybolts in the Keel.

                                          Guessing the weight of a completeted Spur II, no more than 50-60KG depending on materials used, maybe a little bit more if you wanted to put in some positive buoyancy in the bow and stern. She's fairly fine lined, so I don't know how stable she'll be(As in using her as a tender for a larger craft), but that's not the point, she's made for easy and relatively fast rowing! As Bolger says in BWAOM she's not a sailing boat, though he did include a sailing rig, which he hasn't bothered with, and nor will my father, especially with the typical winds we get here in summer!

                                          That latest posting of yours, I mean a few days ago about"Le Baron de Kingston/Le Mouton Noir de Kingston" (aka Bruce Hector) visit and the photos. Tell me what is "Porter", do you mean Port( fortified Red wine at about 18% alc./Vol) or is this some other brew with a medieval sounding name!? "Le Baron", driving his "Rustcheck Limo" after two bottles of port would certainly not have a driving license here if he was pulled over by the cops, and most likely a hefty fine. Are the drink driving laws in Canada fairly lax?

                                          Back to the Spur II, two-three weeks(before Christmas anyway!) and she should be in the water and I'll certainly post some photos of her under oars, which will be the only power used on this fine craft, no sail and certainly no motor!!

                                          Hugo Tyson, Launceston, Tasmania. Australia., enjoying a crisp, dry light(10.5%) white vino.

                                          Peter Lenihan <peterlenihan@...> wrote:

                                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Hugo Tyson <hhetyson@y...> wrote:
                                          > Hi,
                                          >
                                          > I've just added 3 more pictures of my fathers "Spur II" rowing
                                          boat
                                          > to the photos section of Bolger4photos group.

                                          Your Dad is really doing a very sweet job of her Hugo!...in fact,she
                                          looks like such a fine lined hull that I may consider building one
                                          myself to carry around on the top of Windermere instead of the two
                                          dinghys shown on the plan.
                                          Can't wait for some rowing shots of her :-)

                                          Sincerely,
                                          Peter Lenihan,waiting for some snow,hopefully sooner then later from
                                          along the shores of the St.Lawrence...........





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                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Bruce Hallman
                                          ... FWIW, in the late 1980 s Phil Bolger published [in SBJ] lines of a boat with very similar to details to Spur II. but 12 feet long instead of 16 feet. You
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                            > looks like such a fine lined hull that I may consider building one
                                            > myself to carry around on the top of Windermere instead of the two
                                            > dinghys shown on the plan.
                                            > Peter Lenihan

                                            FWIW, in the late 1980's Phil Bolger published [in SBJ] lines
                                            of a boat with very similar to details to Spur II. but 12 feet long
                                            instead of 16 feet. You might consider the shorter version,
                                            not rowing quite so perfectly as Spur II, but lifting and stowing
                                            more easily.
                                          • Peter Lenihan
                                            ... de Kingston/Le Mouton Noir de Kingston (aka Bruce Hector) visit and the photos. Tell me what is Porter , do you mean Port( fortified Red wine at about
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                              -- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Hugo Tyson <hhetyson@y...> wrote:
                                              > That latest posting of yours, I mean a few days ago about"Le Baron
                                              de Kingston/Le Mouton Noir de Kingston" (aka Bruce Hector) visit and
                                              the photos. Tell me what is "Porter", do you mean Port( fortified
                                              Red wine at about 18% alc./Vol) or is this some other brew with a
                                              medieval sounding name!? "Le Baron", driving his "Rustcheck Limo"
                                              after two bottles of port would certainly not have a driving license
                                              here if he was pulled over by the cops, and most likely a hefty
                                              fine. Are the drink driving laws in Canada fairly lax?


                                              Hugo,
                                              Thanks for the further details regarding your Dads SpurII.I'll
                                              look forward to some fine shots of her moving smartly under oars! It
                                              will also be interesting to hear just how tender she is.Bolger calls
                                              for a Junebug and Tortise(or is it a Brick?) for tenders up on
                                              Windermeres cabin top.He also shows home buildable davits to assit
                                              in the launching of these two small boats.Not that I have anything
                                              against these two worthy designs but I long for building something
                                              with lots more shape in it.
                                              You are correct,it is Port,the fortifide wine.I have always
                                              known it as Porto,since that is what the french call it up here and
                                              I know few english folk other then some of the group here.
                                              Le Baron had only ONE bottle of Porto and I the other.Yes,it
                                              would have put us in deep Kunstshit had we been stopped or had an
                                              accident but remember,we are pirates and our time here is but a
                                              quick flash of light before we are returned to the infinite
                                              night.Canada does have strict drunk driving laws which call for the
                                              immediate suspension of the drives license,a hefty fine and perhaps
                                              even jail time if mortal injuries are caused. I happen to think the
                                              law is too soft and have long tried to bring back hanging in the
                                              public square but with little luck.An over abundance of bleeding
                                              hearts up here,I guess :-)

                                              Sincerely,

                                              Peter Lenihan, who'd have to be in rather dire straights or in the
                                              presence of some rather alluring creature before ever letting
                                              chilled white wine pass my vulgar lips,from along the shores of the
                                              mighty St.Lawrence.............:-)
                                            • Peter Lenihan
                                              ... long ... And to think I gave all my old SBJs away years ago trusting in my then iron clad photgraphic memory to save me from future embarassment or to win
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Nov 6, 2004
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                                                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@h...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > FWIW, in the late 1980's Phil Bolger published [in SBJ] lines
                                                > of a boat with very similar to details to Spur II. but 12 feet
                                                long
                                                > instead of 16 feet.

                                                And to think I gave all my old SBJs away years ago trusting in my
                                                then iron clad photgraphic memory to save me from future
                                                embarassment or to win bets. Little did I know then that my iron
                                                would be so easily corroded to the point of ressembling a cheap
                                                collander where only the biggest chunks are caught and saved.
                                                Not wishing to tax you Bruce, but you wouldn't happen to have a scan
                                                of said wee SpurII,tucked away somewhere in your vast computer
                                                Bolger archive,just waiting to come out? I would be most interested
                                                in having a good peek at her,if so, and thank you for having a
                                                better quality iron clad memory then mine :-D

                                                Sincerely,

                                                Peter Lenihan
                                              • fountainb@switch.aust.com
                                                ... Should that be ScheißeKunst ? Bruce Fountain Systems Engineer Union Switch & Signal Perth, Western Australia [Non-text portions of this message have been
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Nov 7, 2004
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                                                  Peter Lenihan wrote:
                                                  > Le Baron had only ONE bottle of Porto and I the other.Yes,it
                                                  > would have put us in deep Kunstshit had we been stopped or had an
                                                  > accident

                                                  Should that be "ScheißeKunst"?

                                                  Bruce Fountain
                                                  Systems Engineer
                                                  Union Switch & Signal
                                                  Perth, Western Australia



                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Richard Spelling
                                                  Having built the Cruising chebacco, I would say that it has no noticable effect on windward performance. She is fast as hell off the wind, once outrunning a
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Feb 14 1:27 AM
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                                                    Having built the 'Cruising' chebacco, I would say that it has no
                                                    noticable effect on windward performance. She is fast as hell off
                                                    the wind, once outrunning a 22 foot sloop who had his little engine
                                                    going full blast...

                                                    She will out sail most other boats her size (or slightly bigger)
                                                    except to windward, then they slowly pull away. That said, I don't
                                                    think the pilot house degrades the windward performance much.
                                                    Certainly not enough to trade in the extra room you get with it.

                                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Will Samson" <willsamson@y...> wrote:
                                                    > Bjorn,
                                                    >
                                                    > Something I've always wondered about these boats with
                                                    the 'cucumber frame' tops ( - makes a change from 'glasshouse' and
                                                    was used by Arthur Ransome to describe Jemmerling's powerboat - ) is
                                                    how bothered are you by windage?
                                                    >
                                                    > Of course this also applies to Birdwatcher-types, 'Cruising'
                                                    version of Chebacco, Micro-Navigator and so on.
                                                    >
                                                    > I'd be interested in an analysis of whether it adversely affects
                                                    windward performance, and effectively turns a sailing boat into
                                                    a 'motorsailer'.
                                                    >
                                                    > Bill
                                                    >
                                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  • Richard Spelling
                                                    Incidentaly, if you fill a sealed tank with 1000 pounds of water, or 1000 pounds of lead and 0 pounds of air, it will float at the same level... I.E., if you
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Feb 14 1:48 AM
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                                                      Incidentaly, if you fill a sealed tank with 1000 pounds of water, or
                                                      1000 pounds of lead and 0 pounds of air, it will float at the same
                                                      level... I.E., if you put lead in the bottom of your water ballast
                                                      tanks, and then seal them, you do not loose the "unsinkable" factor.

                                                      > useful things like beer... Negative consequence: exit
                                                      > unsinkability. Having wife and five kids makes one think that
                                                      > unsinkability is a good thing. However: It is not a bad thing to
                                                      avoid
                                                      > rot and short life of a precious boat either. Weighing these to
                                                      > factors against eachother requires also emphasis on the
                                                      probability of
                                                      > situations where unsinkability is important... As long as I sail in
                                                      > relativly sheltered waters (Oslo Fjord) I think that "avoiding rot"
                                                      > wins...
                                                      >
                                                    • Bjørn Harbo
                                                      ... That is correct - in theory. My problem was that I had to make BIG openings in the tanks to install the lead pigs. And the space is not useable without
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Feb 14 2:16 AM
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                                                        Richard Spelling wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Incidentaly, if you fill a sealed tank with 1000 pounds of water, or
                                                        > 1000 pounds of lead and 0 pounds of air, it will float at the same
                                                        > level... I.E., if you put lead in the bottom of your water ballast
                                                        > tanks, and then seal them, you do not loose the "unsinkable" factor.

                                                        That is correct - in theory. My problem was that I had to make BIG
                                                        openings in the tanks to "install" the lead pigs. And the space is not
                                                        useable without big, non-sealable openings.
                                                      • Richard Spelling
                                                        I used bomar hatches on the seats and rear decks. You can get them in pretty big sizes, and they are reasonably water tight. Should be able to seal up your
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Feb 14 2:23 AM
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                                                          I used bomar hatches on the seats and rear decks. You can get them
                                                          in pretty big sizes, and they are reasonably water tight. Should be
                                                          able to seal up your tanks/storage area fairly easily.

                                                          How did the leeboard mount repairs go?


                                                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bjørn Harbo <bharbo@o...> wrote:
                                                          > Richard Spelling wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Incidentaly, if you fill a sealed tank with 1000 pounds of
                                                          water, or
                                                          > > 1000 pounds of lead and 0 pounds of air, it will float at the
                                                          same
                                                          > > level... I.E., if you put lead in the bottom of your water
                                                          ballast
                                                          > > tanks, and then seal them, you do not loose the "unsinkable"
                                                          factor.
                                                          >
                                                          > That is correct - in theory. My problem was that I had to make BIG
                                                          > openings in the tanks to "install" the lead pigs. And the space is
                                                          not
                                                          > useable without big, non-sealable openings.
                                                        • Bjørn Harbo
                                                          ... A good idea - on which I should have thought before I messed up the openings. Now the tanks are a perfect scenery for the WDJ chain saw massacre . Far
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Feb 14 2:35 AM
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                                                            Richard Spelling wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            > I used bomar hatches on the seats and rear decks. You can get them
                                                            > in pretty big sizes, and they are reasonably water tight. Should be
                                                            > able to seal up your tanks/storage area fairly easily.
                                                            >
                                                            > How did the leeboard mount repairs go?

                                                            A good idea - on which I should have thought before I messed up the
                                                            openings. Now the tanks are a perfect scenery for "the WDJ chain saw
                                                            massacre". Far beyond repairability...

                                                            I will have to wait till april to repair the leeboard mounts. So far I
                                                            have removed them, and made openings in the seatbacks inside the boats
                                                            to mount the different bits and pieces.
                                                          • jcjglt
                                                            Kjær Bjørn Harbo, Many thanks for this old but very interessant message. I was first interested by a Bolger AS29, then Whalewatcher and now The Jochems
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Oct 25, 2008
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                                                              Kjær Bjørn Harbo,
                                                              Many thanks for this old but very interessant message.
                                                              I was first interested by a Bolger AS29, then Whalewatcher and now The
                                                              Jochems Schooner.
                                                              What do you think of such a boat sailed where I am living : South
                                                              Western Pacific, lagoon of New-Caledonia with 25/35 degrees C,
                                                              tradewinds between 15 and 25kts, crossed waves of 1 to 3 ft, usually a
                                                              maximum of 6ft except when there blows a hurricane but then lowered
                                                              masts must be a good asset ? And the mixed accomodation/cockpit spirit
                                                              looks great.
                                                              Thanks for your feeling.
                                                              Seileren hilsen, jcjglt.

                                                              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bjorn Harbo <bharbo@...> wrote:
                                                              >
                                                              > Hello Group,
                                                              >
                                                              > I have been asked to make a report on my experience with
                                                              > WDJ/Jochems/Family Schooner - the baby seems to have many names. I
                                                              > will try to make it brief (failed) and relevant:
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              > Building
                                                              >
                                                              > As many of you may know from my postings a couple of years ago I
                                                              built
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