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Re: [bolger] Re: Inboard Sneakeasy

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  • Zack Tiger
    Howard: I repowered an old (sic cheap ) houseboat I bought by installing an engine/transaxle combo from a VW rabbit diesel on a well between the two aluminum
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 2, 2004
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      Howard:
      I repowered an old (sic 'cheap') houseboat I bought by
      installing an engine/transaxle combo from a VW rabbit
      diesel on a well between the two aluminum pontoons.
      Instead of welding the gears, I had a spool fabricated
      (also called a "locker" by the circle track boys) to
      tie the two halfshafts together. Instead of
      eliminating the front shaft, I kept it and ran it
      forward to a mounting plate, running in the original
      wheel bearing and hub. this was used to drive
      accessories such as a gnerator, bilge pump, etc.
      While not a lot of time was spent on this (it was
      after all a 'cheapie' exercise, there were some
      technical problems unresolved to my satisfaction when
      I sold the boat:
      1) aux shaft rpm varied with engine speed, which isnt
      so good for generating, pumping etc. I think a torgue
      converter/clutch off a motorcycle or snowmobile would
      help rectify this.
      2) the main drive shaft/support/prop drive was iffyin
      terms of cv jointboot sealing and longevity. Also, do
      to the fact that the strut had to be outboard of the
      cv joint for stability, changing the boot was a pain
      in the @$%. I tried a split boot that used small bolts
      down the side and which could be installed without
      ynaking the whole outboard shaft, but they were not
      reliable.
      3) the low position of the drive shaft in the well box
      made for some real challenges to sealing, and early
      attempts werenot too waterproof. A modified sterndrive
      bellows solved this problem eventually.
      4) on the plus side, fuel economy was incredible, and
      to push that big fat barge with an outboard (she
      originally had a 75hp) would have been prohibitive.
      --- donschultz8275 <donschultz@...> wrote:

      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Howard Stephenson"
      > <stephensonhw@a...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > These days, nearly every 4-cyl. auto engine
      > (except, I think, the
      > > Subaru) is mounted sideways and drive is to the
      > front wheels. Does
      > > this layout make the engines harder to adapt to
      > marine use than the
      > > old way, where the engine is fore-and-aft, with a
      > gearbox behind it
      > > and a propellor shaft connecting the gearbox to
      > the rear wheels
      > > through a differential?
      >
      > Actually a transverse engine/trans combo from any of
      > a large number of
      > cars would make for a very compact drive system
      > because the trans lays
      > alongside rather than behind the engine. This will
      > offset the engine
      > to one side of the center line of the boat, but the
      > weight could be
      > offset by the battery, fuel and other interior
      > design choices.
      >
      > An upside is that your junkyard engine choices range
      > from tiny Korean
      > and Jap vehicles up through a 4.9 liter 200hp+
      > Cadillac of the early
      > 90's Sedan de Ville. You'll need to take the entire
      > wiring harness and
      > computer from the car.
      >
      > It would be necessary to weld the spider gears to
      > lock the
      > differential in any of these engine/trans combos.
      > It's an old stock
      > car racing trick to do this in a fully assembled
      > diff', catching the
      > slag in heavy grease and cleaning it out afterward.
      > One of the
      > half-shafts with its CV joints would connect to the
      > propeller shaft
      > and a plate would need to be made to cover the other
      > half-shaft port.
      >
      > Of course there would be much other work to do on
      > the exhaust, and the
      > cooling circuit. The great majority of engines
      > would be gasoline
      > (petrol) which is nasty stuff in an inboard boat.
      >
      > Also your boat would have to haul around the
      > automotive transmission
      > which will always have more gears and weight than
      > necessary, but you
      > would avoid the cost and work of adapting a "marine"
      > reduction gear to
      > match the prop to the automotive engine rpm.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >




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    • Harry James
      You have any pictures of this conversion? Strikes me as similar to the drive I have seen in the Australian Cat CC29. HJ
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        You have any pictures of this conversion? Strikes me as similar to the
        drive I have seen in the Australian Cat CC29.

        HJ

        Zack Tiger wrote:

        >Howard:
        >I repowered an old (sic 'cheap') houseboat I bought by
        >installing an engine/transaxle combo from a VW rabbit
        >diesel on a well between the two aluminum pontoons.
        >Instead of welding the gears, I had a spool fabricated
        >(also called a "locker" by the circle track boys) to
        >tie the two halfshafts together. Instead of
        >eliminating the front shaft, I kept it and ran it
        >forward to a mounting plate, running in the original
        >wheel bearing and hub. this was used to drive
        >accessories such as a gnerator, bilge pump, etc.
        >While not a lot of time was spent on this (it was
        >after all a 'cheapie' exercise, there were some
        >technical problems unresolved to my satisfaction when
        >I sold the boat:
        >1) aux shaft rpm varied with engine speed, which isnt
        >so good for generating, pumping etc. I think a torgue
        >converter/clutch off a motorcycle or snowmobile would
        >help rectify this.
        >2) the main drive shaft/support/prop drive was iffyin
        >terms of cv jointboot sealing and longevity. Also, do
        >to the fact that the strut had to be outboard of the
        >cv joint for stability, changing the boot was a pain
        >in the @$%. I tried a split boot that used small bolts
        >down the side and which could be installed without
        >ynaking the whole outboard shaft, but they were not
        >reliable.
        >3) the low position of the drive shaft in the well box
        >made for some real challenges to sealing, and early
        >attempts werenot too waterproof. A modified sterndrive
        >bellows solved this problem eventually.
        >4) on the plus side, fuel economy was incredible, and
        >to push that big fat barge with an outboard (she
        >originally had a 75hp) would have been prohibitive.
        >--- donschultz8275 <donschultz@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
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