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Re: bolger's dagger boards

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  • Nels
    ... Was that before or after STORM PETREL? http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm I don t think that there are many designs around with that capability that can
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 1, 2004
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@h...> wrote:
      >> I bet an "A-frame hoist" could also solve the handling problem of
      > the ballasted lee boards on Centenial II, making that boat a much
      > more desirable choice for many. "...the most economical boat
      > that could be called fit to keep the sea in bad weather."
      > From 11 sheets of 3/8" plywood.

      Was that before or after STORM PETREL?

      http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm

      "I don't think that there are many designs around with that
      capability that can be built complete from eight 3/8" x 4' x 8'
      sheets of plywood, and as little else as this one."

      Also I would really love to see a real life "THREE-METER MULTIHULL"
      Page 31 BWAOM. Beautiful little boat but for the twin daggerboards.

      Cheers, Nels
    • Nels
      ... and ... daggerboard ... mounted on the ... to a ... worked very ... winch and ... with no ... Hard for me to visualize...Does the daggerboard raise inside
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 1, 2004
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        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Paul W. Esterle" <pesterle@p...>
        wrote:
        > Can't speak to the problems with a PCB daggerboard but I have owned
        and
        > sailed a 20' Matilda for 15 years. It has a 3/8" steel plate
        daggerboard
        > with a 300 lb. lead bulb on the bottom. A multipart tackle is
        mounted on the
        > inside of the trunk and the top of the daggerboard. The cable leads
        to a
        > winch mounted on the outside of the rear cabin bulkhead. It has
        worked very
        > well with minimum fuss (except for the time I lost control of the
        winch and
        > it lowered itself all the way to the safety stop). I have grounded
        with no
        > problems, the boat just stopped REAL quick!
        >

        Hard for me to visualize...Does the daggerboard raise inside the
        cabin or out? How deep is the board? I thought Matilda's had fixed
        keels. Any photos?

        Cheers, Nels
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... Storm Petrel #337 is essentially a motor sailer, seaworthy and coastal. Centenenial II #332 was designed to be the minimum seaworthy boat, [in therory at
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 1, 2004
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          > Was [Centeniall II] before or after STORM PETREL?

          Storm Petrel #337 is essentially a motor sailer, seaworthy and coastal.

          Centenenial II #332 was designed to be the minimum seaworthy
          boat, [in therory at least], capable to cross the Atlantic
          in reasonable safety (you wouldn't catch me doing it). Oar auxillary.

          http://hallman.org/bolger/Centenial2/

          I bet they were both designed within a month or two of each other.
        • John B. Trussell
          I ve had daggerboards on two Windmills and a Scooner. Both boats had boards of unballasted plywood, and raising/lowering them did not take any great effort.
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 2, 2004
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            I've had daggerboards on two Windmills and a Scooner. Both boats had boards of unballasted plywood, and raising/lowering them did not take any great effort.

            Advantages: the dagger board case is shorter than a centerboard case. It is, therefore, easier to make watertight. The slot is shorter with a dagger board than with a centerboard and a db case is less likely to spit water. Being shorter, a db case takes up less room inside the boat than a cb case. Db cases are often higher (going all the way to the deck line) than cb cases, and this really helps in trying to bail a totally swamped boat (where a cb case will let water in as fast as you bail).

            Disadvantages: When you run aground, either the boat stops really fast and/or you bust the board or possibly spring the db case. Daggerboards stick up above the deck line when raised by the same amount they stick down below the bottom when lowered. This is not a problem with a schooner, but an unexpected jibe with the db up on a sloop rigged boat can be real exciting. And wet. But the boat is easier to bail out afterwords:>)

            When I was contemplating His and Hers Schooners, I thought it might be possible to build teeth into the edge of the daggerboard and use a screw jack to raise and lower it. So long as the project is in a fantasizing stage, it seems like a workable solution...

            John T
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Bruce Hallman
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 4:40 PM
            Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: bolger's dagger boards


            > Was [Centeniall II] before or after STORM PETREL?

            Storm Petrel #337 is essentially a motor sailer, seaworthy and coastal.

            Centenenial II #332 was designed to be the minimum seaworthy
            boat, [in therory at least], capable to cross the Atlantic
            in reasonable safety (you wouldn't catch me doing it). Oar auxillary.

            http://hallman.org/bolger/Centenial2/

            I bet they were both designed within a month or two of each other.


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