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Re: PL Preimum

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  • Donald E. Johnson
    I ve seen so many good reviews of PL Premium that I decided to give it a try. The price is great and the convenience of a strong glue that doesn t require
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 3, 2004
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      I've seen so many good reviews of PL Premium that I decided to give it a try. The
      price is great and the convenience of a strong glue that doesn't require mixing is very
      appealing.

      I used it to glue a piece of quarter inch luan to some half inch ply, on a curve. The
      luan was thus being tortured into shape.

      I put down a nice bead of PL and clamped the luan into position. The clamping was
      set up a bit loose so as not to squeeze out too much of the glue, like I would do for
      epoxy. The next day, I took off the clamps and after a minute or so, the luan
      returned to an almost straight shape, pulling out from the PL. (It was the PL that
      failed, not the ply.)

      I scraped and sanded off the remaining PL, and re-glued the piece with epoxy. I took
      off the clamps this morning and it's solid.

      I also made up a test, just gluing a piece of scrap half inch ply to another. This
      wasn't clamped at all. I just put a thick bead of PL on the end grain of one piece and
      stood it on the other, using a third piece to hold it stable. This also set overnight
      (probably 16-20 hours). It took almost no effort to break this bond. (Hot melt glue
      after about two minutes is stronger.)

      What did I do wrong with the PL? Should this stuff be clamped tightly like yellow
      glue instead of treating it like epoxy? Could I just have a bad tube?


      -Don Johnson
    • b_owen_ca
      I like PL for lots of reasons and in *some* applications I feel it s superior to epoxy. But it isn t epoxy. Having said that... Check the directions on the
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 3, 2004
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        I like PL for lots of reasons and in *some* applications I feel it's
        superior to epoxy. But it isn't epoxy. Having said that...

        Check the directions on the tube and you'll see you need to fit
        pieces together, remove to let the glue outvent (or whatever you call
        it) for 10 minutes or so - a good time to check the gluing surfaces
        for coverage and even contact and make sure there's no starvation -
        then re-ttach with some pressure, clamps or screws. I do a "belt and
        suspenders" with PL and always make sure to have some kind of
        mechanical attachement, if possible. To date I've yet to have a
        functional failure even on non-mechanically fastened pieces.

        As for T fits (say bulkhead to hull side) I would never use PL alone.
        I use drywall tape and do a proper joint just like you do with epoxy.
        If it's well coated - but not overly coated - I've had good results?
        As good as epoxy? Probably not but no failures to date.

        As for your tortured lauan test - if strength in this area is REALLY
        important, I probably wouldn't use just a bead of PL, maybe tape and
        PL.

        In my experience PL needs at least 24 hrs to really harden up, my
        evening gluing is still a bit green the next morning.

        BTW - I don't need to do any "steenking" torture tests, I just built
        a boat out of PL and tortured it.

        Bryant

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Donald E. Johnson" <don@f...> wrote:
        >
        > I've seen so many good reviews of PL Premium that I decided to give
        it a try. The
        > price is great and the convenience of a strong glue that doesn't
        require mixing is very
        > appealing.
        >
        > I used it to glue a piece of quarter inch luan to some half inch
        ply, on a curve. The
        > luan was thus being tortured into shape.
        >
        > I put down a nice bead of PL and clamped the luan into position.
        The clamping was
        > set up a bit loose so as not to squeeze out too much of the glue,
        like I would do for
        > epoxy. The next day, I took off the clamps and after a minute or
        so, the luan
        > returned to an almost straight shape, pulling out from the PL. (It
        was the PL that
        > failed, not the ply.)
        >
        > I scraped and sanded off the remaining PL, and re-glued the piece
        with epoxy. I took
        > off the clamps this morning and it's solid.
        >
        > I also made up a test, just gluing a piece of scrap half inch ply
        to another. This
        > wasn't clamped at all. I just put a thick bead of PL on the end
        grain of one piece and
        > stood it on the other, using a third piece to hold it stable.
        This also set overnight
        > (probably 16-20 hours). It took almost no effort to break this
        bond. (Hot melt glue
        > after about two minutes is stronger.)
        >
        > What did I do wrong with the PL? Should this stuff be clamped
        tightly like yellow
        > glue instead of treating it like epoxy? Could I just have a bad
        tube?
        >
        >
        > -Don Johnson
      • Lincoln Ross
        Make sure all is clean. Only need to clamp lightly. Moisten wood a bit beforehand (this is critical, I think). Let it set for a long time, maybe a week? I like
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 3, 2004
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          Make sure all is clean. Only need to clamp lightly. Moisten wood a bit
          beforehand (this is critical, I think). Let it set for a long time,
          maybe a week? I like PL, but I'm not sure I would use it in a place
          under constant tension as I have had one failure on the end of a
          gunwhale, after a long time. Make sure you are using PL Premium
          Construction Adhesive and not PL 400 or some other weird stuff. I
          understand that the concrete adhesive is ok, but I don't know anything
          about it.

          Lincoln Ross

          >Donald E. Johnson wrote:
          >
          >I've seen so many good reviews of PL Premium that I decided to give it a try. The
          >price is great and the convenience of a strong glue that doesn't require mixing is very
          >appealing.
          >
          >I used it to glue a piece of quarter inch luan to some half inch ply, on a curve. The
          >luan was thus being tortured into shape.
          >
          >I put down a nice bead of PL and clamped the luan into position. The clamping was
          >set up a bit loose so as not to squeeze out too much of the glue, like I would do for
          >epoxy. The next day, I took off the clamps and after a minute or so, the luan
          >returned to an almost straight shape, pulling out from the PL. (It was the PL that
          >failed, not the ply.)
          >snip
          >What did I do wrong with the PL? Should this stuff be clamped tightly like yellow
          >glue instead of treating it like epoxy? Could I just have a bad tube?
          >
          >
          >-Don Johnson
          >
        • juan negron
          Here in Spain we don´t have the same brands as you have, so I haven´t had a chance to try PL premium, but I have used other polyutethane glues. The one I
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 4, 2004
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            Here in Spain we don´t have the same brands as you have, so I haven´t
            had a chance to try PL premium, but I have used other polyutethane
            glues.

            The one I have used most extensively is Quilosa 1K ( monocomponent)
            exterior / marine polyurethane glue.

            While it does a fine job, I have found that in places where I had
            glued a wood part to a ply sheet, the swelling of the wood started to
            crack the glue joint.

            This was under the waterline areas of a dry sailed boat, where the
            wood absorbed more water through the paint. It was painted with a
            water based exterior acrylic paint that "regulates moisture". I guess
            the ply only absorbs up to the first glue layer, while the wood will
            take in a lot more.

            This particular glue foams where it runs out, so i imagine it will
            also do so in the joint, where I don´t think it helps any.

            This glue is fast. 2 Hrs. for handling, 12 Hrs. for strength, 24 for
            full cure. It is convenient, easy to use.

            OTOH, it is more expensive than epoxy, less strong and durable, and
            has a shelf life of 8 months.

            I guess it is a question of carefully choosing application parameters.

            Juan.
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