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Re: long micro/Chebaccos

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  • Nels
    ... the ... anybody ... It gets a little difficult to compare because of the several different CHEBACCO designs, including the off-shore version which I am
    Message 1 of 32 , Sep 1, 2004
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      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, juan negron <juan.negron@g...> wrote:
      >>
      > I would too. To me the chebaccos ( and the schooners) are some of
      the
      > most enchanting boats from PB. That said, Chebaccos seems to have a
      > lot less interior volume per foot length than the Micros. Does
      anybody
      > have numbers?
      >
      > Juan.

      It gets a little difficult to compare because of the several
      different CHEBACCO designs, including the off-shore version which I
      am told has a lot of interior space. I think the square boats gain by
      about 25% in the interiors.

      The regular plywood CHEBACCO has a displacement of 1740 pounds and
      the regular MICRO is 1650 pounds. Yet the CHEBACCO is 3 1/2 feet
      longer and 1 1/2 feet wider. The CHEBACCO 25 and LONG MICRO compare
      about the same with at 2350 for the CHEBACCO and 2450 for LM. Yet the
      25 footer is almost 6 feet longer and 2 feet wider.

      Then you also have the intrusion of the C/B case with some of the
      CHEBACCO'S and they are not quite as stable at anchor. You are losing
      mostly the volume and stability of the square cross-section compared
      to the multi-chine which is more "tiddly at anchor" according Bolger.

      Despite the beam increase, the CHEBACCOS may be easier to launch and
      retrieve as the topsides clear the fenders of the trailer.

      The CHEBACCO MOTORSAILER version has no centerboard case but a keel,
      much like the MICROS - giving a nice open cabin with bench high
      bunks. The lines of the 25 footer are to die for, with a well that
      mostly hides the outboard, an aluminum plate centerboard and a
      shallow keel with what appears to be a "bulb" fairing on each side
      and the ability to "plane cleanly with a 15-h.p. motor at low
      cruising rpm". This would be a beautiful river/tidal estuary boat and
      with the addition of a "Roger Derby" hard dodger, would be a neat
      long distance cruiser. But the lack of interior cabin space, does not
      make it feasible to live aboard for long I would guess. It could
      easily be built strip fashion as well, although the lapstrake version
      would be beautiful.

      When I was in Scandinavia in June/July I saw many small lapstrake
      cruisers with sturdy wooden pilothouses all finished bright. Watching
      these gems slipping past, under sail or with a small diesel running,
      (Or both!) are images difficult to erase. A Chebacco 25 would fit
      right in, although the chopped off stern would not - the Scandy boats
      are almost all double-enders with great huge, compound bends in the
      aft strakes!

      Cheers, Nels
    • Rod Cahill
      Hi Pat, I am currently building a Micro and I have the mast to set in the bough like your long Micro. You can see photos of my boat at Rods Micro in the
      Message 32 of 32 , Dec 31, 2010
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        Hi Pat,
        I am currently building a Micro and I have the mast to set in the bough like your long Micro. You can see photos of my boat at "Rods Micro" in the discussion group photos. I have yet to decide exactly how I am going to mount the mast fitting. Could you please send me some closer, more detailed photos of the SS fitting plus details on the fitting you pull up to keep the foot of the mast in place.
         
        Thanks,
         
        Rod Cahill
        Bowning
        Australia
           


        From: Pat <patjah@...>
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, 31 December, 2010 2:29:24 PM
        Subject: [bolger] long micro



        I build a Long Micro last year. It took 6months full time (taking our time to do it right) 2 people. I think the cost was approx 9000us including sails ect. I don’t think boat building on this scale is a good idea for someone who has not worked for sometime with epoxies. Epoxies sound simple to use but they are not and if you make a mistake in say the sheathing of hull or laminating the keel it can be a very expensive mistake.  If you start with a smaller boat and make a mistake (which may take a few years to become apparent) it is not a big deal. I guess it depends on ones motivation for building if it is worth the risk. But many things can go wrong and many, many amateur boats are never completed.

         

        I have some pics of the boat here http://picasaweb.google.com/patjah/MyBolgerLongMicro02#

         

        Cheers

        Happy boat building




         
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