Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [bolger] Digest Number 2068 - xylene and CPES

Expand Messages
  • Court Gettel
    I have two comments about xylene and CPES. I think xylene is the chemical I read about awhile back that was frighteningly toxic. If it is, you do NOT want to
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2004
      I have two comments about xylene and CPES.

      I think xylene is the chemical I read about awhile back that was frighteningly toxic. If it is, you do NOT want to get any on you at any cost at any time for any reason. It is DEFINITELY worth doing some research about.

      I have an old boat which had a lot of core rot between layers of fibergalss. luckily for me, I was put onto a site called The Rot Doctor. (www.rotdoc.com) He sells CPES. It's not "generic" epoxy plus a lot of solvent. The resin is wood-derived, not petroleum, and consequently bonds much better with wood. Furthermore, it penetrates about 4 times as deeply as the next-best product, under test. I doubt you could match it with a home brew. The other nice thing about The Rot Doctor is that he will answer, thoroughly and well, any questions you email him in less than 24 hours, and he won't stop answering until you stop asking. I suggest you see what he has to say about it before you go through a lot of work for a less-than-good result. I have been using CPES abundantly and have found it to be every bit as good as claimed.

      Regards -

      Court

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, grant corson wrote:
      > Doug, I never heard of xylene, is that something available at a
      hardware
      > store? Sounds great

      Xylene is available at most paint stores. It is one of the ingredients
      in automotive paint reducers. I mention xylene specifically because it
      seems to have the least ill effects on epoxy strength.

      Many other solvents work just as well if all you want to do is make a
      penetrating epoxy. Methyl or denatured alcohol, acetone or just about
      any automotive paint reducer will work fine. I use acrylic enamel
      reducer because I have several gallons stashed away.

      Those of you who were on some of the old egroups boat lists remember a
      product called CPES (clear penetrating epoxy sealant). It had such a
      religous following that to suggest the possibility of making it
      yourself got you verbally assaulted. Turns out it was just generic
      epoxy with about 40% solvent added. The guy made a killing for a few
      years. Can't blame him for that but the CPES cult was reminiscent of
      Wharram catamaran groupies. Weird!

      Doug






      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage!

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Burrill
      ... Xylene is a mixture of three closely related compounds: 1,2- 1,3- and 1,4-dimethylbenzene. It s a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon, similar to toluene
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2004
        Court Gettel wrote:

        > I think xylene is the chemical I read about awhile back that was frighteningly toxic. If it is, you do NOT want to get any on you at any cost at any time for any reason. It is DEFINITELY worth doing some research about.

        Xylene is a mixture of three closely related compounds: 1,2- 1,3- and
        1,4-dimethylbenzene.

        It's a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon, similar to toluene
        (methylbenzene), or benzene.

        I wouldn't describe it as frighteningly toxic (reserving that for things
        like plutonium salts or cone shell venom), with the proper precautions
        (well ventilated working area, gloves, coveralls, goggles, no smoking or
        naked flames) it sohuld be possible to work perfectly safely with it,
        especially since those are the kind of precautions I'd take for working
        with large quantities of epoxy, glass fibre, and wood anyway. The
        biggest dangers from xylene are breathing large quantities of vapours in
        a confined space, and setting light to the vapours. I'd actually be more
        worried about having somewhere suitable to store it in any quantity
        (more than a couple of litres), than actually using the stuff.

        Here are a couple of pages with more information:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylene

        http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/tfacts71.html

        Pretty much anything you use to build a boat will have the potential to
        cause health problems, but most of the time they only require a few
        simple precautions to ensure that problems can be avoided. Whenever I
        contemplate using a particular material or method of construction,
        safety always gets some thought, as I intend to complete my project
        whilst retaining all of my fingers, both of my eyes, and as many of my
        mental faculties as I possessed at the start.

        Dan
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.