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Idaho: million questions

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  • Grupos
    Hello all! I am planning the first steps in the building of the Idaho. Unfortunately for me (and you :) I have lots of questions about Idaho and in general. -
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
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      Hello all! I am planning the first steps in the building of the Idaho.
      Unfortunately for me (and you :) I have lots of questions about Idaho and in
      general.


      - Is there any Idaho built besides Bernard Wolfard, any website or email?

      - Why there are lots of Sneakeasy, Diablo, a few Topaz-Tenesse, etc and it
      seams to be only one Idaho? What are the problems with this design?

      - I am planning to build it outdoor. What do you recomend for the floor and
      a temporaly ceiling?

      - How many people or weight do you think Idaho would carry safely?

      - Chine logs: is it the same to use one 2x2" than to laminate two 1x2"?
      Similar question for gunwales.


      Stay tuned, more questions in the near future. Thanks in advance for your
      help. Regards, Máximo.
    • Bruce Hallman
      The Idaho is different, I am guessing, because of a dispute about ownership of the rights to sell the plans. Much of the real world is not on the Internet, so
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
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        The Idaho is different, I am guessing, because
        of a dispute about ownership of the rights to
        sell the plans. Much of the real world is not on
        the Internet, so I bet that several have been built.

        The safety of any boat has as much to do with
        the common sense of the person operating the
        boat as it has with the design of the boat.

        Idaho is a 'flat water' kind of boat, not an open
        ocean boat, ideal for rivers and estuaries.

        Bernie Wolfard lived in Portland Oregon at the
        time that Bolger designed the boat, with the
        waters to be use being up and down the
        Columbia River, which is perhaps a mile wide
        and two hundred miles long, very windy at times
        too.

        The reason that the chine logs and gunwales
        are laminated is to make their bending easier
        [possible]. Be aware that in the USA a
        1x2 piece of wood is actually 3/4" x 1 1/2",
        not literally 1"x2". The straight parts of the
        boat could be made with 2x2, but at the curves
        you will have to use 1x2 (I predict).

        Also notice that Bolger has a "V" drip groove
        in the outer laminated gunwale, which he achieves
        by ripping the corner off of the two 1x2 laminations.
      • chodges31711
        ... I think the width has something to do with it too. You can not put a lot in 55 inches of inside width. Two chairs leave no room to pass. 31 feet is a lot
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 1, 2004
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          > The Idaho is different, I am guessing, because
          > of a dispute about ownership of the rights to
          > sell the plans. Much of the real world is not on
          > the Internet, so I bet that several have been built.

          I think the width has something to do with it too. You can not put a
          lot in 55 inches of inside width. Two chairs leave no room to pass.
          31 feet is a lot of boat but without the space of a big boat. Idaho
          is primarily a day boat or picnic boat with primitive overnight
          possibilities. Tennessee, at 6 foot wide, is more popular and easier
          to fit with a efficient floor plan.

          >
          > The reason that the chine logs and gunwales
          > are laminated is to make their bending easier
          > [possible]. Be aware that in the USA a
          > 1x2 piece of wood is actually 3/4" x 1 1/2",
          > not literally 1"x2". The straight parts of the
          > boat could be made with 2x2, but at the curves
          > you will have to use 1x2 (I predict).

          Also two laminated pieces let you use wood with some imperfections
          and splices. A weak place (knot) will only go through half way and
          not all the way through like with a solid piece.

          I like the Idaho and plan to build one but I plan to use it as a
          daytime picnic cruiser. I like the narrow width for trailering.

          Actually I plan to build an Idaho Clam Skiff. The length and shape of
          Idaho with the newer design shoe, higher sheer and stand up cabin top
          of Clam Skiff. PCB said the shoe, the cabin and even the square
          transom of Clam Skiff should work well on Idaho if desired.

          Charles
        • Peter Lenihan
          ... floor and ... It all depends,I guess,on the area where you live and what is available.If you can get outdoor space,you may wish to try a bowshed.Click
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 2, 2004
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Grupos <grupos@p...> wrote:
            > - I am planning to build it outdoor. What do you recomend for the
            floor and
            > a temporaly ceiling?

            It all depends,I guess,on the area where you live and what is
            available.If you can get outdoor space,you may wish to try a
            bowshed.Click here for some photos of what I'm talking about
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bolger3/files/WINDERMERE/
            It is the best thing I have done to help cope with outdoor building
            conditions and wish I had built it earlier on!

            > - Chine logs: is it the same to use one 2x2" than to laminate two
            1x2"?
            > Similar question for gunwales.

            If you can have ready access to full dimensioned lumber,then you do
            not really need to laminate.The curves are gentle enough to not need
            laminating.The chine logs on WINDERMERE are mahogany, 1 and 3
            quarter inch square, and they went in(on?) without much effort.Same
            will apply to sheer clamps or gunwales.

            Good luck with your project,if you do go ahead and build one....and
            don't forget to take photos,lots of them :-)


            Sincerely,

            Peter Lenihan
          • donschultz8275
            ... a ... easier to fit with a efficient floor plan. ... I agree w your analysis. I was thinking of Idaho, but concluded a 30 + boat with Idaho s set of
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 4, 2004
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              > I think the width has something to do with it too. You can not put
              a
              > lot in 55 inches of inside width. Two chairs leave no room to pass.
              > 31 feet is a lot of boat but without the space of a big boat. Idaho
              > is primarily a day boat or picnic boat with primitive overnight
              > possibilities. Tennessee, at 6 foot wide, is more popular and
              easier to fit with a efficient floor plan.
              >

              I agree w' your analysis. I was thinking of Idaho, but concluded a
              30'+ boat with Idaho's set of attributes just didn't suit my needs.
              If I'm going to trailer 30'+ around anyway, the boat should have more
              capability as a camper, and load carrier. Of course each should make
              their own analysis/decision.

              IMO Idaho would be a fun bargain as a gentleman's speedboat as Bolger
              suggested for Topaz Spyder. She could be decked over, clad w'
              mohoghany like thin ply, and finished bright. Essentially a more
              substantial Sneakeasy.

              Your thought to add a Clam Skiff "shoe" makes much sense to me. When
              I posted a pic of Idaho with a stand up cabin, some questioned the
              wisdom of to much wind catching cabin wall. I've had in mind to
              build Clam Skiff but stretch it one sheet of plywood to 22'+. Your
              thought is better.

              One real attraction of the Idaho is the simplicity/size factor.
              Idaho is a very simple boat relative to her size. Keeping the hp
              down is part of the simplicity. She doesn't need a lot of complex
              bottom stiffening joiner work w' 25 hp and less.
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