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Re: [bolger] Re: Treating Plywood for checking

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  • Jeff
    Plain old de-natured alcohol will work as well. At least with the RAKA epoxy, it only takes about 10% to maybe 15% alcohol to get it thin like water. Jeff ...
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 28, 2004
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      Plain old de-natured alcohol will work as well. At least with the RAKA epoxy, it only takes about 10% to maybe 15% alcohol to get it thin like water.

      Jeff
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: doug6949
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 28, 2004 2:03 PM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Treating Plywood for checking


      By thinning epoxy with xylene you can get wood to suck it up like a
      sponge. I recently did this with some shelves for a kitchen cabinet.
      They look like oil rubbed natural wood but are hard like plastic.

      Using 30-40% xylene, the epoxy becomes as thin as water. If you use a
      very slow hardener at low working temperature it is possible to soak
      the wood for several hours.

      Doug

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@u...> wrote:
      SNIP
      >
      > The second is to fill up the pores of the wood, discouraging
      entrance of
      > solid water or humidity. This is done with some kind of coating,
      and
      > apparently Penetrol is one possibility. The classic method is a
      series of
      > coatings, starting with linseed oil (unboiled!) and solvent, then
      more
      > linseed oil, and finishing your last coat with boild linseed oil.
      > This is what I recommend.




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    • grant corson
      Doug, I never heard of xylene, is that something available at a hardware store? Sounds great Grant
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 28, 2004
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        Doug, I never heard of xylene, is that something available at a hardware
        store? Sounds great
        Grant

        on 6/28/04 4:03 PM, doug6949 at prototype@... wrote:

        > By thinning epoxy with xylene you can get wood to suck it up like a
        > sponge. I recently did this with some shelves for a kitchen cabinet.
        > They look like oil rubbed natural wood but are hard like plastic.
        >
        > Using 30-40% xylene, the epoxy becomes as thin as water. If you use a
        > very slow hardener at low working temperature it is possible to soak
        > the wood for several hours.
        >
        > Doug
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@u...> wrote:
        > SNIP
        >>
        >> The second is to fill up the pores of the wood, discouraging
        > entrance of
        >> solid water or humidity. This is done with some kind of coating,
        > and
        >> apparently Penetrol is one possibility. The classic method is a
        > series of
        >> coatings, starting with linseed oil (unboiled!) and solvent, then
        > more
        >> linseed oil, and finishing your last coat with boild linseed oil.
        >> This is what I recommend.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
        > (978) 282-1349
        > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • chodges31711
        It is a paint thinner or vehicle for certain industrial enamels. A paint store should have it. ... hardware
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 30, 2004
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          It is a paint thinner or vehicle for certain industrial enamels. A
          paint store should have it.

          > Doug, I never heard of xylene, is that something available at a
          hardware
          > store? Sounds great
          > Grant
        • doug6949
          ... hardware ... Xylene is available at most paint stores. It is one of the ingredients in automotive paint reducers. I mention xylene specifically because it
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 30, 2004
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, grant corson <corson@a...> wrote:
            > Doug, I never heard of xylene, is that something available at a
            hardware
            > store? Sounds great

            Xylene is available at most paint stores. It is one of the ingredients
            in automotive paint reducers. I mention xylene specifically because it
            seems to have the least ill effects on epoxy strength.

            Many other solvents work just as well if all you want to do is make a
            penetrating epoxy. Methyl or denatured alcohol, acetone or just about
            any automotive paint reducer will work fine. I use acrylic enamel
            reducer because I have several gallons stashed away.

            Those of you who were on some of the old egroups boat lists remember a
            product called CPES (clear penetrating epoxy sealant). It had such a
            religous following that to suggest the possibility of making it
            yourself got you verbally assaulted. Turns out it was just generic
            epoxy with about 40% solvent added. The guy made a killing for a few
            years. Can't blame him for that but the CPES cult was reminiscent of
            Wharram catamaran groupies. Weird!

            Doug
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