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[bolger] Cutting a birdsmouth

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  • monica@chairlady.com
    I ve been planning to use the birdsmouth method of mast making for a few years now on my Catfish since I read an article on this method way back in MAIB.
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 26, 1999
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      I've been planning to use the "birdsmouth" method of mast making for a
      few years now on my Catfish since I read an article on this method way
      back in MAIB. True, after a fine start the project has been stalled
      since '95 and only recently rekindled, but one can't let all that
      planning (not to mention a near full set of pre-fabed bulkheads) go to
      waste, can one?

      Anyway, when I get to cutting these shapes my method of choice would be
      to get one of those big 90° "veining" router bits for my hand router,
      and fit the bottom plate with two pins across a diagonal. That way by
      twisting the router (hence the pins too) into the work the router would
      jig itself to the center of the workpiece, and I could work my way to
      the proper depth in several passes. True, this method would waste a
      about the router's base diameter (half either end of the stock) before
      the cut centered out, but thats close enough for me.

      I've never been able to get saw cuts to meet at the bottom of anything,
      even using a tenon saw to cut decorative knotches in fence posts so I
      like the idea of using a cuter that already has the right shape built
      in.

      Any other thoughts on skinning this cat?
    • manta@localline.com
      monic.....do you have a table saw and dado blade?... if so set the blade a 45degrees .. make sure to use fingerboards to hold in place.( lots of them) you
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 27, 1999
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        monic.....do you have a table saw and dado blade?... if so set the
        blade a 45degrees .. make sure to use fingerboards to hold in place.(
        lots of them) you should be able to set the corner of one side of dado
        blade as the point of the "V"... make sure to use a couple of push
        sticks!!!!! .... Chris
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=371
        > I've been planning to use the "birdsmouth" method of mast making for a
        > few years now on my Catfish since I read an article on this method way
        > back in MAIB. True, after a fine start the project has been stalled
        > since '95 and only recently rekindled, but one can't let all that
        > planning (not to mention a near full set of pre-fabed bulkheads) go to
        > waste, can one?
        >
        > Anyway, when I get to cutting these shapes my method of choice would
        be
        > to get one of those big 90° "veining" router bits for my hand router,
        > and fit the bottom plate with two pins across a diagonal. That way by
        > twisting the router (hence the pins too) into the work the router
        would
        > jig itself to the center of the workpiece, and I could work my way to
        > the proper depth in several passes. True, this method would waste a
        > about the router's base diameter (half either end of the stock) before
        > the cut centered out, but thats close enough for me.
        >
        > I've never been able to get saw cuts to meet at the bottom of
        anything,
        > even using a tenon saw to cut decorative knotches in fence posts so I
        > like the idea of using a cuter that already has the right shape built
        > in.
        >
        > Any other thoughts on skinning this cat?
        >
      • rlundy@atlantic.net
        Hmmm, those are two pretty good ideas for cutting the bird s mouth. I was planning on using the table saw like they did in the article. Of course, that
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 28, 1999
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          Hmmm, those are two pretty good ideas for cutting the bird's mouth. I
          was planning on using the table saw like they did in the article. Of
          course, that workshop looked incredible with all the LONG formica
          covered infeed, outfeed and layup tables.

          The router idea seems great. But why use the dowel pins? Most routers
          can be accessorized with an edge guide, for a small cost. Have you
          found the router bits to use yet? For my mast, I would need one that's
          about 3/4 at its widest point. Let me know if you've found veining
          bits that large. I love my router, but am intimidated as hell by all
          the bits out there.

          As far as dadoing, I hadn't thought of this; Am afraid removal of that
          much material with my cheap wobble dado blade would take forever.
          Anyone else tried this?

          Robert Lundy

          mant-@... wrote:
          original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=372
          > monic.....do you have a table saw and dado blade?... if so set the
          > blade a 45degrees .. make sure to use fingerboards to hold in place.(
          > lots of them) you should be able to set the corner of one side of dado
          > blade as the point of the "V"... make sure to use a couple of push
          > sticks!!!!! .... Chris
          > original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=371
          > > I've been planning to use the "birdsmouth" method of mast making
          for a
          > > few years now on my Catfish since I read an article on this method
          way
          > > back in MAIB. True, after a fine start the project has been stalled
          > > since '95 and only recently rekindled, but one can't let all that
          > > planning (not to mention a near full set of pre-fabed bulkheads) go
          to
          > > waste, can one?
          > >
          > > Anyway, when I get to cutting these shapes my method of choice would
          > be
          > > to get one of those big 90° "veining" router bits for my hand
          router,
          > > and fit the bottom plate with two pins across a diagonal. That way
          by
          > > twisting the router (hence the pins too) into the work the router
          > would
          > > jig itself to the center of the workpiece, and I could work my way
          to
          > > the proper depth in several passes. True, this method would waste a
          > > about the router's base diameter (half either end of the stock)
          before
          > > the cut centered out, but thats close enough for me.
          > >
          > > I've never been able to get saw cuts to meet at the bottom of
          > anything,
          > > even using a tenon saw to cut decorative knotches in fence posts so
          I
          > > like the idea of using a cuter that already has the right shape
          built
          > > in.
          > >
          > > Any other thoughts on skinning this cat?
          > >
          >
        • monica@chairlady.com
          ... routers ... I never really trusted edge guides. Very hard to set up dead center. And you can only set them so tight then they wander, and while I m routing
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 3, 1999
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            > The router idea seems great. But why use the dowel pins? Most
            routers
            > can be accessorized with an edge guide, for a small cost. Have you
            > found the router bits to use yet?

            I never really trusted edge guides. Very hard to set up dead center.
            And you can only set them so tight then they wander, and while I'm
            routing I like putting lots of pressure in the direction that aligns
            things. The pins make the base self-align to any width piece (even one
            that tapers), and can't sneak off-center and destroy my workpiece.

            I believe I saw appropiate bits at a Sears (the smaller satalite
            "Men's" stores with just the good stuff and no clothes). I'll check
            again next time I'm there. Woodworkers Warehouse would be another place
            to spend a nice hour or two wandering thru "just to look."
          • Robert N. Lundy
            Hmmm... I just purchased the edge guide for my router and haven had a chance to really use it. After reading your post I took a look at it. It looks really
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 3, 1999
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              Hmmm... I just purchased the edge guide for my router and haven had a
              chance to really use it. After reading your post I took a look at it. It
              looks really sturdy and even has a very fine adjustment mechanism on it.
              But your post makes a lot of sense, especially with the variation in
              routers. A cool tool, but rather confusing with the number accessories.

              The idea of cutting the bird's mouth with the router is still one to pursue.
              I'm going to start looking for a 3/4 veining bit on my next trip to Home
              Depot.

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: monica@... [mailto:monica@...]
              > Sent: 03 October, 1999 3:26 AM
              > To: bolger@egroups.com
              > Subject: [bolger] Re: Cutting a birdsmouth
              >
              >
              > > The router idea seems great. But why use the dowel pins? Most
              > routers
              > > can be accessorized with an edge guide, for a small cost. Have you
              > > found the router bits to use yet?
              >
              > I never really trusted edge guides. Very hard to set up dead center.
              > And you can only set them so tight then they wander, and while I'm
              > routing I like putting lots of pressure in the direction that aligns
              > things. The pins make the base self-align to any width piece (even one
              > that tapers), and can't sneak off-center and destroy my workpiece.
              >
              > I believe I saw appropiate bits at a Sears (the smaller satalite
              > "Men's" stores with just the good stuff and no clothes). I'll check
              > again next time I'm there. Woodworkers Warehouse would be another place
              > to spend a nice hour or two wandering thru "just to look."
              >
              >
              >
              >
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