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Re: [bolger] Chebacco building space, was Japanese Beach Cruiser

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  • Roger Derby
    Not being able to go easily from one side to the other would be a daunting prospect for me. By adding parts symmetrically, one balances the stresses on the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 25, 2004
      Not being able to go easily from one side to the other would be a daunting
      prospect for me. By adding parts symmetrically, one balances the stresses
      on the strongback and reduces the likelyhood of building a banana.

      One can get a lot done by building modules first (see
      http://derbyrm.mystarband.net/Chebacco.html and
      http://derbyrm.mystarband.net/Dayawl.html ) but it requires extra care (and
      jigging) to make each true, and eventually you get to the strongback stage.
      Maybe you could wait until the modules were ready and then
      lease/borrow/steal space for the final assembly?

      Roger
      derbyrm@...
      derbyrm.mystarband.net/default.htm

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Dan Burrill" <dan@...>

      > I'd been set on building a Chebacco 20 for a while now, and will soon
      > have just about enough room. (When I say 'just about', I've been
      > considering a way of making the strongback so I can slide it from side
      > to side to work on different sides of the boat, so it's tight). However,
      > this is going to be the first time I've built a boat, and I'm conscious
      > of not biting off more than I can chew.
    • Dan Burrill
      ... That s why I was looking at ways of moving the strongback with the boat on it. I ll have a space 25 long and 12 wide (with a bit off to the side where
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 25, 2004
        Roger Derby wrote:

        > Not being able to go easily from one side to the other would be a daunting
        > prospect for me. By adding parts symmetrically, one balances the stresses
        > on the strongback and reduces the likelyhood of building a banana.

        That's why I was looking at ways of moving the strongback with the boat
        on it. I'll have a space 25' long and 12' wide (with a bit off to the
        side where I'll have a shed for tools, supplies, etc). I figure there's
        not enough room to work comfortably on both sides of the boat at once,
        though I could do so at a pinch.

        The two options I'd considered both involved building the strongback
        from a frame of 100mm x 100mm wooden fence posts or steel scaffolding
        poles. I was then going to either mount runners on the bottom of the
        strongback to run in greased channels, or get hold of a couple of the
        jacks used for moving snooker and pool tables, and bolt them to the
        bottom of the strongback, with short legs to take the weight of
        strongback and boat at rest. The goal is to enable me to push (or pull)
        the boat about a foot in either direction, to give me three feet of
        clearance on the side I'm currently working on. Depending on how
        difficult it is, I might rig up a couple of pulleys attached to the
        walls on either side to make the job easier.

        > One can get a lot done by building modules first (see
        > http://derbyrm.mystarband.net/Chebacco.html and
        > http://derbyrm.mystarband.net/Dayawl.html ) but it requires extra care (and
        > jigging) to make each true, and eventually you get to the strongback stage.
        > Maybe you could wait until the modules were ready and then
        > lease/borrow/steal space for the final assembly?

        Building modules is definitely an option, as I've probably got just
        enough room to do the final assembly on site, though it'd be tight.
        Renting space in a boatshed is also an option, but not one I can afford
        right now, and I'd like to build the boat somewhere close to home as I
        don't drive at the moment.

        In the short term, I've decided to build a smaller boat, and then I can
        go sailing whilst I ponder how best to solve the problems of building a
        larger boat.

        Dan
      • Roger Derby
        The risky part in a strongback that isn t part of the building is that I tend to take short cuts; use inferior lumber, bad joints, no glue, etc. If you make
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 25, 2004
          The risky part in a strongback that isn't part of the building is that I
          tend to take short cuts; use inferior lumber, bad joints, no glue, etc. If
          you make it massive and put in lots of triangles (diagonals and gussets) it
          should work. You'll need to be able to lock it in each position so that you
          can push and pull against it without getting run over.

          I hope your 25' length includes a door at the end for bringing in long stuff
          and swinging the cat.

          Roger
          derbyrm@...
          derbyrm.mystarband.net/default.htm

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Dan Burrill" <dan@...>


          > Roger Derby wrote:
          >
          > > Not being able to go easily from one side to the other would be a
          daunting
          > > prospect for me. By adding parts symmetrically, one balances the
          stresses
          > > on the strongback and reduces the likelyhood of building a banana.
          >
          > That's why I was looking at ways of moving the strongback with the boat
          > on it. I'll have a space 25' long and 12' wide (with a bit off to the
          > side where I'll have a shed for tools, supplies, etc). I figure there's
          > not enough room to work comfortably on both sides of the boat at once,
          > though I could do so at a pinch.
          >
          > The two options I'd considered both involved building the strongback
          > from a frame of 100mm x 100mm wooden fence posts or steel scaffolding
          > poles. I was then going to either mount runners on the bottom of the
          > strongback to run in greased channels, or get hold of a couple of the
          > jacks used for moving snooker and pool tables, and bolt them to the
          > bottom of the strongback, with short legs to take the weight of
          > strongback and boat at rest. The goal is to enable me to push (or pull)
          > the boat about a foot in either direction, to give me three feet of
          > clearance on the side I'm currently working on. Depending on how
          > difficult it is, I might rig up a couple of pulleys attached to the
          > walls on either side to make the job easier.
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