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[bolger] First Steps

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  • Robert N. Lundy
    Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was the sweeping curves in
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 26, 1999
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      Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
      Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was the
      sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales, etc a
      little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood are REAL
      long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the passenger
      window and the back end. Pretty funny.

      Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of plywood.
      Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of neat,
      you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and varieties
      of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18 feet.
      So I ended up with:

      1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
      2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
      2 16 ft clear fir 1X6

      Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
      shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really didn't
      expect to find without going to a specialty store and special ordering the
      long lenghths.

      If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least attempt
      to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth mast
      making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my portable
      table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and outfeed.
      For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of 1.137
      which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr. Bell's
      account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought I'd at
      least give this a try. Any advice.

      I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over cedar 4x4
      from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw up by 1/8
      on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.

      As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some pics on
      my web area.

      Robert & Amy Lundy
      St. Peterburg, Fla.
      rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
      rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
      727-526-9329
      727-528-8104 FAX
    • david
      Robert, In reply to your parenthetical (and possibly rhetorical) question, cedar dust can indeed be dangerous. Rot resistant woods such as cedar, teak, and
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 27, 1999
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        Robert,
        In reply to your parenthetical (and possibly rhetorical) question, cedar dust
        can indeed be dangerous. Rot resistant woods such as cedar, teak, and mahogany,
        and yes, even humble luan (which is actually a few different species of cedar)
        owe their resistance, at least in part, to naturally occurring toxins produced
        by the tree. These toxins can trigger allergic or sensitive reactions in
        susceptible individuals. The most serious reactions involve inhaling the saw and
        sanding dust, so one should always wear a mask when performing dust-producing
        operations on these woods (or anything else, for that matter). Some people can
        get skin rashes just from handling the wood, but such reactions are usually
        self-limiting. I'm not suggesting you get hysterical, just be aware of the
        problem, and, of course, wear your dust mask. As for the rest of your post,
        boatbuilding is a funny thing. Everything takes twice as long and cost three
        times what you thought it would. Oh, well.... I have no advice concerning the
        ripping of bird's mouths. My little tablesaw and I manage those sort of cuts
        without trouble. I usually screw up by confusing mirror image pieces like hull
        and cabin sides. I've taken to just using marine plywood because both sides of
        the stuff are good and I can salvage some of my mistakes. Of course, if I
        thought really hard before I started, maybe I wouldn't make such mistakes. If I
        thought really hard, however, maybe I would realize the folly of building boats
        in the first place and just give it up. What fun would that be?
        david
        Btw, I enjoyed your post and look forward to your continued adventure in
        boatbuilding.

        Robert N. Lundy wrote:

        > Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
        > Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was the
        > sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales, etc a
        > little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood are REAL
        > long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the passenger
        > window and the back end. Pretty funny.
        >
        > Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of plywood.
        > Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of neat,
        > you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and varieties
        > of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18 feet.
        > So I ended up with:
        >
        > 1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
        > 2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
        > 2 16 ft clear fir 1X6
        >
        > Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
        > shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really didn't
        > expect to find without going to a specialty store and special ordering the
        > long lenghths.
        >
        > If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least attempt
        > to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth mast
        > making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my portable
        > table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and outfeed.
        > For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of 1.137
        > which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr. Bell's
        > account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought I'd at
        > least give this a try. Any advice.
        >
        > I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over cedar 4x4
        > from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw up by 1/8
        > on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.
        >
        > As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some pics on
        > my web area.
        >
        > Robert & Amy Lundy
        > St. Peterburg, Fla.
        > rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
        > rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
        > 727-526-9329
        > 727-528-8104 FAX
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger
        > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
      • Michael Jennings
        ... I also went with a solid mast on my Windsprint and have not found it to be a problem to manage. I laminated two 16 fir 2 X4 s, originally 2 X6 s, cut
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 27, 1999
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          Robert N. Lundy wrote:
          >
          > Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
          > Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was the
          > sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales, etc a
          > little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood are REAL
          > long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the passenger
          > window and the back end. Pretty funny.
          >
          > Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of plywood.
          > Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of neat,
          > you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and varieties
          > of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18 feet.
          > So I ended up with:
          >
          > 1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
          > 2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
          > 2 16 ft clear fir 1X6
          >
          > Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
          > shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really didn't
          > expect to find without going to a specialty store and special ordering the
          > long lenghths.
          >
          > If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least attempt
          > to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth mast
          > making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my portable
          > table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and outfeed.
          > For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of 1.137
          > which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr. Bell's
          > account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought I'd at
          > least give this a try. Any advice.
          >
          > I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over cedar 4x4
          > from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw up by 1/8
          > on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.
          >
          > As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some pics on
          > my web area.
          >
          > Robert & Amy Lundy
          > St. Peterburg, Fla.
          > rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
          > rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
          > 727-526-9329
          > 727-528-8104 FAX
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger
          > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications

          I also went with a solid mast on my Windsprint and have not found it to
          be a problem to manage. I laminated two 16' fir 2"X4"s, originally
          2"X6"s, cut down to avoid large knots. Its shape didn't come out
          exactly to plan (undersize in a few places) but after two seasons I
          haven't had any problems. It also has a curve in it which is much less
          noticable when rigged then when stowed on the trailer.
        • rlundy@atlantic.net
          Hi Michael: A few questions about your Windsprint mast: 1. Looking at the plans, it almost looks like the designed mast is 3 square with the edges rounded
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 28, 1999
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            Hi Michael:

            A few questions about your Windsprint mast:

            1. Looking at the plans, it almost looks like the designed mast is 3"
            square with the edges rounded off. Is this how yours was built? I was
            planning on a round (as round as I can get it anyway...) 3" mast using
            the bird's mouth method.

            2. Did you cut the slot at the top of the mast per the plan for the
            halyard? With the problems of the taper and bird's mouth method, I
            don't think I can plug far enoungh back to cut the slot that big. Was
            planning on using a cheek block (shaefer)at the same general location
            of the slot exit. I've owned two (22' and 27') sailboats and hate
            halyard friction.

            3. If you get a chance (no rush, I'm sure I'll be pretty slow), could
            you put the mast on a bathroom scale? I'm sure the group and other
            builders would love to have a baseline to compare a hollow stick to
            your solid fir one.

            In other news, I went to Home Depot last night looking for one of those
            outfeed rollers on a stand. Found a good folding one (I have mucho
            tool storage problems), but it was $26.00. Decided to buy one of these
            and one of the Harbor Freight roller/bracket only items and mount it to
            a board for positioning in my workmate. I'll need at least two to make
            all the long cuts. I also made up two finger boards and started
            testing out the roller/fingerboard combo. Wow, fingerboards make a
            huge difference!

            If anyone is wondering why I'm sweating these long cuts, or don't just
            use my circular saw, its because I find my cicular saw to be an object
            of dread. Without a good staight edge clamp, I make continuous
            squeals. This was one reason I bought the table saw. All this
            thinking is starting to make the project feel like "How to start a Home
            Saw Mill".... If the boards weren't so pricey, I probably wouldn't
            worry so much.

            "She who says get out of the garage and come hold the baby" thinks this
            project is just another excuse to accumulate tools. I admit it, I'm an
            absolute tool junkie. I've been trying to convince her tools are
            cheaper than another big sailboat.

            I really appreciate all your posts and responses. Can't wait to hear
            about the Oldshoe projects, as this is one of my favorite designs.

            Oh, and a tip for a good, cheap straight edge for a cicular saw: The
            Galvanized angle steel used to install garage door openers can be had
            at home depot for a pretty cheap price. It's just about the
            straightest, lightest thing I've found.

            Robert Lundy


            michael jennings <michael.jenning-@...> wrote:
            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=375
            > Robert N. Lundy wrote:
            > >
            > > Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
            > > Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was
            the
            > > sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales,
            etc a
            > > little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood
            are REAL
            > > long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the
            passenger
            > > window and the back end. Pretty funny.
            > >
            > > Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of
            plywood.
            > > Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of
            neat,
            > > you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and
            varieties
            > > of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18
            feet.
            > > So I ended up with:
            > >
            > > 1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
            > > 2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
            > > 2 16 ft clear fir 1X6
            > >
            > > Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
            > > shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really
            didn't
            > > expect to find without going to a specialty store and special
            ordering the
            > > long lenghths.
            > >
            > > If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least
            attempt
            > > to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth
            mast
            > > making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my
            portable
            > > table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and
            outfeed.
            > > For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of
            1.137
            > > which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr.
            Bell's
            > > account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought
            I'd at
            > > least give this a try. Any advice.
            > >
            > > I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over
            cedar 4x4
            > > from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw
            up by 1/8
            > > on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.
            > >
            > > As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some
            pics on
            > > my web area.
            > >
            > > Robert & Amy Lundy
            > > St. Peterburg, Fla.
            > > rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
            > > rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
            > > 727-526-9329
            > > 727-528-8104 FAX
            > >
          • Michael Jennings
            ... I figured the mast also was 3 square at the widest point based on the plans in Build the New Instant Boats . I was confused for a bit about the two
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 28, 1999
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              rlundy@... wrote:
              >
              > Hi Michael:
              >
              > A few questions about your Windsprint mast:
              >
              > 1. Looking at the plans, it almost looks like the designed mast is 3"
              > square with the edges rounded off. Is this how yours was built? I was
              > planning on a round (as round as I can get it anyway...) 3" mast using
              > the bird's mouth method.

              I figured the mast also was 3" square at the widest point based on the
              plans in "Build the New Instant Boats". I was confused for a bit about
              the two forward thwarts, where per the plans look like they leave 2"
              between them. I ended up sizing them with just over a 3" gap after I
              made the mast. I rounded off the edges of my mast with a block plane.
              If I had my router then, I probably would have done a neater job with
              it. Just the fact that it is a varnished wooden mast it looks fine. I
              don't see where a rounded mast would make any difference in performance
              and be worth the added work. I definately would not bother going for a
              hollow mast. By the time you get to making the spars, you'll find the
              hull, daggerboard and rudder have taken a lot more time than you
              anticipated and wont look forward to extra work on the mast.

              > 2. Did you cut the slot at the top of the mast per the plan for the
              > halyard? With the problems of the taper and bird's mouth method, I
              > don't think I can plug far enoungh back to cut the slot that big. Was
              > planning on using a cheek block (shaefer)at the same general location
              > of the slot exit. I've owned two (22' and 27') sailboats and hate
              > halyard friction.

              I cut the slot per the plans and used a round file to smooth it out. I
              I also drilled two holes at the top and tied a 1/8" rope across which
              works great in keeping the halyard in the slot. I haven't had any
              problems raising the sail with this arrangement. Simply pushing up the
              mast with one hand while pulling the halyard with the other works fine.
              It's very similar to rigging the lateen sail on a Sunfish. After two
              years I have noticed some fraying in the portion of the halyard that
              rests on the mast. Must be due to slight movement under tension while
              sailing. Since I have extra line for the halyard I will shift it to
              even out the wear. Also I quickly changed to good quality braided line
              for the halyard to minimize stretch but am still using cheep 3 strand
              line for the down haul.

              Finally, the boom and halyard were made from laminating two 1x pine
              boards together to easily get the 1-1/2" cross section. I did have a
              router at that time to easily round off the corners. I have had no
              problems with this softwood so far although I probably should have used
              fir for the strips that contact the mast. They are getting a little
              worn. Also I used 3" galvanized cleats for the halyard and downhaul and
              epoxied and screwed a fir block to support the mast on the thwarts
              rather than make wooden cleats.
              >
              > 3. If you get a chance (no rush, I'm sure I'll be pretty slow), could
              > you put the mast on a bathroom scale? I'm sure the group and other
              > builders would love to have a baseline to compare a hollow stick to
              > your solid fir one.

              I don't have a scale however I am able to install the mast even with the
              boat up on a trailer. I will try to borrow a scale and weigh the mast.
              >
              > In other news, I went to Home Depot last night looking for one of those
              > outfeed rollers on a stand. Found a good folding one (I have mucho
              > tool storage problems), but it was $26.00. Decided to buy one of these
              > and one of the Harbor Freight roller/bracket only items and mount it to
              > a board for positioning in my workmate. I'll need at least two to make
              > all the long cuts. I also made up two finger boards and started
              > testing out the roller/fingerboard combo. Wow, fingerboards make a
              > huge difference!
              >
              > If anyone is wondering why I'm sweating these long cuts, or don't just
              > use my circular saw, its because I find my cicular saw to be an object
              > of dread. Without a good staight edge clamp, I make continuous
              > squeals. This was one reason I bought the table saw. All this
              > thinking is starting to make the project feel like "How to start a Home
              > Saw Mill".... If the boards weren't so pricey, I probably wouldn't
              > worry so much.
              >
              > "She who says get out of the garage and come hold the baby" thinks this
              > project is just another excuse to accumulate tools. I admit it, I'm an
              > absolute tool junkie. I've been trying to convince her tools are
              > cheaper than another big sailboat.
              >
              > I really appreciate all your posts and responses. Can't wait to hear
              > about the Oldshoe projects, as this is one of my favorite designs.
              >
              > Oh, and a tip for a good, cheap straight edge for a cicular saw: The
              > Galvanized angle steel used to install garage door openers can be had
              > at home depot for a pretty cheap price. It's just about the
              > straightest, lightest thing I've found.
              >
              > Robert Lundy
              >
              > michael jennings <michael.jenning-@...> wrote:
              > original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=375
              > > Robert N. Lundy wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
              > > > Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was
              > the
              > > > sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales,
              > etc a
              > > > little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood
              > are REAL
              > > > long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the
              > passenger
              > > > window and the back end. Pretty funny.
              > > >
              > > > Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of
              > plywood.
              > > > Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of
              > neat,
              > > > you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and
              > varieties
              > > > of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18
              > feet.
              > > > So I ended up with:
              > > >
              > > > 1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
              > > > 2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
              > > > 2 16 ft clear fir 1X6
              > > >
              > > > Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
              > > > shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really
              > didn't
              > > > expect to find without going to a specialty store and special
              > ordering the
              > > > long lenghths.
              > > >
              > > > If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least
              > attempt
              > > > to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth
              > mast
              > > > making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my
              > portable
              > > > table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and
              > outfeed.
              > > > For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of
              > 1.137
              > > > which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr.
              > Bell's
              > > > account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought
              > I'd at
              > > > least give this a try. Any advice.
              > > >
              > > > I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over
              > cedar 4x4
              > > > from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw
              > up by 1/8
              > > > on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.
              > > >
              > > > As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some
              > pics on
              > > > my web area.
              > > >
              > > > Robert & Amy Lundy
              > > > St. Peterburg, Fla.
              > > > rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
              > > > rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
              > > > 727-526-9329
              > > > 727-528-8104 FAX
              > > >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger
              > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
            • Michael Jennings
              ... Sorry, PUSH UP THE BOOM WITH ONE HAND
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 28, 1999
              • 0 Attachment
                Michael Jennings wrote:
                >
                > rlundy@... wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Michael:
                > >
                > > A few questions about your Windsprint mast:
                > >
                > > 1. Looking at the plans, it almost looks like the designed mast is 3"
                > > square with the edges rounded off. Is this how yours was built? I was
                > > planning on a round (as round as I can get it anyway...) 3" mast using
                > > the bird's mouth method.
                >
                > I figured the mast also was 3" square at the widest point based on the
                > plans in "Build the New Instant Boats". I was confused for a bit about
                > the two forward thwarts, where per the plans look like they leave 2"
                > between them. I ended up sizing them with just over a 3" gap after I
                > made the mast. I rounded off the edges of my mast with a block plane.
                > If I had my router then, I probably would have done a neater job with
                > it. Just the fact that it is a varnished wooden mast it looks fine. I
                > don't see where a rounded mast would make any difference in performance
                > and be worth the added work. I definately would not bother going for a
                > hollow mast. By the time you get to making the spars, you'll find the
                > hull, daggerboard and rudder have taken a lot more time than you
                > anticipated and wont look forward to extra work on the mast.
                >
                > > 2. Did you cut the slot at the top of the mast per the plan for the
                > > halyard? With the problems of the taper and bird's mouth method, I
                > > don't think I can plug far enoungh back to cut the slot that big. Was
                > > planning on using a cheek block (shaefer)at the same general location
                > > of the slot exit. I've owned two (22' and 27') sailboats and hate
                > > halyard friction.
                >
                > I cut the slot per the plans and used a round file to smooth it out. I
                > I also drilled two holes at the top and tied a 1/8" rope across which
                > works great in keeping the halyard in the slot. I haven't had any
                > problems raising the sail with this arrangement. Simply pushing up the
                > mast with one hand while pulling the halyard with the other works fine.


                Sorry, PUSH UP THE BOOM WITH ONE HAND


                > It's very similar to rigging the lateen sail on a Sunfish. After two
                > years I have noticed some fraying in the portion of the halyard that
                > rests on the mast. Must be due to slight movement under tension while
                > sailing. Since I have extra line for the halyard I will shift it to
                > even out the wear. Also I quickly changed to good quality braided line
                > for the halyard to minimize stretch but am still using cheep 3 strand
                > line for the down haul.
                >
                > Finally, the boom and halyard were made from laminating two 1x pine
                > boards together to easily get the 1-1/2" cross section. I did have a
                > router at that time to easily round off the corners. I have had no
                > problems with this softwood so far although I probably should have used
                > fir for the strips that contact the mast. They are getting a little
                > worn. Also I used 3" galvanized cleats for the halyard and downhaul and
                > epoxied and screwed a fir block to support the mast on the thwarts
                > rather than make wooden cleats.
                > >
                > > 3. If you get a chance (no rush, I'm sure I'll be pretty slow), could
                > > you put the mast on a bathroom scale? I'm sure the group and other
                > > builders would love to have a baseline to compare a hollow stick to
                > > your solid fir one.
                >
                > I don't have a scale however I am able to install the mast even with the
                > boat up on a trailer. I will try to borrow a scale and weigh the mast.
                > >
                > > In other news, I went to Home Depot last night looking for one of those
                > > outfeed rollers on a stand. Found a good folding one (I have mucho
                > > tool storage problems), but it was $26.00. Decided to buy one of these
                > > and one of the Harbor Freight roller/bracket only items and mount it to
                > > a board for positioning in my workmate. I'll need at least two to make
                > > all the long cuts. I also made up two finger boards and started
                > > testing out the roller/fingerboard combo. Wow, fingerboards make a
                > > huge difference!
                > >
                > > If anyone is wondering why I'm sweating these long cuts, or don't just
                > > use my circular saw, its because I find my cicular saw to be an object
                > > of dread. Without a good staight edge clamp, I make continuous
                > > squeals. This was one reason I bought the table saw. All this
                > > thinking is starting to make the project feel like "How to start a Home
                > > Saw Mill".... If the boards weren't so pricey, I probably wouldn't
                > > worry so much.
                > >
                > > "She who says get out of the garage and come hold the baby" thinks this
                > > project is just another excuse to accumulate tools. I admit it, I'm an
                > > absolute tool junkie. I've been trying to convince her tools are
                > > cheaper than another big sailboat.
                > >
                > > I really appreciate all your posts and responses. Can't wait to hear
                > > about the Oldshoe projects, as this is one of my favorite designs.
                > >
                > > Oh, and a tip for a good, cheap straight edge for a cicular saw: The
                > > Galvanized angle steel used to install garage door openers can be had
                > > at home depot for a pretty cheap price. It's just about the
                > > straightest, lightest thing I've found.
                > >
                > > Robert Lundy
                > >
                > > michael jennings <michael.jenning-@...> wrote:
                > > original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=375
                > > > Robert N. Lundy wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Well, I decided to take the plunge and start buying lumber for the
                > > > > Windsprint. One of the things that attracted me to this design was
                > > the
                > > > > sweeping curves in 16 feet. Would seem to make chines, gunwales,
                > > etc a
                > > > > little easier. What I didn't realize is that these pieces of wood
                > > are REAL
                > > > > long. I have some pics of my Pathfinder with wood coming out the
                > > passenger
                > > > > window and the back end. Pretty funny.
                > > > >
                > > > > Here's the tally. Home Depot was out except as a supplier of
                > > plywood.
                > > > > Found a locally owned chain of lumber stores (Cox Lumber). Kind of
                > > neat,
                > > > > you actually go into a big "shed" full of all lengths, grades and
                > > varieties
                > > > > of lumber. The had #1 clear fir 2X and 1X lumber in stock up to 18
                > > feet.
                > > > > So I ended up with:
                > > > >
                > > > > 1 16 ft clear fir 2X4
                > > > > 2 18 ft clear fir 2x4
                > > > > 2 16 ft clear fir 1X6
                > > > >
                > > > > Total cost: a cool $159.00 (around $1.70 per foot). I was a little
                > > > > shocked, but then again, this is pretty good stuff, which I really
                > > didn't
                > > > > expect to find without going to a specialty store and special
                > > ordering the
                > > > > long lenghths.
                > > > >
                > > > > If you're wondering what the 1X6 are for, I've decided to at least
                > > attempt
                > > > > to build the mast a la WoodenBoat's recent article on bird's mouth
                > > mast
                > > > > making. Its' going to mean a number of really long cuts in my
                > > portable
                > > > > table saw and I'll have to jury rig some supports for infeed and
                > > outfeed.
                > > > > For the Windsprint's 3" mast Gregg's program gives a stave width of
                > > 1.137
                > > > > which comes out as 1 9/64ths (9/64 is .140). After reading Mr.
                > > Bell's
                > > > > account of a heavier than desired mast in his windsprint, I thought
                > > I'd at
                > > > > least give this a try. Any advice.
                > > > >
                > > > > I got the sternpost and and stem out tonight. Used a left over
                > > cedar 4x4
                > > > > from another project (is cedar dust dangerous?). Managed to screw
                > > up by 1/8
                > > > > on the depth of the parts, but it doesn'seem terminal.
                > > > >
                > > > > As soon as there's anything to see, I'll try to start posting some
                > > pics on
                > > > > my web area.
                > > > >
                > > > > Robert & Amy Lundy
                > > > > St. Peterburg, Fla.
                > > > > rnlundy@... <mailto:rnlundy@...>
                > > > > rlundy@... <mailto:rlundy@...>
                > > > > 727-526-9329
                > > > > 727-528-8104 FAX
                > > > >
                > >
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                > >
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