Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: micro sheer clamp......how?

Expand Messages
  • Peter Lenihan
    ... No ... Jason, Dry fit the shear clamps,and simply have a tight butt joint where they change their sweep. For the rub rails;I hope that you traced out its
    Message 1 of 9 , May 1 2:01 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jason Stancil" <jasonstancil@h...>
      wrote:
      > I went to try and dry fit the rub rails and sheer clamps tonite.
      No
      > way that sheer clamp is making that bend by the cockpit/cabin
      > interface. Further more bolger navigator conversion drawing has a
      > sharp cut......bruce's navigator looks like that.....yet oink
      > does'nt. Feedback would be appreciated before i take the jigsaw to
      > the hull.
      > Thanks,
      > Jason

      Jason,
      Dry fit the shear clamps,and simply have a tight butt joint
      where they change their sweep.
      For the rub rails;I hope that you traced out its' sweep on the
      side panels,while it was laying flat on the floor, and that it was
      done "perfectly" sweet and fair. Use that line to guide your install
      of the rub rail.Beginning at the bow and with a helper holding up
      the aft end of the rubrail start by screwing the rubrail down from
      the inside out.Get a screw in say every foot or so and be most
      particular about following the traced line.A less then perfectly
      fair curve in your rubrail will stick out like a sore
      thumb,especially on a slab sided hull.As you slowly work your aft
      make sure your helper understands this as they apply a nice steady
      pressure to the rubrail.Once she is all installed,take the time to
      look her over a few times from many angles to ensure she is in fact
      perfectly fair.
      Now,working backwards,back out the screws only enough to
      release the rubrail while your helper holds the now straightening
      out end and keeps it from twisting and breaking. If you want to be
      fussy,you may wish to put a hollow on the back face of the rub rail
      before offering her up for the permanent install.Into this
      hollow,lay in your favorite poison(epoxy or 3m5200) and then proceed
      to re-install the rubrail using a few proud screws to align the rail
      perfectly back into the correct postition.
      Are you going with a one piece rubrail or two piece as on the
      plans(I think!)?

      Hope this helps.

      Peter Lenihan
    • Jason Stancil
      Dry fit the shear clamps,and simply have a tight butt joint ... Thats what i figured would have to do ... Yeah that will be a challange. The port side has
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1 7:17 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Dry fit the shear clamps,and simply have a tight butt joint
        > where they change their sweep.

        Thats what i figured would have to do

        > For the rub rails;I hope that you traced out its' sweep on the
        > side panels,while it was laying flat on the floor, and that it was
        > done "perfectly" sweet and fair.

        Yeah that will be a challange. The port side has lines on inside so
        i'll have to make a little jig to scribe it to the ouside.....since
        i did a two for one cut i've got no lines on the starboard side. I
        was thinking of marking the points on the side from the the
        assembled expansion on the plans and hoping the the rub rail itself
        would form a fair curve......if it's not quite right i do both sides
        this way so they are symetrically goofy.......so much for saving
        time doing the two for one cut.

        > Now,working backwards,back out the screws only enough to
        > release the rubrail while your helper holds the now straightening
        > out end and keeps it from twisting and breaking.

        Huh? what does that mean?

        Are you going with a one piece rubrail or two piece as on the
        > plans(I think!)?

        Two pieces on the plans.....but being incapable of doing as i'm told
        (unless it involves putting big ass holes in my transoms) I'm
        thinking of doing mine like bruce hallman's navigator. Because, i'm
        manhandling it solo and i figure i can put the thin pieces in easier
        than that one big inner rail. Also i hate scarfing and the multiple
        pieces will self scarf due to it neiboring strip. I'll see how it
        goes.

        > Hope this helps.

        yep thanks

        Jason
      • bruce@hallman.org
        ... [Could you, or someone, please post the URL link to your Micro photo album?] Two pieces of 3/4 square wood will bend tighter curves than one piece 3/4 x
        Message 3 of 9 , May 1 9:47 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          --- "Jason Stancil" wrote:
          > No way that sheer clamp
          > is making that bend

          [Could you, or someone,
          please post the URL link to
          your Micro photo album?]

          Two pieces of 3/4" square
          wood will bend tighter
          curves than one piece
          3/4" x 1 1/2". Especially
          if the curves are in three
          dimensions.

          Also, I made many of the
          tight bends by not bending
          but simply cutting a curved
          piece of wood to fit the curve.

          One unanticipated curve issue
          that I am just encountering
          is that the camber of the
          roof of my boat has eased by
          two inches in the heat of
          California Spring, versus
          the cool of last winter.

          This has implications to the
          fit of the sliding roof hatch
          which I am presently dealing!
        • Peter Lenihan
          ... Jason, It means that this is what is going to be happening as you remove the rubrail from its dry fit stage,prior to hollowing and gluing.You want to
          Message 4 of 9 , May 3 9:46 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Jason Stancil" <jasonstancil@h...>
            wrote:
            > > Now,working backwards,back out the screws only enough to
            > > release the rubrail while your helper holds the now straightening
            > > out end and keeps it from twisting and breaking.
            >
            > Huh? what does that mean?

            Jason,
            It "means" that this is what is going to be happening as you
            remove the rubrail from its "dry fit" stage,prior to hollowing and
            gluing.You want to make sure the end being freed from the crews does
            not fall off and crack uncerimoniously.Also,do not back out the
            screws too far since you want to keep just a little point sticking
            out proud to serve as guide points for perfect re-attachment.This is
            most helpful since a rub rail loaded with glue is going to be one
            slippy snake and with it smearing all over the place :-), you'll be
            hard pressed to find your pencil line again underneath the glue.......

            Hope this makes better sense and that it is not too late to be
            helpful!

            Sincerely,

            Peter Lenihan,ex owner/builder of Lestat.........
          • Bruce Hallman
            ... Worth mentioning, [if you have not already noticed.] The rubrail bends in two directions. I don t have my plans handy, but I recall the Micro rubrail is
            Message 5 of 9 , May 3 10:11 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              > the micro rubrail

              Worth mentioning, [if you have not
              already noticed.] The rubrail bends
              in two directions. I don't have
              my plans handy, but I recall the
              Micro rubrail is about 3/4" by 2"?

              The 3/4" direction bends easily with
              the width of the boat, but the 2"
              direction is a much tougher bend
              following the shear line. Avoid
              the temptation to increase the
              2" dimension because you will not
              be able to follow the shear line
              bend.

              If you want a wider rubrail, [like
              I did], you need to make it up from
              multiple pieces. I chose to use three
              3/4" x 1 1/2" strips plus an overlay
              of two 3/4" x 1 1/2" strips ripped from
              nice D.Fir 2x6's.

              Worth a debate, the sail plan drawing
              of the Micro Navigator seems to show
              a wider rubrail than the rubrail
              shown on the standard Micro. [To my
              eye at least!] Also the stern transom
              of the Navigator shows a very wide rubrail
              [not shown on the standard Micro transom].
              I interpreted this to mean the Navigator
              has a wider rubrail all around, including
              a rubrail across the bow transom.

              Also, I am fond of my extra deep rubrail
              on one side which gives me a toe-hold to shimmy
              around the Navigator Cabin, [PCB approved.]
            • Paul Lefebvre
              I just mounted my rubrails on Saturday so it s fresh in my mind that the standard plans call for 2: 1/2 thick layers, the inner one is supposed to be 2 1/2
              Message 6 of 9 , May 3 10:59 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                I just mounted my rubrails on Saturday so it's fresh in my mind that the
                standard plans call for 2: 1/2" thick layers, the inner one is supposed to
                be 2 1/2" by 1/2", outer is something like 1 1/4" x 1/2". I'd decided to go
                with a single piece of 3/4" x 2 1/2" but it just wouldn't make the bend; I
                ripped 1/2" off and the 3/4" x 2" rails went on, but still required a fair
                bit of force.

                I'd pre-bent my rails by suspending them between a bench and a stool and
                leaving a 40lb weight on the middle for about 2 weeks; this made them sag to
                almost follow the boat's hull shape by themselves in the horizontal; but the
                bend in the vertical dimension was tough! They are now temporarily screwed
                on, before sticking them on chemically I will pull the boat out of the shed
                and have a look from different angles/distances to be sure I'm happy, for as
                Peter mentioned, this line is very important in the overall appearance of
                the boat. I plan to leave them screwed on for a couple weeks and work on
                other stuff, let 'em get used to their new shape a bit before I go back and
                wrestle with them again to get the epoxy in between them and the hull; might
                make it go a bit easier.

                By the way Peter, thanks for the tip on the Sikkens Cetol. Great stuff;
                really rich color and very easy to work with! Makes my bargain
                pseudo-mahogany look like expensive teak!

                Paul Lefebvre

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Bruce Hallman [mailto:bruce@...]

                > the micro rubrail

                Worth mentioning, [if you have not
                already noticed.] The rubrail bends
                in two directions. I don't have
                my plans handy, but I recall the
                Micro rubrail is about 3/4" by 2"?

                The 3/4" direction bends easily with
                the width of the boat, but the 2"
                direction is a much tougher bend
                following the shear line.
              • Jason Stancil
                Peter- thanks for the explaination on both the keel and the rub rails. I did nt realize you used a different keel assembly than the plans, thanks though. I
                Message 7 of 9 , May 3 11:24 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Peter- thanks for the explaination on both the keel and the rub
                  rails.
                  I did'nt realize you used a different keel assembly than the plans,
                  thanks though. I think the keel assembly want be too tough. I'm
                  going to build it up after i glass the hull and get the batten on,
                  then i'm just going to set it aside till i drag her out for the
                  finishing and mount it then. The flipping was brutal the first time.
                  I've since added the two navigator frames and pulled thge temps and
                  i've started the seat and air box framing so it should be a good 50 -
                  75 lbs. heavier the 2nd time around. Then once i get the glass and
                  wpoxy on another 15.......i better start being nice to the neibor
                  kids......the pissed me off saying it was goofy looking :)

                  Bruce thanks for the rub rail info.

                  I got my sheer claps on both inner and outer on one side i'll do the
                  other some time this week. My problem was i was trying to use 1.5
                  x .75 to beef it up........tisk, tisk. Not what bolger specified. I
                  went with the .75(+)x.75(+) and it flopped right in place.....only a
                  few curses to persuade it. I used oak for the rails and everone here
                  says "oak don't glue and rots easy" so I clamped both sides in place
                  and just drove some 2" stainless screws right through the outside
                  rail through the hull and only in one or to places did the tips poke
                  through the inner rail......all of those places out of sight in the
                  flooding wells....i'll grind them later. I measured the screws and
                  spaced them evenly the SS heads seated nice and look good. I'll coat
                  it all with epoxy so the water stays out.

                  As for the rub rail, i've got to make a little scribe/transfer jig
                  as my marks are on the inside of the hull (dumb!). Like you said
                  bruce tough to bend the 2 inches up to follow the sheer so i'm
                  laminating several pieces together like you did. I noticed that the
                  navigator sheet shows bigger rails and i figured if they were 1.5
                  inches thick i could scoot around the cabin using those and the hand
                  rails i'm going to put on the cabin top......there i go again
                  deviating from the plans. It's your fault bruce i thought yours
                  looked good. If it was'nt for your pictures and oink online i'd be
                  lost.

                  Thanks for everyones help

                  Launch by 2027 or bust!
                  Jason
                • Nels
                  ... I would like add that this is also handy even when the boat is on a trailer... Nels
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 3 11:51 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@h...> wrote:
                    > > the micro rubrail
                    >> Also, I am fond of my extra deep rubrail
                    > on one side which gives me a toe-hold to shimmy
                    > around the Navigator Cabin, [PCB approved.]

                    I would like add that this is also handy even when the boat is on a
                    trailer... Nels
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.