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yogurt cups

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  • Frank San Miguel
    I have a whole stack of yogert cups I ve been saving to help me do small batches of epoxy. You know, you forgot to fill that one area, or glue that one little
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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      I have a whole stack of yogert cups I've been saving to help me do
      small batches of epoxy. You know, you forgot to fill that one area,
      or glue that one little cleat.

      Only problem is I can't figure out how to mix epoxy in them. Anyone
      have a good strategy for accurate mixing small batches (less than 2
      oz) in yogurt cups?

      Thanks,

      Frank San Miguel
      Landenber, PA
    • Tim Rohrer
      I have been using them and pre-marked the outside with a permanent marker so I can pour in the liquid to that portion. Only thing I have found is that epoxy
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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        I have been using them and pre-marked the outside with
        a permanent marker so I can pour in the liquid to that
        portion. Only thing I have found is that epoxy seems
        to eat through the permanent ink : )

        Tim
        tgrohrer(at)yahoo.com

        --- Frank San Miguel <sanmi@...> wrote:
        > I have a whole stack of yogert cups I've been saving
        > to help me do
        > small batches of epoxy. You know, you forgot to
        > fill that one area,
        > or glue that one little cleat.
        >
        > Only problem is I can't figure out how to mix epoxy
        > in them. Anyone
        > have a good strategy for accurate mixing small
        > batches (less than 2
        > oz) in yogurt cups?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Frank San Miguel
        > Landenber, PA
        >
        >

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      • Bruce Hector
        I routinely use paper coffee cups for small batches using the West mini pumps, no problem, With manufactureres that don t offer pumps, just buy two identical
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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          I routinely use paper coffee cups for small batches using the West
          mini pumps, no problem,

          With manufactureres that don't offer pumps, just buy two identical
          liquid soap dispensers from your local dollar store, keep one for
          resin and the other for hardener et voila, field expedient epoxy
          pump system. Easy for 2:1, 1:1, even 3:1. Count the pumps out loud
          to avoid improper mixing.

          Great for those small batches.

          Bruce Hector
          Sipping a fine "Harper Valley IPA" from the Fredericksburg Micro
          Brewery with Chuck the Duck in Harper, Texas, trying to get up the
          anbition to head for the galley and start the chicken oreganati for
          tonights dinner as the sun sets in the deep, warm, hill country of
          Texas.
        • Chuck Leinweber
          Pumps ...... Anyone have a good strategy for accurate mixing small batches (less than 2 oz) in yogurt cups? Thanks, Frank San Miguel Landenber, PA [Non-text
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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            Pumps

            ...... Anyone have a good strategy for accurate mixing small batches (less than 2 oz) in yogurt cups?

            Thanks,

            Frank San Miguel
            Landenber, PA





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • mat_man22
            Hi Frank The price of digital scales has come alot in the past few years. They will let you zero out the cup weight (tar). Best of luck Mat
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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              Hi Frank

              The price of digital scales has come alot in the past few years.
              They will let you zero out the cup weight (tar).

              Best of luck

              Mat
            • Roger Derby
              Careful there. For System Three anyway, the volume ratio is 2:1, but the weight ratio is 100:44. Roger derbyrm@starband.net http://derbyrm.mystarband.net ...
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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                Careful there. For System Three anyway, the volume ratio is 2:1, but the
                weight ratio is 100:44.

                Roger
                derbyrm@...
                http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "mat_man22" <mat_man@...>


                > Hi Frank
                >
                > The price of digital scales has come alot in the past few years.
                > They will let you zero out the cup weight (tare).
              • John ONeill
                Try using a balance beam calabrated for weight. Anything will do. I use an 18 piece of wood with two nails drivin partway into the sides at the middle as the
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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                  Try using a balance beam calabrated for weight. Anything will do. I
                  use an 18" piece of wood with two nails drivin partway into the sides
                  at the middle as the 'axle.' Place a stop at one far end against
                  which to place your cup for the epoxy mix. Now to make
                  yourcalibration marks:

                  For System 3 the ratio is 1:4.3 by weight.

                  From the 'axle' I measured out 12.59 cm (or close) and placed
                  a 'resin' mark. The 'resin and hardener' mark is 18cm from the 'axle.'

                  The procedure is to place your cup against the stop, then balance the
                  beam using a weight so that the cup end just drops.

                  Next, place another weight equal to the amount of resin you think
                  you'll be needing centerline on the 'resin' mark. Nuts work real well
                  for this because you can use their stop sign shape to line them up
                  easily right on centerline.

                  Fill the cup with resin until it just drops.

                  move the resin weight to the 'resin hardener' mark, again, on
                  centerline.

                  Fill the cup with hardener until it just drops.

                  You're done.

                  It works great. No more calibrating cups. No more hoping the
                  calibrated cups you bought at a premium are indeed calibrated
                  correctly. The only drawback is that you have to pour sloowwwww. But
                  for small amounts . . .

                  For other systems you're on your own for figuring the calibration
                  marks! (I got my numbers from a little article in a Traditional Small
                  Boat Association newsletter some years back)

                  John O'Neill

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Frank San Miguel" <sanmi@y...> wrote:
                  > I have a whole stack of yogert cups I've been saving to help me do
                  > small batches of epoxy. You know, you forgot to fill that one area,
                  > or glue that one little cleat.
                  >
                  > Only problem is I can't figure out how to mix epoxy in them. Anyone
                  > have a good strategy for accurate mixing small batches (less than 2
                  > oz) in yogurt cups?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  > Frank San Miguel
                  > Landenber, PA
                • Lincoln Ross
                  You can get graduated one oz. cups from hobby stores and from people who work in hospitals. And I bet you can find a low cost mail order source. I seem to
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 1, 2004
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                    You can get graduated one oz. cups from hobby stores and from people who
                    work in hospitals. And I bet you can find a low cost mail order source.
                    I seem to recall seeing stuff like this at sciplus.com I think the
                    larger graduated cups from Glen-L will do as little as 2 oz., but it's
                    been awhile so I can't guarantee that.

                    If the containers are all the same, I've heard of the following trick:
                    put two cups together. Put in desired amount of one part (whichever part
                    is less). Place on level surface and mark fluid level on side of outer
                    cup. Now put in desired amount of other part and mark total level. Then
                    you can save the outer cup and put another cup in it to replicate. You
                    can do it the first time with something convenient like water.

                    Then there's always the sensitive electronic scale, possibly covered
                    with saran wrap (but be sure there is no tension in the wrap), and
                    hopefully with a tare button. Keep in mind that the weight ratio will be
                    a little different than the volume ratio. This is how I've seen it done
                    professionally. But the scales do get messy.

                    >Frank San Miguel wrote:
                    >I have a whole stack of yogert cups I've been saving to help me do
                    >small batches of epoxy. You know, you forgot to fill that one area,
                    >or glue that one little cleat.
                    >
                    >Only problem is I can't figure out how to mix epoxy in them. Anyone
                    >have a good strategy for accurate mixing small batches (less than 2
                    >oz) in yogurt cups?
                    >
                    >Thanks,
                    >
                    >Frank San Miguel
                    >Landenber, PA
                    >
                  • Frank San Miguel
                    Thanks for all of the great ideas. I think I ll try them all!
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
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                      Thanks for all of the great ideas. I think I'll try them all!
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