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Re: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.

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  • Justin Meddock
    In Buehler s Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a water based lagging
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
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      In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
      to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
      water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
      I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
      but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
      Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...

      Justin



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Nels" <arvent@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 12:47 AM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.


      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, TOMCBRADY@C... wrote:
      > > Hello John and Bob,
      > > I will look on WoodenBoat that suggestion makes a lot of
      > sense.
      > > The reason I was wondering about a painted canvas deck was
      > as an
      > > alternate, less toxic, less expensive but acceptable substitute for
      > epoxy and
      > > fiberglass.
      >
      > Hi Tom,
      >
      > I have a wood and canvas canoe and one of the reasons that canvas
      > worked was that lead fillers and paint where the traditional
      > preservativies for the cotton fabric. Regular paints won't work as
      > well. However a canoe is also not exposed to the sun as much as a
      > boat deck.
      >
      > Not sure how long a canvas deck would last in the Florida sun and
      > climate. Then it takes special skills to install, much more than
      > glass cloth, and it is likely more expensive.
      >
      > I would think painted MDO on the decks should work. How long do the
      > highway signs last in Florida?
      >
      > Cheers, Nels
      >
      >
      >
      > Bolger rules!!!
      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
      > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
      > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
      > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
      (978) 282-1349
      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • grant corson
      What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch or irratation, bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas. Grant
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
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        What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch or irratation,
        bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas.
        Grant
        on 4/1/04 6:30 AM, Justin Meddock at jmeddock@... wrote:

        > In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
        > to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
        > water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
        > I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
        > but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
        > Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...
        >
        > Justin
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Nels" <arvent@...>
        > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 12:47 AM
        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.
        >
        >
        >> --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, TOMCBRADY@C... wrote:
        >>> Hello John and Bob,
        >>> I will look on WoodenBoat that suggestion makes a lot of
        >> sense.
        >>> The reason I was wondering about a painted canvas deck was
        >> as an
        >>> alternate, less toxic, less expensive but acceptable substitute for
        >> epoxy and
        >>> fiberglass.
        >>
        >> Hi Tom,
        >>
        >> I have a wood and canvas canoe and one of the reasons that canvas
        >> worked was that lead fillers and paint where the traditional
        >> preservativies for the cotton fabric. Regular paints won't work as
        >> well. However a canoe is also not exposed to the sun as much as a
        >> boat deck.
        >>
        >> Not sure how long a canvas deck would last in the Florida sun and
        >> climate. Then it takes special skills to install, much more than
        >> glass cloth, and it is likely more expensive.
        >>
        >> I would think painted MDO on the decks should work. How long do the
        >> highway signs last in Florida?
        >>
        >> Cheers, Nels
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Bolger rules!!!
        >> - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        >> - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        >> - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        >> - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
        > (978) 282-1349
        >> - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >> - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
        > (978) 282-1349
        > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... I used a ripped up cotton dress shirt and left over latex paint to fasten in some foam blocks encased in luaun plywood bulkheads. [flotation for my Roar]
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
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          --- TOMCBRADY@... wrote:
          > The reason I was wondering
          > about a painted
          > canvas deck was as an
          > alternate, less toxic, less
          > expensive but acceptable
          > substitute for epoxy and
          > fiberglass.

          I used a ripped up cotton
          dress shirt and left over
          latex paint to fasten in
          some foam blocks encased
          in luaun plywood bulkheads.
          [flotation for my Roar]

          This was three years ago and
          it is still holding together.
        • Roger Derby
          Buehler s main thesis is that there is no money tree in his backyard. He says he tried bedding canvas in epoxy once and would never do it again. I enjoyed his
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
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            Buehler's main thesis is that there is no money tree in his backyard.

            He says he tried bedding canvas in epoxy once and would never do it again.

            I enjoyed his reference to "Miami Teak" which is supposedly used for boat
            decks in the low rent districts of South Florida -- three or four layers of
            tarpaper smeared with asphalt based roofing tar and covered with aluminum or
            white "Cool-Dry" trailer roof paint.

            He does like Arabol, as mentioned.

            Roger
            derbyrm@...
            http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "grant corson" <corson@...>


            > What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch
            > or irritation, bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas.
            > Grant
            > on 4/1/04 6:30 AM, Justin Meddock at jmeddock@... wrote:
            >
            > > In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
            > > to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
            > > water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
            > > I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
            > > but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
            > > Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...
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