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Re: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.

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  • Justin Meddock
    In Buehler s Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a water based lagging
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
      In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
      to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
      water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
      I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
      but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
      Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...

      Justin



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Nels" <arvent@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 12:47 AM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.


      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, TOMCBRADY@C... wrote:
      > > Hello John and Bob,
      > > I will look on WoodenBoat that suggestion makes a lot of
      > sense.
      > > The reason I was wondering about a painted canvas deck was
      > as an
      > > alternate, less toxic, less expensive but acceptable substitute for
      > epoxy and
      > > fiberglass.
      >
      > Hi Tom,
      >
      > I have a wood and canvas canoe and one of the reasons that canvas
      > worked was that lead fillers and paint where the traditional
      > preservativies for the cotton fabric. Regular paints won't work as
      > well. However a canoe is also not exposed to the sun as much as a
      > boat deck.
      >
      > Not sure how long a canvas deck would last in the Florida sun and
      > climate. Then it takes special skills to install, much more than
      > glass cloth, and it is likely more expensive.
      >
      > I would think painted MDO on the decks should work. How long do the
      > highway signs last in Florida?
      >
      > Cheers, Nels
      >
      >
      >
      > Bolger rules!!!
      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
      > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
      > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
      > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
      (978) 282-1349
      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • grant corson
      What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch or irratation, bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas. Grant
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
        What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch or irratation,
        bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas.
        Grant
        on 4/1/04 6:30 AM, Justin Meddock at jmeddock@... wrote:

        > In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
        > to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
        > water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
        > I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
        > but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
        > Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...
        >
        > Justin
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Nels" <arvent@...>
        > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 12:47 AM
        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Canvas deck.
        >
        >
        >> --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, TOMCBRADY@C... wrote:
        >>> Hello John and Bob,
        >>> I will look on WoodenBoat that suggestion makes a lot of
        >> sense.
        >>> The reason I was wondering about a painted canvas deck was
        >> as an
        >>> alternate, less toxic, less expensive but acceptable substitute for
        >> epoxy and
        >>> fiberglass.
        >>
        >> Hi Tom,
        >>
        >> I have a wood and canvas canoe and one of the reasons that canvas
        >> worked was that lead fillers and paint where the traditional
        >> preservativies for the cotton fabric. Regular paints won't work as
        >> well. However a canoe is also not exposed to the sun as much as a
        >> boat deck.
        >>
        >> Not sure how long a canvas deck would last in the Florida sun and
        >> climate. Then it takes special skills to install, much more than
        >> glass cloth, and it is likely more expensive.
        >>
        >> I would think painted MDO on the decks should work. How long do the
        >> highway signs last in Florida?
        >>
        >> Cheers, Nels
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Bolger rules!!!
        >> - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        >> - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        >> - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        >> - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
        > (978) 282-1349
        >> - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >> - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax:
        > (978) 282-1349
        > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... I used a ripped up cotton dress shirt and left over latex paint to fasten in some foam blocks encased in luaun plywood bulkheads. [flotation for my Roar]
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
          --- TOMCBRADY@... wrote:
          > The reason I was wondering
          > about a painted
          > canvas deck was as an
          > alternate, less toxic, less
          > expensive but acceptable
          > substitute for epoxy and
          > fiberglass.

          I used a ripped up cotton
          dress shirt and left over
          latex paint to fasten in
          some foam blocks encased
          in luaun plywood bulkheads.
          [flotation for my Roar]

          This was three years ago and
          it is still holding together.
        • Roger Derby
          Buehler s main thesis is that there is no money tree in his backyard. He says he tried bedding canvas in epoxy once and would never do it again. I enjoyed his
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 1, 2004
            Buehler's main thesis is that there is no money tree in his backyard.

            He says he tried bedding canvas in epoxy once and would never do it again.

            I enjoyed his reference to "Miami Teak" which is supposedly used for boat
            decks in the low rent districts of South Florida -- three or four layers of
            tarpaper smeared with asphalt based roofing tar and covered with aluminum or
            white "Cool-Dry" trailer roof paint.

            He does like Arabol, as mentioned.

            Roger
            derbyrm@...
            http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "grant corson" <corson@...>


            > What about using Dynel? A woven fabric, not glass, no itch
            > or irritation, bed in epoxy and has the look of canvas.
            > Grant
            > on 4/1/04 6:30 AM, Justin Meddock at jmeddock@... wrote:
            >
            > > In Buehler's Backyard Boatbuilding, he suggests as an alternative
            > > to canvas covered or epoxy/glass decks using glass cloth set in a
            > > water based lagging compound for steam pipes called Arabol.
            > > I have no idea what the finished product looks like,
            > > but I assume you get a canvas-like look and texture.
            > > Anyway, worth a look, and BBB is worth reading too...
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