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Re: [bolger] The need for speed...

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  • John Bell
    As long as you ve got at least one crew, Bolger s Light Schooner ought to meet your need for speed. It meets most of your requirements except that it s 23
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 11 7:05 AM
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      As long as you've got at least one crew, Bolger's Light Schooner ought to
      meet your need for speed. It meets most of your requirements except that
      it's 23' long. As for getting upwind, well, none of these light boats are
      going to be great pointers with their low tech rigs and crude foils. But you
      can certainly get a thrill on a reach!

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Stephan Hunter Henshall" <steve_henshall@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2004 9:54 AM
      Subject: [bolger] The need for speed...


      > Still having a good time with my Featherwind and at the moment
      > adding flotation and building a new stronger weighted leeboard.
      >
      > I's time to consider boat number two. We all do this don't we???
      > I'm looking for suggestions with, loosly, the following criteria.
      >
      > Fast. 12 to 20 feet in length that is beachable, shoal draft, Can
      > be built using ply, copper nails, and glue. Monohul is preffered
      > but I'd consider a catamaran if need be. Speed is definetly my main
      > consideration at this time. I would like to build from hardware
      > store parts and for the sailing to be simple and uncomplicated not
      > requireing a second person on board but I don't mind hiking out a
      > bit for balance. Any sail rig is OK but I prefer lower sails such
      > as sprit or lug. Ketch with a jib would be OK or even lateen or
      > gaff rigged. Leeboard, centerboard or swing keel is OK.
      >
      > I know all of you have your own requirements when you sail, and
      > Featherwind is pretty fast but what are the real speedsters of the
      > Bolger line? I'd even consider a schooner if she pointed reasonably
      > well.
    • k_s_oneill
      ... reasonably ... Bolger designed two proas, both of which would be quite fast. Given your expressed preferences, I would suggest the smaller of the two, the
      Message 2 of 23 , Feb 11 11:45 AM
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        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stephan Hunter Henshall"
        <steve_henshall@y...> wrote:
        > Still having a good time with my Featherwind and at the moment
        > adding flotation and building a new stronger weighted leeboard.
        >
        > I's time to consider boat number two. We all do this don't we???
        > I'm looking for suggestions with, loosly, the following criteria.
        >
        > Fast. 12 to 20 feet in length that is beachable, shoal draft, Can
        > be built using ply, copper nails, and glue. Monohul is preffered
        > but I'd consider a catamaran if need be. Speed is definetly my main
        > consideration at this time. I would like to build from hardware
        > store parts and for the sailing to be simple and uncomplicated not
        > requireing a second person on board but I don't mind hiking out a
        > bit for balance. Any sail rig is OK but I prefer lower sails such
        > as sprit or lug. Ketch with a jib would be OK or even lateen or
        > gaff rigged. Leeboard, centerboard or swing keel is OK.
        >
        > I know all of you have your own requirements when you sail, and
        > Featherwind is pretty fast but what are the real speedsters of the
        > Bolger line? I'd even consider a schooner if she pointed
        reasonably
        > well.
        >
        > Any ideas of suggestions?
        > Smooth sailing to all and for those of you a bit farther north than
        > me I hope your weather is good.

        Bolger designed two proas, both of which would be quite fast. Given
        your expressed preferences, I would suggest the smaller of the two,
        the 20'er in "Boats with an Open Mind." Easy to build, square
        bottom, long skinny Bolger box, pretty good looking rudder setup,
        rocketship fast. I would **NOT** suggest using the sail shown. It's
        been tried by several sailors in various places and found to be hard
        to control when coming about at even moderate wind strengths; for
        more on this search the proa_file group for the keywords "Bolger rig"
        and "AYRS rig;" John Dalziel has written up his experiences at some
        length. Your two best rig choices would be a crab claw or a
        Gibbons/Dierking rig. Both are low ce, simple, can be built of low
        tech materials, can be cut flat and still perform well. There's a
        current discussion on the proa list about various ways to speed up
        the handling of the crab claw when coming about; the Gibbons is quite
        fast to shunt, though it can be a handful to try it in lots of wind.
        Both benefit a lot from Gary Dierking's very clever uses of bungee to
        keep the mast under control, which quite transform the boat.

        Both would give very good performance up to a close reach, and would
        get you to windward ok, though would likely not keep up with a good
        two person jib/main planing dinghy with good foils dead to weather.
        Overall the boat would perform about like a Hobie 14, perhaps on a
        reach more up in the class of a 16. And you know, that's fast.

        And it's a monohull! All traditional proas are monohulls, they just
        have the ballast in the right place <G>.

        best

        Kevin
      • Hugo Tyson
        What do you mean mini Sandbagger? Are you referring to Bolger s 15 x 7 1 Harbinger catboat design(Folding Schooner Book) which is based more on the New
        Message 3 of 23 , Feb 11 3:25 PM
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          What do you mean mini Sandbagger? Are you referring to Bolger's 15' x 7'1" "Harbinger" catboat design(Folding Schooner Book) which is based more on the New York style of Catboat that developed into the "Sandbaggers". My father has nearly finished his "Harbinger" catboat and she should be on the water within the next couple of weeks.She's a combination of traditional and modern construction. She looks absolutley authentic as a traditional boat but is built strip-planked, epoxy saturated and externally sheathed with Dynel for improved durability, strength and water tightness.Not that its absolutely necessary with a strip-planked boat, she has bent frames as if she was a carvel built boat!(Mainly for keeping her looks traditional as well as extra strength). I'll post some photos in the files section when she's launched.


          Hugo Tyson, Tasmania, Australia.

          pvanderwaart <pvanderw@...> wrote:
          > Fast.

          Although the word 'fast' is not a comparative, the context poses the
          question, "fast as compared to what?" All boats are fast compared to
          glaciers and slow compared to jets. More reasonably, a boat that is
          the fastest of the 12-20 foot, centerboard/daggerboard, low aspect
          rig sailboats is going to be slow compared to some deep keeled,
          moveable ballast boats, and to some catamarans, either of which will
          have a high aspect ratio rig.

          There is also the question of whether your greed for speed requires
          upwind speed, or if you can be satisfied by thrilling reaches. The
          former is much more difficult.

          That said, my first thought is a catamaran, say a Woods Pixie or
          similar. Given your desire for an unusual rig, you might look at Jeff
          Gilbert's Hot Chili.
          http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/r/designs/gilbert/hotchili/hc.htm

          As for monohulls, your spec leaves out the most obvious Bolger
          contender, the Light Schooner. Bolger claimed that the Singlehanded
          Schooner could be competitive with the L-16, which would make
          it "fast" but the keel puts in out of the "readily beachable"
          category. I once read a fairly convincing analysis of Uffa Fox's
          attempts to sail very fast in sailing canoes. It suggested that light
          weight was the key, and that the extra weight of a second crew member
          did not pay off. Fox's one-man boats were always faster than his 2-
          man boats.

          PCB did design a mini-sandbagger. I don't remember the construction,
          either stip or cold-molded I would guess. Chebacco owners have
          reported very good performance off the wind. Surf is a very high
          performance boat.

          Clark Mills' Windmill and the Schock Pt. Jude are quite high
          performance v-bottom sloops.

          Peter





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        • Susan Davis
          ... So build the daggerboard without the lead -- she ll still be a very nice daysailer, she just won t come back up from a knockdown without being righted
          Message 4 of 23 , Feb 11 3:32 PM
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            > Bolger claimed that the Singlehanded
            > Schooner could be competitive with the L-16, which would make
            > it "fast" but the keel puts in out of the "readily beachable"
            > category.

            So build the daggerboard without the lead -- she'll still be a very nice
            daysailer, she just won't come back up from a knockdown without being
            righted Laser-style. And you could build a second one with the lead for
            cruising, and make them interchangeable.

            -- Sue --
            (waiting for the weather to warm up so I can finish mine)

            --
            Susan Davis <futabachan@...>
          • pvanderwaart
            ... No. It was designed years after Harbinger and appeared as a cartoon in Small Boat Journal. It s possible that it never progressed past the cartoon stage.
            Message 5 of 23 , Feb 11 4:14 PM
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              > What do you mean mini Sandbagger?
              > Are you referring to Bolger's 15' x 7'1" "Harbinger" catboat...

              No. It was designed years after Harbinger and appeared as a cartoon
              in Small Boat Journal. It's possible that it never progressed past
              the cartoon stage.

              Harbinger was not designed to be fast, but I bet she's especially
              good in light air. And, of course, very beautiful. The racing catboat
              classes all trended toward hard-bilged shapes that were faster but
              crankier.

              Peter
            • Hugo Tyson
              Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ Sandbagger design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos section of this group? ... No. It was
              Message 6 of 23 , Feb 11 7:34 PM
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                Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ "Sandbagger" design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos section of this group?


                pvanderwaart <pvanderw@...> wrote:
                > What do you mean mini Sandbagger?
                > Are you referring to Bolger's 15' x 7'1" "Harbinger" catboat...

                No. It was designed years after Harbinger and appeared as a cartoon
                in Small Boat Journal. It's possible that it never progressed past
                the cartoon stage.

                Harbinger was not designed to be fast, but I bet she's especially
                good in light air. And, of course, very beautiful. The racing catboat
                classes all trended toward hard-bilged shapes that were faster but
                crankier.

                Peter



                Bolger rules!!!
                - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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              • davejthib
                In 1994 Mike McEvoy of Battenkill Boatworks designed and built a 15 sandbagger catboat for me named American Flyer. This boat was modeled after the Comet, a
                Message 7 of 23 , Feb 12 4:48 AM
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                  In 1994 Mike McEvoy of Battenkill Boatworks designed and built a 15'
                  sandbagger catboat for me named American Flyer.

                  This boat was modeled after the Comet, a famous 18' sandbagger from
                  1876

                  The American Flyer had a hull weight of 240 pounds , a sail area of
                  160 sq ft, and a centerboard over 6' long, you won't go to windward
                  without a big centerboard area.

                  The American Flyer received the Concours d'Elegance award at the
                  1996 Wooden Boat Show at Mystic COnn.

                  The American Flyer was a very fast boat under certain conditions.

                  In Winds under 10 mph it would sail past 30' sloops both upwind and
                  down wind.

                  It would sail faster upwind and down wind than a Marshall 22' catboat.

                  When the wind got to 15 mph it was a different story. You needed a
                  crew of two or three to hold it down.

                  I sold the boat as I felt it was unsuitable for sailing alone.

                  Find a Windmill and have fun sailing

                  Dave Thibodeau
                • pvanderwaart
                  Here are a couple of current designs that are somewhat similar to the Windmill etc, http://www.boatplans-online.com/proddetail.php?prod=AR15
                  Message 8 of 23 , Feb 12 6:09 AM
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                    Here are a couple of current designs that are somewhat similar to the
                    Windmill etc,

                    http://www.boatplans-online.com/proddetail.php?prod=AR15
                    http://www.by-the-sea.com/archdavisdesign/davis_ace14.html

                    You might also look at Stuart Reid's Action Stations. This is a 13'
                    boat that uses a windsurfer rig and has Mini-Transat styling.

                    http://www.woodenboat.net.nz/Boats/BoatActionstations/Boatactionstatio
                    ns.html

                    Has anyone ever considered Bolger's Sparkler? It's a very neat
                    design, but I never heard of one being built. Bolger doesn't really
                    seem to like side-facing sailing seats. I've seen many pictures of
                    him sitting on the bottom of a boat (e.g. the cover picture on the
                    Folding Schooner). He tends to go for a little side-deck instead.

                    With respect to getting speed out of a flat-bottom skiff or sharpie-
                    like design, the comments describing the Pirate Racer are instructive
                    about PCB's thinking. He sets the beam as the max desireable in a
                    flat-bottom boat of the given length, and has a sentence or two about
                    the trade-off between a wide stern and a narrow one.

                    Peter
                  • Nels
                    ... Hi Steve, My first choice would be COMMON SENSE SKIFF (Design #591?) which has info in the files folder Perfect Skiff . It has a solent lug rig with a
                    Message 9 of 23 , Feb 12 7:02 AM
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                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stephan Hunter Henshall"
                      <steve_henshall@y...> wrote:
                      > Still having a good time with my Featherwind and at the moment
                      > adding flotation and building a new stronger weighted leeboard.
                      >
                      Hi Steve,

                      My first choice would be COMMON SENSE SKIFF (Design #591?) which has
                      info in the files folder "Perfect Skiff". It has a solent lug rig
                      with a small jib, off center board and retracting rudder blade which
                      leaves the stern clear for a 4 hp motor and it can also be rowed.

                      It was PCB's entry in the '91 WB design contest for a boat that
                      sailed, rowed and motored equally. It was the best design by far even
                      though it never won. The winning boat was not nearly as good a
                      performer.

                      Another design I really like is PIRATE RACER with plans available
                      from Dynamite Payson.

                      Cheers, Nels (Digging out from a snow storm that left 10 ft high
                      snowbanks in some yards:-)
                    • Bruce Hector
                      Have you considered adding hydrofoils? Getting the hull up out of the water will certainly add a few knots! Hope this works, if not google on hydrofoil
                      Message 10 of 23 , Feb 12 8:13 AM
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                        Have you considered adding hydrofoils? Getting the hull up out of the
                        water will certainly add a few knots!

                        Hope this works, if not google on "hydrofoil sailboats" for some
                        interesting designs.
                        http://tinyurl.com/2ug8k

                        Bruce Hector
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SunCoastRowingClub

                        We're getting some free publicity on Tampa Bay Chanel 10's morning
                        show next Monday, 16 Feb.

                        The bad news is they want to film live, starting at o dark 0445 hours.
                        Only someone as crazy as myself would agree.

                        Two local papers have our meetings on their online callendars, and
                        membership is up to twelve now, including some from Florida. Hope to
                        see some more rowers or rowing wanabee's at next Wednesday's meet at
                        the Pub Waterfront Restaurant and Lounge, 20025 Gulf Blvd, Indian
                        Rocks Beach, FL from 5 to 7 p.m.
                      • stormpetrel2002
                        If simplicity, beach-ability and speed are your criteria, then what about a Gypsy? You could save weight making the sides from 1/8th inch plywood and add a few
                        Message 11 of 23 , Feb 12 8:25 AM
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                          If simplicity, beach-ability and speed are your criteria, then what
                          about a Gypsy? You could save weight making the sides from 1/8th inch
                          plywood and add a few more holes in the bulkheads. I humiliated a
                          racing fleet of Lasers with my old Gypsy. Payson doesn't recommend
                          it,
                          but I always suspected that increasing the sail area twenty percent
                          or
                          so (maybe moving the mast forward a couple of inches to compensate)
                          would really make her fly. I put mine together in a long weekend, so
                          you can't beat her for construction times either.

                          I don't know if any were built, but Bolger's 19 foot "Sparkler"
                          design
                          from "30-Odd Boats" looks to be both fast and beachable as well.

                          Peter



                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
                          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Stephan Hunter Henshall"
                          > <steve_henshall@y...> wrote:
                          > > Still having a good time with my Featherwind and at the moment
                          > > adding flotation and building a new stronger weighted leeboard.
                          > >
                          > Hi Steve,
                          >
                          > My first choice would be COMMON SENSE SKIFF (Design #591?) which
                          has
                          > info in the files folder "Perfect Skiff". It has a solent lug rig
                          > with a small jib, off center board and retracting rudder blade
                          which
                          > leaves the stern clear for a 4 hp motor and it can also be rowed.
                          >
                          > It was PCB's entry in the '91 WB design contest for a boat that
                          > sailed, rowed and motored equally. It was the best design by far
                          even
                          > though it never won. The winning boat was not nearly as good a
                          > performer.
                          >
                          > Another design I really like is PIRATE RACER with plans available
                          > from Dynamite Payson.
                          >
                          > Cheers, Nels (Digging out from a snow storm that left 10 ft high
                          > snowbanks in some yards:-)
                        • pvanderwaart
                          ... The mast is an important component. If the mast is very flexible, then the top will blow off in strong winds as a sort of automatic fisherman s reef. When
                          Message 12 of 23 , Feb 12 8:46 AM
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                            > I always suspected that increasing the sail area twenty percent
                            > or
                            > so (maybe moving the mast forward a couple of inches to compensate)
                            > would really make her fly.

                            The mast is an important component. If the mast is very flexible,
                            then the top will blow off in strong winds as a sort of automatic
                            fisherman's reef.

                            When Bruce Kirby rigged his first Norwalk Island Sharpie with
                            fiberglass masts, he found her stiffer than he expected for this
                            reason, and changed the design by adding sail area. If he switched to
                            Al or C-fiber spars, he may have changed sailplan again, I don't know.

                            Peter
                          • Bruce Hallman
                            Bolger wrote that the Sailing Pirogue #637 [kind of like an Eeeek!] is: ..halfway between a board boat and a sailing kayak in performance, convenience and
                            Message 13 of 23 , Feb 12 9:02 AM
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                              Bolger wrote that the Sailing Pirogue #637 [kind
                              of like an Eeeek!] is:

                              ..halfway between a board boat and a sailing
                              kayak in performance, convenience and hazard.

                              That seems speedy!
                            • stormpetrel2002
                              Confession time: When I first tossed my newly made Gypsy in the Oakland estuary for her maiden voyage, a liveaboard neighbor of mine walked up with an old
                              Message 14 of 23 , Feb 12 9:57 AM
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                                Confession time:

                                When I first tossed my newly made Gypsy in the Oakland estuary for
                                her
                                maiden voyage, a liveaboard neighbor of mine walked up with an old
                                sailboard rig in his hands and said I could have it if it would be of
                                any use on my new toy.

                                Comparing the rig to the sail plan for the Gypsy, I was surprised to
                                see how similar they were.The shape and size were just about right.
                                The
                                sailboard, being an older one still used a dacron sail instead of
                                Mylar
                                like the new ones. It also came with a ready made fiberglass mast and
                                wishbone boom.

                                It fit right in and I sailed her like that for several months. One
                                day,
                                in a really stiff breeze I was hiked way out, rail under, water
                                splashing in the boat, trying to catch up to a Flying J , when with a
                                loud crack the mast snapped off where it came through the partner!

                                After several increasingly less than successful repair/modifications
                                to
                                the hollow fiberglass mast I finally had to toss the rig and build
                                the
                                wooden mast/sprit according to Payson's instructions. That was six
                                years ago and the new owner still sails it hard without mishap. I
                                guess
                                Bolger and Payson know what they were doing.

                                Peter














                                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@o...> wrote:
                                > > I always suspected that increasing the sail area twenty percent
                                > > or
                                > > so (maybe moving the mast forward a couple of inches to
                                compensate)
                                > > would really make her fly.
                                >
                                > The mast is an important component. If the mast is very flexible,
                                > then the top will blow off in strong winds as a sort of automatic
                                > fisherman's reef.
                                >
                                > When Bruce Kirby rigged his first Norwalk Island Sharpie with
                                > fiberglass masts, he found her stiffer than he expected for this
                                > reason, and changed the design by adding sail area. If he switched
                                to
                                > Al or C-fiber spars, he may have changed sailplan again, I don't
                                know.
                                >
                                > Peter
                              • Lincoln Ross
                                Archaeopterix is supposed to be very fast. Maybe the rig s slightly higher than you want, but it s not extreme. I forget which book it s in. An older design.
                                Message 15 of 23 , Feb 12 1:41 PM
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                                  Archaeopterix is supposed to be very fast. Maybe the rig's slightly
                                  higher than you want, but it's not extreme. I forget which book it's in.
                                  An older design.
                                • pvanderwaart
                                  ... design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos section of this group? http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb1.jpg
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Feb 12 3:24 PM
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                                    > Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ "Sandbagger"
                                    design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos
                                    section of this group?


                                    http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb1.jpg
                                    http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb2.jpg
                                    http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb3.jpg

                                    As of the publication in July 1990, it was only a cartoon concept.

                                    Peter (who put it on his own page due to space considerations)
                                  • Nels
                                    ... Thanks Peter, I really found the concept interesting and appreciate your sharing it with us. Fun to read that it would have been considered under canvassed
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Feb 12 4:18 PM
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                                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@o...> wrote:
                                      > > Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ "Sandbagger"
                                      > design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos
                                      > section of this group?
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb1.jpg
                                      > http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb2.jpg
                                      > http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb3.jpg
                                      >
                                      > As of the publication in July 1990, it was only a cartoon concept.
                                      >
                                      > Peter (who put it on his own page due to space considerations)

                                      Thanks Peter,

                                      I really found the concept interesting and appreciate your sharing it
                                      with us. Fun to read that it would have been considered under
                                      canvassed in it's day. That big long boom would be fun when going
                                      downwind in a some big waves:-)

                                      Cheers, Nels
                                    • Hugo Tyson
                                      Thanks for that Peter, very interesting. pvanderwaart wrote: Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ Sandbagger design/cartoon by
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Feb 13 3:25 AM
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                                        Thanks for that Peter, very interesting.

                                        pvanderwaart <pvanderw@...> wrote:> Has anybody got any pictures of this SBJ "Sandbagger"
                                        design/cartoon by Bolger that they could put in the files/photos
                                        section of this group?


                                        http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb1.jpg
                                        http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb2.jpg
                                        http://www.geocities.com/pvanderwaart/pb_sb3.jpg

                                        As of the publication in July 1990, it was only a cartoon concept.

                                        Peter (who put it on his own page due to space considerations)



                                        Bolger rules!!!
                                        - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                        - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                        - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                        - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                        - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                        - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                                      • rob4559
                                        Archaeopteryx sailboard is found in SMALL BOATS, 1973 pages 128 to 135. Bob P. ... it s in.
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Feb 13 10:11 AM
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                                          Archaeopteryx sailboard is found in SMALL BOATS, 1973 pages 128 to
                                          135.
                                          Bob P.



                                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Lincoln Ross <lincolnr@r...> wrote:
                                          > Archaeopterix is supposed to be very fast. Maybe the rig's slightly
                                          > higher than you want, but it's not extreme. I forget which book
                                          it's in.
                                          > An older design.
                                        • David Ryan
                                          LIES LIES LIES!!! As long as you ve got at least one crew, Bolger s Light Schooner ought to meet your need for speed. It meets most of your requirements except
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Feb 17 11:05 AM
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                                            LIES LIES LIES!!!



                                            As long as you've got at least one crew, Bolger's Light Schooner ought to
                                            meet your need for speed. It meets most of your requirements except that
                                            it's 23' long. As for getting upwind, well, none of these light boats are
                                            going to be great pointers with their low tech rigs and crude foils. But you
                                            can certainly get a thrill on a reach!

                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: "Stephan Hunter Henshall" <steve_henshall@...>
                                            To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2004 9:54 AM
                                            Subject: [bolger] The need for speed...


                                            > Still having a good time with my Featherwind and at the moment
                                            > adding flotation and building a new stronger weighted leeboard.
                                            >
                                            > I's time to consider boat number two. We all do this don't we???
                                            > I'm looking for suggestions with, loosly, the following criteria.
                                            >
                                            > Fast. 12 to 20 feet in length that is beachable, shoal draft, Can
                                            > be built using ply, copper nails, and glue. Monohul is preffered
                                            > but I'd consider a catamaran if need be. Speed is definetly my main
                                            > consideration at this time. I would like to build from hardware
                                            > store parts and for the sailing to be simple and uncomplicated not
                                            > requireing a second person on board but I don't mind hiking out a
                                            > bit for balance. Any sail rig is OK but I prefer lower sails such
                                            > as sprit or lug. Ketch with a jib would be OK or even lateen or
                                            > gaff rigged. Leeboard, centerboard or swing keel is OK.
                                            >
                                            > I know all of you have your own requirements when you sail, and
                                            > Featherwind is pretty fast but what are the real speedsters of the
                                            > Bolger line? I'd even consider a schooner if she pointed reasonably
                                            > well.



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